JJAB BUZZ

JJAB BUZZ

By William High Eagle Sandoval
The goal of the JJAB Resource Specialist program is to surround youth within our community with support, empowering them to thrive in school and life.
*Any views or opinions represented in this podcast belong solely to the owner and do not represent those of people, institutions or organizations that the owner may or may not be associated with in professional or personal capacity, unless explicitly stated. Any views or opinions are not intended to malign any religion, ethnic group, club, organization, company, or individual.
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Meet Christine Martinez

JJAB BUZZ

Meet Christine Martinez

JJAB BUZZ

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Part 4 conversation with William High Eagle Sandoval and a Los Alamos High School Student
Why I want to implement this in my life Always do your Best I can’t lie, this agreement was by far the hardest to conceptualize. I had so many intriguing thoughts and felt engagement to all the other agreements, but with this one my mind felt blank. I don’t want to make assumptions, but I can only assume that I had such a difficult time with this agreement because it's the one that's most difficult for me in practice. It’s cheesy isn’t it? The same quote we’ve heard countless times throughout our lives. Since we were young people always say to always do your best. This got me wondering, what is my best? Obviously I’m the only person who could know if I’m doing my best or not but I don't know what my best is. Is it the best result or the most effort? As a professional procrastinator I often put things off until the last minute and then don’t have enough time to do my best. But when I do the best work I could in the time frame I unfortunately gave myself, is that my best? See what I mean? How do I do my best when I don’t know what my best is?  From what I’ve seen from my peers in Los Alamos, I highly doubt I’m the only one who feels this way. In my experience this town is a very polarizing one. There is nothing to do for teens, so pointless drama is no foreign concept to us. We’ve never had to do our best because what is there to focus all that energy on? I shouldn’t say we, but I know this applies to someone other than myself. I don’t mean to go off topic but when researching this agreement I couldn’t help but think there's no outlet for me to pour my energy into. I’ve found myself heavily relying on others because there's nothing I enjoy doing on my own. I think this is a huge reason I don’t know the meaning of doing my best.  Although this agreement is the most vague it is exactly what ties the agreements to each other. Repetition is the best way to learn and get better at something. Using that logic doing your best at something is through repetition until it's mastered. That's the idea behind this agreement following the other agreements. If you practice these agreements repetitively they will become simpler to do. The more comfortable you are with the agreements the more comfortably you can practice them successfully. I believe the reason Don Miguel Ruiz chose this agreement as the last one is because it’s the answer to competently be able to perform the rest of the agreements. These agreements aren’t stone cold rules, and aren’t always going to be easy or even possible to do. That being said, keeping them in the back of your mind, and using them to simplify conflict is exactly what The Four Agreements is intended to do. I’ve learned a lot from researching these agreements. It has completely changed the way I view mindfulness. I hope that after learning about these four “rules” to life you think about the way you carry yourself. I can promise I’m going to try my best to implement these into my daily life and I hope you do the same. 
11:28
July 22, 2020
The Four Agreements Part 3
Don’t make Assumptions We all know what they say about making assumptions...if you don’t I’m sure you still can agree that assuming things without knowing the whole truth is silly. Making assumptions is an easy thing to do because most of the time we don’t realize we're making them. Personally, out of every agreement I want to implement this one is my life the most. I catch myself making assumptions about people I’ve never met before, yet getting upset when the same is done to me. Rumors are a huge part of making assumptions. We hear things about other people and just deem the information as true. Rumors are so easy to spread because no one cares enough to check to see if it’s true. I’m sure every person out there who has made it passes middle school knows what it’s like to have rumors spread about them. We hate it when people make assumptions about us, so what right do we have to make assumptions about them? This agreement goes deeper than just rumors and drama. We shouldn’t assume anything; people, the news, politics, celebrities, any information we don’t know for a fact is true.  The most important thing I hope you take from this agreement is not everyone has the same information or knowledge as you. We can’t always assume someone is going to know what we're talking about, or what we mean by the words we say. I’ve talked a lot about miscommunication on this podcast. The reason being, I think the most important tool we have to maintain healthy relationships (romantically or platonically) is communication. If you’re unsure of something, ask! If you hear a rumor and don’t know if it's true, don’t talk about it! Constantly making assumptions is exactly what makes the media such a toxic thing. People will see or hear a story and believe it because they saw it on a news source. There are so many non reliable sources we listen to and take at face value. I don’t want to get into politics or anything sensitive like that, but a great tip to be sure you're getting reliable information is just to check several different sources. Simple as that! Now that's all good and well with the media, but it's not that simple for things you hear about people. So my tip in that regard is don’t believe and especially don't spread anything you hear about someone if it doesn’t come from them. Also, just don’t talk about issues that don’t concern you. Gossip and rumors have a funny way of getting back to the person, so just be cautious of what you say. One might even say...be impeccable with your words.  Practicing this agreement successfully is essential to not take things personally in my opinion. Without all the information we make inaccurate assumptions, and that could lead to getting needlessly defensive. I saw this with several of my closest friends a few years ago. Because of a rumor, my friends claimed that they knew I was saying bad things about them, when I really wasn’t. They heard a rumor, made an assumption and acted irrationally because of it, They got offended and upset at me because of inaccurate assumptions and this unfortunately led to a falling out. I’ve also hurt people because of the assumptions I’ve made. I find that after making assumptions people are quick to take those assumptions personally. The worst part is a majority of the time, we don’t even realize we’re doing this. Being aware of assumptions you make and having the mental strength to disregard those assumptions is the best way I’ve found to practice this agreement. 
04:36
July 17, 2020
The Four Agreements Part 1 and 2
Don Miguel Ruiz wrote a book called the Four Agreements entailing a few rules that enable a simpler, happier life. These Agreements include; be impeccable with your words, do not take anything personally, do not make assumptions, and always do your best. Now, we will be taking a closer look at the first agreement, be impeccable with your word. I’m sure most of you are thinking “What does that entitle?” To understand this better, here are a few quick definitions. Impeccable means faultless or flawless. Alright, but how can we be faultless with our words? This is where things get tricky. When I first read this agreement I thought “word” was literal, however, “word” is intended to mean our expressions, our thoughts, the energy we use to communicate with others and ourselves. That is a little broad, so now we can break it down. First, let's discuss how we can be impeccable with spoken words. Imagine if every word you spoke casted a spell. Positive words manifested positive outcomes, and negative words a negative outcome. This sounds crazy until you think about theories like the Law of Attraction. The theory states that positive and negative thoughts will lead to similar outcomes because thoughts are energy which is transferable. I am willing to admit that I have started educating myself on this subject recently. For more information please look to more reliable sources. That being said, personally, I believe in manifestation from our thoughts and words. It’s really all the same concept as karma (good and bad) or jinxing something. We have seen this same idea several times, but in practice this agreement is much more difficult than it sounds. If we use our words to spread positivity then positivity will come back to us, simple as that. Now, the complicated part is understanding how do we do that with our thoughts? We cannot really control what we think, right? Wrong. It’s all about mentality. We, as a society, have continuously undermined the power of our mind. We have so much control over ourselves, but get so distracted trying to control things we never could control to begin with. Trying to direct someone's thoughts or actions is pointless, so we must save that energy for what is in our power. It takes time and practice to have mindfulness, but if there is anything you take from what I say I hope it's this: do not waste time trying to fix other people. Use that same time and energy into promoting healthy life habits for yourself, both mental and physical.  Self love is essential and we cannot love ourselves until we know ourselves. That might sound disjointed from the topic at hand, but having that mindfulness and that self love is ultimately what will make this agreement possible. When you have a positive mindset problems are much easier to overcome. A positive mindset does not mean only thinking and speaking of things that make you happy. Looking at problems in yourself and your life and trying to tackle them is also positive. Simple behaviors like that can completely change your view of the world, in my experience at least. Of course, all of this is simpler said than done. Being aware of these agreements and having them in the back of your head can make a world of difference. Now then, to talk about our actions. Thoughts and words are ultimately meaningless if your actions do not back them up. The funny thing about words is they are very easy to believe, but not mean. It is much easier to say you will do or change something, but the follow through is what makes those words fact or fiction. I often find myself saying all these changes I am going to make to my life, but my actions don’t follow suit. For example, all summer I’ve been saying how I’m gonna start working out or eating healthier. It’s an easy thing to say, but actually do? That's where I (and many others) struggle. Next time you make a statement like that, take a second to think.
14:16
July 17, 2020
Santina Shije's Tip #2
Hi JJAB listeners, This is Santina Shije with parenting tip #2. Create a positive support system for each individual in the family. This can be done digitally or In-person This support system can include: Friends/Family Mentors Therapists Pen pals Community Leaders Any other positive influences that may be involved with your child. This will allow your children to: Have an outlet Have positive influences Practice communication Have new experiences Talk about struggles Spend time getting to know another healthy person It may take some time to set appointments/intakes and in the long run be a true support and allow parents/caretakers to refill their cup. Our RS’s are always available to help coordinate these services an individual may need. Thank you for listening and tune in again.
01:31
July 2, 2020
Meet Santina Shije
Santina is a tribal member of San Ildefonso Pueblo. She is a Mother/Guardian of 5 children, ages 5-14yrs old. Santina has been working with youth and their families for over 10 years. She started her career at the State of New Mexico Income Support Division as a Case Worker, assisting youth and families to obtain state assistance and moving on to a Career Development Specialist for Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) Program, assisting families in obtaining employment and training. After leaving the State of New Mexico, she received her Master’s of Social Work Degree and a State Licensure. Santina now works for JJAB as a Youth Resource Specialist. Santina is caring and is passionate about assisting youth and families in the best way for each unique situation as she knows about overcoming challenges and living in a community where there is available supports.
07:41
July 1, 2020
60 Second Mental Health Tips With Danielle Sutherland
Hello JJAB Listeners.  My name is Danielle Sutherland, I am a Youth Mental Health First Aid instructor.  May is Mental Health awareness month, and since we have been under stay at home orders since March, it is important for us to stay vigilant in keeping our minds and bodies health.  If you have taken a Youth Mental Health First Aid class you learned about our ALGEE, our action plan.  ALGEE is an acronym for: Asses for risk of suicide or harm Listen nonjudgmentally Give reassurance and information Encourage appropriate professional help Encourage self-help and other support strategies If you or someone you know may be at risk of harming themselves its important to let them know that you are there to support them. Here are some examples of how you may start that conversation: I’ve noticed that you don’t talk to your friends anymore, can I help you connect with them? I’ve noticed that you’ve been spending a lot of time by yourself, would you like to go for a walk, play game, or bake some cookies? I know that these past few months have been hard for you.  I’m here for you if you’d like to talk or I can help you find someone you feel more comfortable with. If the person you are concerned about is close to you, they may not want to open up to you for a variety of reasons… and that’s ok. We have lots of people in our community who can help you connect with the right people.  Here in Los Alamos you can reach out to your school counselor, JJAB Resource Specialists, or you can call the suicide prevention hotline. Los Alamos Public School: https://laschools.net/  JJAB: https://www.losalamosjjab.com/resource-specialists  Suicide Prevention Hotlines:  National: 800.273.8255 New Mexico: 855.662.7474 New Mexico Peer to Peer Warmline: 855.466.7100 National Text line: 741741
02:07
May 28, 2020
Meet Tara Adams
Tara Adams has been working with children, families, and communities for over 20 years. She first worked as a family daycare provider and volunteer community organizer while raising her babies in rural northern California. During this time, she began studying child development and helped to organize a community stream restoration project, leading community meetings with children in tow. After moving To New Mexico in 2005 with her husband and three sons, Tara worked as a family daycare provider and instructional assistant in the public schools before taking a job at the First Born Program in 2014. As a home visitor working with families from pregnancy through three years of age, she realized that working with parents and young children together was her passion. Tara completed dual majors in Early Childhood Education and Family Support and Social Work at Western New Mexico University, graduating summa cum laudein 2019. Having completed her fieldwork with JJAB under Santina Shije, Tara decided to become a family resource specialist, working primarily with the elementary school population. This is work that allows her to engage with community, parents, and children simultaneously, creatively combining the skills learned in previous work and education.
07:31
May 26, 2020
60 Second Parenting Tips With Santina Shije
Santina is a tribal member of San Ildefonso Pueblo. She is a Mother/Guardian of 5 children, ages 5-14yrs old. Santina has been working with youth and their families for over 10 years. She started her career at the State of New Mexico Income Support Division as a Case Worker, assisting youth and families to obtain state assistance and moving on to a Career Development Specialist for Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) Program, assisting families in obtaining employment and training. After leaving the State of New Mexico, she received her Master’s of Social Work Degree and a State Licensure. Santina now works for JJAB as a Youth Resource Specialist. Santina is caring and is passionate about assisting youth and families in the best way for each unique situation as she knows about overcoming challenges and living in a community where there is available supports.
01:16
May 12, 2020
Meet Danielle Sutherland
Meet Danielle Sutherland Danielle has been working with youth and their families for over 12 years. She started her career at Spring Ridge Academy, a Therapeutic Boarding School for Girls in Arizona. As a Community Life Director it was her responsibility to help the students and families adjust to their new way of life and assist the students in developing the skills that they were learning in therapy and apply them to everyday life. After leaving SRA she received her Masters in Psychology, focusing on Marriage and Family Therapy. Now she works for JJAB as Resource Specialist, One Circle Facilitator and Coordinator and Restorative Justice Facilitator. Danielle is passionate about the group work that she does and continues to assist students and families in learning new skills to help them thrive as a single unit.
06:48
April 28, 2020
Internet Safety Tips for High School Students with Christine Martinez
Internet Safety Tips for High School Students with Christine Martinez Good Morning JJAB Listeners, my name is Christine Martinez, Youth resource specialist with JJAB. I am here to give you tips in online safety. Being online- connected through some sort of device is how you are currently living your life. As you spend more of your time there, it can be easy to over share, mess up your computer and possibly get messages from creepy people. The truth is there are some risks involved in socializing, playing and communicating online.  Lets talk about how you can protect yourself, your information, and your computer: Protecting yourself:  Use privacy setting to restrict who can see and post on your profile. Many social networking sites, chat rooms and blogs have privacy settings. Find out how to turn these setting on, and then do it.  Limit your online friends to people you know. Learn about location based services. Many phones have GPS technology, and there are applications that let you find out where your friends are… and let them find you. Set your privacy settings so that only people you know personally can see your location. Trust your gut if you feel threatened or uncomfortable because of someone or something you find online. Do you download apps? If you do, you might be giving the apps developers access to your personal information- maybe even info that’s not related to the purpose of the app.  Protect your information: Some information should stay private- Your social security and family financial information should stay private.  Keep your passwords private. The longer your password, the harder to crack. Don’t share your passwords with anybody, including your best friends or your bf or gf.  Don’t reply to text email or pop messages that ask you to reply with personal information. These messages may be fake and sent to steal your information.  Protect your computer:  Be cautious about opening attachments or clicking on links. They may contain viruses or spyware.  Learn about security software and how your computers are protected.  Remember that sometimes, free stuff like games, ring tones, or screen savers can hide viruses and spyware.  Whether its your laptop or phone don’t leave it in public- even for a minute. If it goes missing, all the important information stored on it like your messages and photos may fall into the wrong hands.  Regardless of how fast your fingers fly on a keyboard, phone or tablet the best tool you have to help avoid risks online is your brain. Asking a few questions first can help you protect yourself your friends, and your computer. To find out more in how you can protect yourself online visit:  Onguardonline.gov Commonsensemedia.org. 
04:52
April 27, 2020
Teaching Your Kids About Internet Safety with Rachel-Mohr-Richards
Internet safety ages 8-10 By the time children are 8 to 10 years old, they may be more interested in what older siblings are doing, but they also may begin to develop a sense of their own identity. Virtual worlds, online games, and online videos may be favorite pastimes, but social networking platforms can also come into play at this point. This is also the age parents may begin to introduce personal cell phones to their kids. At this age, children are at a higher risk of communicating with online acquaintances and may be influenced by media personalities and images. When playing in virtual worlds, they may also begin to explore different identities and behaviors. A few practices to consider implementing: Create a shared family email rather than letting them have their own account. If they want to start using social networks, have them manage a family page. This can help them learn and practice privacy and safety skills with guidance from you and older siblings. Preview all websites, games, and apps they wish to use. Familiarize yourself with parental control features on video game systems, tablets, smartphones, and computers. Talk with them about safe and ethical social networking: only adding people you know, for instance. You can also talk about treating people online with kindness and respect, and not adding apps without permission. Talk to them about their online friends and activities in the same way you would about their friends from school.
01:09
April 24, 2020
3 Internet safety tips for Middle school students with William High Eagle Sandoval
How do I protect my kid's privacy online? First, there are two kinds of online privacy. Personal privacy refers to your kid's online reputation, and consumer privacy (also known as customer privacy) refers to the data companies can collect about your kid during an online interaction or transaction. Both are important, and a few simple steps can help parents and kids keep their private information private. The first step is using strict privacy settings in apps and on websites. When you or your kid gets a new device or signs up for a new website or app, establish your privacy preferences. Follow the directions during initial set-up, or go to the section marked "privacy" or "settings" and opt out of things such as location sharing and the ability for the app or website to post to social media sites such as Facebook on your behalf. Encourage kids to read the fine print before checking a box or entering an email address. Although it might not be practical to read through every Terms of Service contract, it's good to remind kids to be aware of what information they're agreeing to share before they start using an app, a website, or a device. Next, teach your kids always to consider the information they're potentially giving away when engaging online. For younger kids, define that information as address, phone number, and birth date. Make sure they understand the basics of good online behavior, too, including thinking about the impact of posting a photo or comment. Remind them that it's not always easy to take back something once it's online and that texts and photos can be forwarded to anyone. Finally, there are some legal restrictions in place to help protect your kids' consumer privacy and insure they're using age-appropriate websites and apps. The Children's Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA) prevents kid-targeted websites and apps from collecting data from kids younger than 13 without parental consent. Tip #2 How can I check to see if my kid signed up for something online? The Internet is full of enticements to sign up for something. Sometimes these come-ons make it sound as if you've won a prize and all you need to do to receive your winnings is register. If your kid registered for an account, downloaded a program, or entered a contest, you may not know unless you notice a new program on your computer. Here's how to get to the bottom of things, starting with the least intrusive: Ask your kid. Explain that there are a lot of scams out there that can spread viruses, so it's important that they ask permission before signing up for something. Check the browser history. Look for telltale words such as "registration page" or "thank you for registering." Check your kid's email. Companies sometimes send a confirmation email to the address used in the sign-up. If your kid is under 13, kid-targeted websites and apps are supposed to get your permission before they collect or use any personal information from your kid (although it's easy for kids to dodge any age restrictions and say they're older). Tip # 3 What are massively multiplayer online games, or MMOs, and are they safe for my kid?
05:20
April 23, 2020
JJAB April 2020 Announcements
JJAB April 2020 Announcements Christine: Food distributions ( LA CARES, Food Depot) Self Help Teen Court (including One circle information, and teen center update) Rachel: Online parenting supports (FSN and Circle of security ) JJAB Gift Card Domestic Violence supports including Crisis numbers and Mental Health updates
16:44
April 14, 2020
Meet Christine Martinez
Christine Martinez was born in El Paso Texas, raised in Mexico, lived in Canada, and settled in the USA. Graduated in 2016 from New Mexico State University with a Social Work degree. Her practice took her to work with a variety of agencies such as geriatric services,  halfway house, and a domestic violence shelter. Currently, she is working with our local youth population as a Youth resource specialist with JJAB. Christine enjoys working with people, and values individuality.  Christine enjoys a good conversation, dancing, singing, and practicing roller derby.  Christine Martinez is not afraid of trying new things, and has a competitive heart.
08:25
March 31, 2020
Meet Rachel Mohr-Richards
Rachel Mohr-Richards moved to New Mexico in 2014 after relocating from Michigan, where she was born and raised.  Rachel graduated from Central Michigan University with a double major in Child Development and Psychology in 2004 and has nine years of experience working with youth and their families, mostly within state child welfare systems in Michigan and New Mexico where she was a CPS investigator and licensing worker.  Rachel joined Los Alamos JJAB in February 2020 and is very excited to be part of this organization.  In her spare time, Rachel enjoys doing Pilates, reading mystery novels, traveling and spending time with her husband, 14 year old daughter and 4 year old son.
03:54
February 21, 2020
Resource specialists March
Into of our resource specialists
01:11
February 17, 2020