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The Death Studies Podcast

The Death Studies Podcast

By The Death Studies Podcast

The Death Studies Podcast is a platform for the diversity of voices in, around and contributing to the academic field of Death Studies. Find out more at www.thedeathstudiespodcast.com
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Lucy Willow

The Death Studies Podcast

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Mandy Gosling
Mandy Gosling
Mandy Gosling is a UKCP and BACP accredited psychotherapist, researcher and author, specialising in unresolved grief experienced by adults and couples who were bereaved as children.  As a bereaved child herself, Mandy completed a research MA in 2016 to ‘Understand Childhood Parental Bereavement from a Psychological and Spiritual Perspective’ and then established ABC Grief, the central focus for her private practice in High Wycombe, Bucks.  She is a contributing author in the anthology ‘My Mother’s Story – Gone Too Soon’ from which she co-presented a poster at the inaugural European Grief Conference, and is currently collaborating on a phenomenological research project to investigate the long term consequences of delayed and prolonged grief in adults bereaved as children.   Mandy continues to drive awareness in this niche and often overlooked area of grief through conversations in the media, podcasts and bereavement community. Find out more at  www.abcgrief.co.uk or follow on Twitter using @abcgrief and on LinkedIn under Mandy Gosling To cite this episode, you can use the following citation: Gosling, M. (2022) Interview on The Death Studies Podcast hosted by Michael-Fox, B. and Visser, R. Published 1 December 2022. Available at: www.thedeathstudiespodcast.com, DOI:10.6084/m9.figshare.21641285
01:15:09
December 01, 2022
Professor Gayle Letherby
Professor Gayle Letherby
Professor Gayle Letherby is a Visiting Professor of Sociology at the University of Plymouth and Visiting Professor at the University of Greenwich. She is a teacher, mentor and a researcher. Alongside substantive interests in reproductive and non/parental identities; gender, health and wellbeing; loss and bereavement; travel and transport mobility and gender and identity within institutions she has always been fascinated by research methodology, including auto/biographical, feminist and creative practices. In recent years Gayle has become interested in writing sociologically for non-academic audiences and creative writing within academic work. In addition to writing her own memoir and fiction she also runs ‘creative writing for academics’ workshops and has helped to facilitate a variety of research and writing events as consultant. Visit her staff profile for more information and Gayle's full publication list. Selected publications: Academic Publications Letherby, G. (1993) ‘The Meanings of Miscarriage’ Women’s Studies International Forum 16:2. Letherby, G. (1999) ‘Other than Mother and Mothers as Others: the experience of motherhood and non-motherhood in relation to ‘infertility’ and ‘involuntary childlessness’ Women’s Studies International Forum 22:3. Letherby, G. (2000) ‘Dangerous Liaisons: auto/biography in research and research writing’ in Lee-Treweek, G. and Linkogle. S. (eds) Danger in the Field: risk and ethics in social research London: Routledge. Exley, C. and Letherby, G. (2001) ‘Managing a Disrupted Lifecourse: issues of identity and emotion work’ Health 5:1. Letherby, G. (2003) Feminist Research in Theory and Practice Buckingham: Open University. Letherby, G. (2015) ‘Bathwater, Babies and Other Losses: A Personal and Academic Story’ Mortality: Promoting the interdisciplinary study of death and dying 20:2. Letherby, G. and Davidson, D. (2015) ‘Embodied Storytelling: loss and bereavement, creative practices and support’ Illness, Crisis and Loss 23:4. Brennan, M. and Letherby, G .(2017) ‘Auto/Biographical Approaches to Researching Death and Bereavement: connections, continuums, contrasts’ for Morality:Promoting the interdisciplinary study of death and dying 22(2). Letherby, G. (2017) ‘To Be or Not to Be (a mother): thinking about mothers and others through literature and social science’ in Browne V Giorgio A Jeremiah E Six A L and Rye G (eds) Motherhood in Literature and Culture: Interdisciplinary Perspectives from Europe London: Routledge. Davidson, D. and Letherby, G. (2019) ‘Use of the Internet and Griefwork in Perinatal Loss: motivations, methodologies and making meaning’ for Women’s Studies International Forum 74: May-June. Davidson, D. and Letherby, G. (2020) ‘Reflections on a Collaborative, Creative ‘Working’ Relationship’ in Parsons, J. and Chappell, A. (eds) The Palgrave Handbook of Auto/Biography(Auto/Biographical Creativity and Collaboration, Section Editor Letherby, G.) London: Palgrave. Letherby, G. (forthcoming) ‘Thirty Years and Counting: an-other auto/biographical story’ Auto/Biography Review. For Gayle's memoir and fiction writing please visit her page on ABC Tales.  Gayle is an avid twitter user and you can find her @gletherby.
01:27:09
November 01, 2022
Dr Jillian A. Tullis
Dr Jillian A. Tullis
Dr. Jillian A. Tullis is an Associate Professor in the Department of Communication Studies at the University of San Diego. Her teaching and research interests focus on health communication, specifically communication about dying and death in healthcare settings. She returned to her home state, joining the faculty at the University of San Diego in 2015, after serving on the faculty at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte for 6 years. Dr. Tullis is former chair of the Ethnography Division of the National Communication Association and continues to serve on the editorial boards of the Journal of Loss & Trauma and Qualitative Research in Medicine & Healthcare and is editor of the Critical Interventions forum of Departures in Critical Qualitative Research. She is currently conducting research about definitions of a good death. You can follow Jillian on twitter: @ProfJillian The book discussed in the intro is The Dead Hand Book: Stories From Gravesend Cemetery by Sara Richard. To cite this episode, you can use the following citation: Tullis, J. A. (2022) Interview on The Death Studies Podcast hosted by Michael-Fox, B. and Visser, R. Published 1 October 2022. Available at: www.thedeathstudiespodcast.com, DOI: 10.6084/m9.figshare.21251421
01:18:21
October 01, 2022
Dr Trish Biers and Dr Katie Stringer Clary Live at Death and Culture 2022
Dr Trish Biers and Dr Katie Stringer Clary Live at Death and Culture 2022
This episode was recorded LIVE at the Death and Culture conference at York St Johns University in September 2022 and features several of the conference attendees at the close of the episode. Tune in to hear their experiences!  Dr Trish Biers is the Collections Manager at the Level of Curator of the Duckworth laboratory (human and non-human primate remains and an archive) in the Centre for Human Evolutionary Studies in the Department of Archaeology at the University of Cambridge. She teaches in the Department about ethics, repatriation, treatment of the dead, mortuary archaeology, and osteology. She has excavated all over the world but specialises in mummies of South America. She is currently the Museum Representative, on the Board of Trustees, British Association for Biological Anthropology and Osteoarchaeology (BABAO)  and organises their sub-group on the sale and trade of human remains. Her research interests include  ancient and modern death work, mummy studies, osteoarchaeology and paleopathology, biomolecular archaeology, the Columbian Exchange, and museum studies focusing on displaying the dead, working with human remains, repatriation and ethics in archaeology.  She is also involved in research about witchcraft, folklore, and archaeology.  Trish is the ‘other-half’ of MorMortisMuseum with Dr Katie Stringer-Clary. Katie Stringer Clary, Ph.D., currently teaches history and public history at Coastal Carolina University in Conway, S.C. Since 2007, Clary worked with museums in various capacities from docent to executive director. In her time at museums and as a graduate student in Public History she focused on museum education and inclusion issues, especially for people with special needs. This research culminated in her 2014 manuscript, Programming for People with Special Needs: A Guide for Museums and Historic Sites. Through her work, she continues to advocate for accessibility, representation, and equality in museums and historic sites. Clary currently researches the ethics and historical contexts of human remains in museums, dark tourism and ghost tours at historic sites, and the roles death plays in the museum world. Museums, Heritage, and Death, co-edited with Dr. Trish Biers for Routledge Publishing is scheduled for release in 2023, and she also has two chapters in the volume.  Clary works closely with community organizations to preserve and interpret the past. She is also interested in the history of museums, museum administration, digital histories, and community engagement. In her spare time, she likes to camp and hike, travel, and spend time with her dogs Harry Clary and Brutus, cat Miss Frances, and six chickens. To cite this episode, you can use the following citation: Biers, T. and Stringer Clary, K. (2022) Interview on The Death Studies Podcast hosted by Michael-Fox, B. and Visser, R. Published 21 September. Available at: www.thedeathstudiespodcast.com, DOI: 10.6084/m9.figshare.21175312
01:06:57
September 21, 2022
Dr John Troyer
Dr John Troyer
Dr John Troyer is the Death Studies Scholar-at-Large and former director of the University of Bath’s Centre for Death and Society in the Department of Social and Policy Sciences at the University of Bath. John received his doctorate from the University of Minnesota in Comparative Studies in Discourse and Society. His Ph.D. dissertation, entitled "Technologies of the Human Corpse" was awarded the University of Minnesota's 2006 Best Dissertation Award in the Arts and Humanities. In 2020 MIT Press published his most recent book under the same title. From 2007-2008 he was a Visiting Assistant Professor in the Department of Comparative Studies at The Ohio State University teaching the cultural studies of science and technology. In 2018 he was awarded the University of Minnesota's Alumni of Notable Achievement Award for his work on death and dying and in 2019 he received the University of Bath's Mary Tasker Award for excellence in teaching. Within the field of death studies, John focuses on the history of science and technology, science and technology studies, bioethics and the law. You can follow John on Twitter @DeathRef To cite this episode, you can use the following citation: Figshare: This is the interview featured in episode thirteen of The Death Studies Podcast. This interview is with Dr John Troyer. You can find out more about the guests and hear the full episode including an addendum with John about his mother’s death at www.thedeathstudiespodcast.com or listen to the full episode wherever you find your podcasts. Please cite as: Troyer, J. (2022) Interview on The Death Studies Podcast hosted by Michael-Fox, B. and Visser, R. Published 1 September 2022. Available at: www.thedeathstudiespodcast.com, DOI: 10.6084/m9.figshare.20750005
01:37:55
September 01, 2022
Dr Sara Knox
Dr Sara Knox
Dr Sara Knox is Associate Professor in the Writing and Society Research Group and the School of Humanities and Languages at the University of Western Sydney. She is the author of Murder: a Tale of Modern American Life (Duke University Press, 1998) and other notable works on violence and representation.  Her most recent publications include work on Hilary Mantel, including a study of the moral geography of violence in Mantel's novels,  and the regeneration of the historical novel as literary genre. Her novel The Orphan Gunner (Giramondo, 2007) won the 2009 Asher Literary Prize and was short-listed for the Commonwealth Writer’s Prize and the Age Book of the Year. To cite this episode, you can use the following citation: Knox, S. (2022) Interview on The Death Studies Podcast hosted by Michael-Fox, B. and Visser, R. Published 1 August 2022. Available at: www.thedeathstudiespodcast.com, DOI: 10.6084/m9.figshare.20393631
01:09:33
August 01, 2022
Dr Helen Frisby
Dr Helen Frisby
Dr Helen Frisby obtained her PhD on Victorian funeral customs from the University of Leeds in 2009. Helen is a Visiting Research Fellow at the Centre for Death & Society, University of Bath, Secretary of the Association for the Study of Death & Society (ASDS) and a Council Member of the Folklore Society. She continues to research, publish and speak on the history and folklore of death, dying and bereavement, including appearances on the History Channel and BBC Radio. Helen’s book Traditions of Death and Burialwas published in 2019. Other recent research, with the University of Bristol, investigates the informal occupational culture of frontline cemetery staff. Helen is also Researcher Development Manager at UWE Bristol, with particular expertise in academic writing, qualitative research methods and postgraduate researcher wellbeing. Here are some of the references that Helen mentioned: ● Ronald Hutton ‘The English Reformation and the Evidence of Folklore’ Past and Present 148 (1) pp.89-116. ● Ronald Hutton The Triumph of the Moon: A History of Modern Pagan Witchcraft Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1999. ● Brian Parsons The Evolution of the British Funeral Industry in the 20th Century: From Undertaker to Funeral Director. Bingley: Emerald Publishing, 2018. Helen’s favourite popular culture depiction of the Sin Eater is the film The Order(US Title)/The Sin Eater (UK title) To cite this episode, please use the following citation: Frisby, H. (2022) Interview on The Death Studies Podcast hosted by Michael-Fox, B. and Visser, R. Published 1 July 2022. Available at: www.thedeathstudiespodcast.com, DOI: 10.6084/m9.figshare.20161061 Figshare: This is the interview featured in episode eleven of The Death Studies Podcast. This interview is with Dr Helen Frisby. You can find out more about the guests and hear the full episode at www.thedeathstudiespodcast.com or listen to the full episode wherever you find your podcasts. Please cite as: Frisby, H. (2022) Interview on The Death Studies Podcast hosted by Michael-Fox, B. and Visser, R. Published 1 July 2022. Available at: www.thedeathstudiespodcast.com, DOI: 10.6084/m9.figshare.20161061
54:42
July 01, 2022
Dr Ruth Penfold-Mounce
Dr Ruth Penfold-Mounce
Dr Ruth Penfold-Mounce is a Senior Lecturer in Criminology in the Sociology Department at the University of York. Her background in Sociology is united with an interest in crime and deviance, death studies and popular culture and celebrity. Ruth leads the Death and Culture Network at the University of York, co-edits the Death and Culture Book Series, and hosts the Death and Culture conference every two years. She also does regular public engagement events and media appearances. She is author of the book Death, the Dead and Popular Culture as well as numerous other publications including an award-winning journal article on gender inequality after death, all of which are discussed in this episode. Sign up for Death and Culture IV here: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/death-and-culture-iiii-tickets-177889842307 Find out more about submitting to the Death and Culture book series here: https://bristoluniversitypress.co.uk/death-and-culture To cite this episode, you can use the following citation: Penfold-Mounce, R. (2022) Interview on The Death Studies Podcast hosted by Michael-Fox, B. and Visser, R. Published 1 June 2022. Available at: www.thedeathstudiespodcast.com, DOI: 10.6084/m9.figshare.19948010
01:14:29
June 01, 2022
Prof. Frank Eyetsemitan
Prof. Frank Eyetsemitan
Professor Frank Eyetsemitan is Professor of Psychology at Roger Williams University in Bristol Rhode Island, where he previously held the position of Associate Dean for Social Sciences Division of the College of Arts and Sciences. Professor Eyetsemitan’s work in the field of aging spans almost three decades. His research interests include intergenerational relationships (within families and within skilled care facilities), cross-cultural gerontology, and adult grief outcomes. Prof Eyetsemitan’s works have appeared in prominent journals on Aging and Death & Dying, including the Journal of Cross-Cultural Gerontology; Death Studies; and OMEGA: Death and Dying. His book (published in 2003 with James Gire as co-author), entitled: Aging and Adult Development in Developing Societies: Applying Western Theories and Concepts discusses the appropriateness of applying key Western theories and concepts to non-Western populations. He is also the author of the textbook, Understanding Death & Dying: Encountering death, dying and the afterlife (2020); and of Death, Dying and Bereavement Around the World: theories, varied views and customs(2021). For a discount on the book discussed in the intro and outro, Free Yourself from Death Anxiety: A CBT Self-Help Guide for a Fear of Death and Dying by Rachel E. Menzies and David Veale, available at £12 rather than £14.99 once the discount is applied, please order from the publisher’s website at the link below. Please apply VEALEMNZ20 at checkout. This code is valid for one year from the release of this episode. You can find the book here: https://uk.jkp.com/products/free-yourself-from-death-anxiety To cite this episode, you can use the following citation: Eyetsemitan, F. (2022) Interview on The Death Studies Podcast hosted by Michael-Fox, B. and Visser, R. Published 6 May 2022. Available at: www.thedeathstudiespodcast.com, DOI: 10.6084/m9.figshare.19721980 Figshare: This is the interview featured in episode eight of The Death Studies Podcast. This interview is with Professor Frank Eyetsemitan. You can find out more about the guests and hear the full episode at www.thedeathstudiespodcast.com or listen to the full episode wherever you find your podcasts. Please cite as: Eyetsemitan, F. (2022) Interview on The Death Studies Podcast hosted by Michael-Fox, B. and Visser, R. Published 6 May 2022. Available at: www.thedeathstudiespodcast.com, DOI: 10.6084/m9.figshare.19721980
57:23
May 06, 2022
Lucy Willow
Lucy Willow
In this episode, hear artist Lucy Willow talk about her work. Born in Whitstable, Kent Lucy Willow graduated with first class BA in Fine Art from Falmouth College of Art in 2003. Willow lives and works in Cornwall and has exhibited widely both nationally and internationally. Her work first received acclaim with a series of Dust carpets made on location and for specific environments, Smithfield abattoir (2005), Old Romney Church (2005), Make it Real, Whitstable, Kent (2006), Art Now Cornwall, Tate St.Ives commission (2007). In 2001 Willow won the BAMS (British Art Medal Society) award for contemporary medal making. Willow’s photographic work was presented for the first time with a solo show at Millennium Gallery St.Ives (2009). Willow was selected in 2009, with seven artists representing Cornwall, to show in London in a project called Gloria Zoo Art 2009. In 2014 she had a solo exhibition Fallen at Kestle Barton, Centre for Contemporary art, Cornwall (April – June 2014), where she developed a body of work over a two-year period with two artist residencies. In December 2015 she was artist in residence at HERE factory in Iceland where her work was strongly influenced by the dark winter months and bleak landscape. In March 2016 she became artists in residence in Guangzhou China as part of an arts international program and had a solo show in Redtory arts district, Guangzhou (April – May 2016). Willow presented a paper at the Malady and Mortality conference, Falmouth University 2013 Paper: The last Portrait, a microscopic view of transience, mourning and loss. Published in Malady and Mortality: Illness, Disease and Death in Literary and Visual Culture (2016) Chapter: The last Portrait, a microscopic view of transience, mourning and loss. In 2020 she set up an organisation DUST The Art of Grief from an old shop in Penzance as a space to bring together artists, artefacts, members of the community and professionals working in end of life and funeral industries. Lucy Willow is currently part time senior lecturer in Fine Art at Falmouth University, an end of life photographer, a freelance practitioner using creative practice to tell community stories of grief and a recently trained funeral celebrant hoping to bring artworks into funeral settings. Find out more at: www.lucywillow.art www.art-of-grief.co.uk(sign up for the newsletter we mention here) https://www.instagram.com/art_of_grief/ https://www.instagram.com/artist_lucy_willow/ Read the chapter we discuss here: http://repository.falmouth.ac.uk/1894/ To cite this episode, you can use the following citation: Willow, L. (2022) Interview on The Death Studies Podcast hosted by Michael-Fox, B. and Visser, R. Published 1 April 2022. Available at: www.thedeathstudiespodcast.com, DOI:10.6084/m9.figshare.19493975
01:02:36
April 01, 2022
Dr Panagiotis Pentaris
Dr Panagiotis Pentaris
Panagiotis Pentaris is an Associate Professor of Social Work and Thanatology in the School of Human Sciences at the University of Greenwich, England, UK, where he is also a member of the Institute for Lifecourse Development. Panagiotis is a council member for the Association for the Study of Death and Society, the Chair of the ASDS Ambassadors Scheme, a Research Fellow for the Faiths & Civil Society Unit at Goldsmiths, and over the last ten years he has researched and published on death, dying, bereavement, culture and religion, social work, social policy and LGBTQIA+ issues. Panagiotis is licensed in Social Work. He has practised social work in the field of thanatology, notably with dying children and adults, and bereaved individuals; he has practised both internationally and nationally. Positions held include hospice social worker, independent bereavement therapist, and social policy consultant regarding end of life strategies and palliative and hospice care guidance, as well as disaster social work. Two books we talk about in the episode are linked below, both published by Routledge. Death, Grief and Loss in the Context of COVID-19  and Dying in a Transhumanist and Posthuman Society. See Panagiotis’s staff profile at the University of Greenwich for a full overview of his publications. To cite this episode, you can use the following citation: Pentaris, P. (2022) Interview on The Death Studies Podcast hosted by Michael-Fox, B. and Visser, R. Published 1 March 2022. Available at: www.thedeathstudiespodcast.com, DOI:10.6084/m9.figshare.19267499
01:07:46
March 01, 2022
Dr Kate Woodthorpe
Dr Kate Woodthorpe
Kate Woodthorpe became CDAS (the Centre for Death and Society at the University of Bath, UK) Co-Director in 2021, having joined CDAS in January 2010, and acting as Programme Leader for the Foundation Degree in Funeral Services until 2012. Kate has had articles and book chapters published on funeral costs, state support for funerals, mortuary practice, professional development, cemetery usage, the experience of researching in this area, and public dying. She is on the editorial board for Death Studies, Bereavement Care, Sociology, and Mortality, which she co-edited until 2019. She has advised the UK Government on funeral policy over many years, including in 2016 as a Special Adviser to the Government's Work and Pensions Select Committee Inquiry on Bereavement Benefits, and provided evidence in 2019 to the Competition and Market's Authority Funeral Sector Investigation. She is keen to support the next generation of academics and has published a book for PhD students and early career colleagues entitled 'Survive and Thrive in Academia: the new academic's pocket mentor' (2018, Routledge). To cite this episode, you can use the following citation: Woodthorpe, K. (2022) Interview on The Death Studies Podcast hosted by Michael-Fox, B. and Visser, R. Published 1 February 2022. Available at: www.thedeathstudiespodcast.com, DOI: 10.6084/m9.figshare.19102700
51:18
February 01, 2022
Dr Kami Fletcher
Dr Kami Fletcher
Dr. Kami Fletcher is an Associate Professor of American & African American History and Co-Coordinator of Women’s and Gender Studies at Albright College. She teaches courses that explore the African experience in America and unpacks social and cultural U.S. history all at the intersection of race, gender, class, and sexuality. Her research centers on African American burial grounds, late 19th/early 20th century Black female and male undertakers, and contemporary Black grief and mourning. She is the co-editor of Till Death Do Us Part: American Ethnic Cemeteries as Borders Uncrossed which examines the internal and/or external drives among ethnic, religious, and racial groups to separate their dead (University Press of Mississippi, April 2020) She is currently working on Grave History: Death, Race & Gender in Southern Cemeteries from Antebellum to the Post-Civil Rights Era  investigates the southern places where cemeteries take root as well as probe the interplay of southern history, culture, race, class, gender, and climate in these cities of the dead (University of Georgia Press). Currently, Dr. Fletcher is working on a manuscript that historicizes Mount Auburn Cemetery in Baltimore, the first Black owned and operated cemetery in Maryland. The book positions African American cemeteries as the point where life and death meet arguing that this meeting point is a symbol of Black freedom from White control. At the end of the show, Beth asks about one of the paintings on the wall behind Kami.  Kami’s lifemate, sociologist and artist Dr. Myron T. Strong, painted it.  It is entitled "Guardian".  If you are interested in seeing it or purchasing a print, you can do so at his website:  http://myrontstrong.weebly.com/store/p1/print-guardian.html For more on Dr. Fletcher visit her website: www.kamifletcher.weebly.comand/or contact her on Twitter using @kamifletcher36 Some of Dr. Fletcher’s other recent publications include: Fletcher, Kami and Tamara Waraschinski “Between Cultural Necrophilia & African American Activism: Life & Loss in the Age of COVID” In Death, Grief and Loss in the Context of COVID-19 edited by Panagiotis Pentaris. Routledge, August 2021. Fletcher, Kami. “Long Live Chill #LLC: Exploring Grief, Memorial & Ritual in African American R.I.P.     T- shirt Culture.” In Beyond the Veil: Reflexive Study of Death and Dying, edited by Kalliopi Christoduoulaki and Aubrey Thamann, New York: Berghahn Books, May 2021. To find out about the Death and Culture conference we mention in the introduction, see here. To cite this episode, you can use the following citation: Fletcher, K. (2022) Interview on The Death Studies Podcast hosted by Michael-Fox, B. and Visser, R. Published 12 January 2022. Available at: www.thedeathstudiespodcast.com, DOI: 10.6084/m9.figshare.18272015
01:11:49
January 12, 2022
Georgina Bond
Georgina Bond
Georgina Bond is an anatomy technician in the Medical Teaching Unit at the University of Sheffield. She deals with people who chose to donate their body upon their death, including their embalming, their dissection and their eventual funeral. She has a BSc in Biology from Sheffield Hallam University and an MSc in Human Osteology and Funerary Archaeology from the University of Sheffield and has previously worked in Outreach. Georgina also volunteers her time at Bart's Pathology Museum and has now taken on an Ethics Reviewer role for the Medical School at the University of Sheffield. You can follow Georgina on twitter @georginab2610 and her lab @SheffAnatomy She also has a few blog posts about body donation which you can view at thedonationdiaries.wordpress.com To cite this episode, you can use the following citation: Bond, G. (2021) Interview on The Death Studies Podcast hosted by Michael-Fox, B. and Visser, R. Published 16 December 2021. Available at: www.thedeathstudiespodcast.com, DOI:  https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.17212505.v1
01:04:40
December 17, 2021
Death Doulas
Death Doulas
In this episode, hear Deb Rawlings and Emma Clare discuss Death Doulas. Deb Rawlings is a Senior Lecturer in postgraduate palliative care at Flinders University, Adelaide, South Australia. With a background in palliative care nursing, Deb is an academic/researcher with an interest in the Death Doula role. Deb is a member of the Research Centre for Palliative Care, Death and Dying at Flinders University.She was an author and moderator on the successful Dying2Learn MOOC. Deb is Co-Lead Investigator on the End-of-Life Essentials project funded by the Australian Department of health which aims to support health professional working in acute hospitals. The End-of-life essentials website can be accessed here.  https://www.flinders.edu.au/research-centre-palliative-care-death-dying You can follow Deb on Twitter @deb_rawlings  The Conversation article we mention in the podcast is titled ‘Passed away, kicked the bucket, pushing up daisies – the many ways we don’t talk about death’ and can be accessed here. You can download the corresponding journal article here.  Some of her death doula articles as discussed on the podcast are: Rawlings, Litster, Miller-Lewis, Tieman, Swetenham. End-of-Life Doulas: A qualitative analysis of interviews with Australian and International death doulas on their role. Health Soc Care Community. 2020;00:1–14. https://doi.org/10.1111/hsc.13120 Rawlings, Litster, Miller-Lewis, Tieman, Swetenham. The voices of death doulas about their role in end of life care. Health Soc Care Community. 2020;28(1):12‐21. doi:10.1111/hsc.12833 Rawlings D, Tieman J, Miller‐Lewis L, Swetenham K. (2018) What role do Death Doulas play in end‐of‐life care? A systematic review. Health Soc Care Community. 2019;27(3):e82‐e94. doi:10.1111/hsc.12660 To cite Deb in this episode, you can use the following citation: Rawlings, D. (2021) Interview on The Death Studies Podcast hosted by Michael-Fox, B. and Visser, R. Published 15 November 2021. Available at: www.thedeathstudiespodcast.com, DOI: https:doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.17012624 Emma Clare is a Health Psychology PhD researcher and Director of End of Life Doula UK. Based in Yorkshire, she describes herself as an activist and nature lover with a passion for bringing death and dying out of hospitals and back into compassionate communities wherever possible. Emma's current research is focused on supporting individuals (both professionals and the public) to develop death competency – our skills and capabilities in dealing with death and dying. You can follow Emma on Twitter @emmacclare  To cite Emma in this episode, you can use the following citation: Clare, E. (2021) Interview on The Death Studies Podcast hosted by Michael-Fox, B. and Visser, R. Published 15 November 2021. Available at: www.thedeathstudiespodcast.com, DOI: https:doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.17012624
01:12:53
November 15, 2021
Dr Khyati Tripathi
Dr Khyati Tripathi
In this episode, hear Dr. Khyati Tripathi discuss Death Studies, death anxiety research, Covid-19 in India, qualitative and autoethnographic work, Psychosocial Studies and her own experiences of studying for a PhD whilst living with Rheumatoid Arthritis. Khyati is an Assistant Professor at UPES, the University of Petroleum and Energy Studies in Dehradun, India. She is a death researcher with a focus in psychosocial, cultural and religious studies and is the Ambassador for India for the Association for the Study of Death and Society.  Khyati is also a commonwealth scholarship alumna who spent a year of her PhD at Birkbeck College, University of London. You can follow Khyati on Twitter @khyati_tripathi Khyati’s chapter on managing a PhD with a Health Condition, discussed in the podcast, is as follows: Tripathi, K., Johnstone, A.& Johnson, M. (2019). Managing PhD with a Health Condition. In PsyPAG Guide (2nd Edition). British Psychological Society: London To cite this episode, you can use the following citation: Tripathi, K. (2021) Interview on The Death Studies Podcast hosted by Michael-Fox, B. and Visser, R. Published 21 October 2021. Available at: www.thedeathstudiespodcast.com, DOI: https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.16843690
54:13
October 21, 2021
Dr Erica Borgstrom
Dr Erica Borgstrom
In this episode, hear Dr. Erica Borgstrom discuss Death Studies, Thanatology, her research into End-of-Life Care, ethnography and her work as a journal editor for the Death Studies journal Mortality as well as ‘imposter syndrome’ in academia. Erica is a medical anthropologist and lecturer at the Open University, where she is the Qualifications Lead for Health and Social Care and the lead for Open Thanatology. She is a Fellow of the Royal Anthropological Institute and Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy. Erica is one of the two editors for the academic journal Mortality. You can follow Erica on Twitter @EricaBorsgstrom  Watch ‘Should everyone have an ‘end-of-life’ plan?’here. Watch ‘Life or Death Decisions’ here. Experience the ‘Life or Death Decisions’ interactive here.  From 1 October 2021, Erica will be Senior Lecturer at the Open University. Congratulations Erica! Her latest co-edited book, which is due to be released at the time of the episode’s release, is co-edited with Sharon Mallon and called Narratives of COVID: loss, dying, death and grief during COVID-19. It will be available via Draft2Digital, Amazon, and Open Research Online. Do check it out! To cite this episode you can use the following citation: Borgstrom, E. (2021) Interview on The Death Studies Podcast hosted by Michael-Fox, B. and Visser, R. Published 17 September 2021. Available at: www.thedeathstudiespodcast.com, DOI: https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.16640065.v1
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September 17, 2021