Word of the Day

Word of the Day

By Word of the Day
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Word of the Day teaches you a useful word, its definition, etymology, and gives you examples of how to use it in a sentence. A new word each and every day! Perfect for those looking to expand their vocabulary, learning English and looking for a boost and anyone who loves words.

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Aurorean

Word of the Day

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Gainly
Gainly can be an adjective that means graceful. It can also be used as an adverb that means very or completely. Originating in Middle English, the word gain has many meanings. Among other things it can mean ‘to win.’ You can think of gainly as a synonym of ‘winning’ as in, a ‘winning personality.’ Sheila’s gainly demeanor will get her far in life. Everyone loves to be in the company of someone charming and sweet.
00:40
February 22, 2020
Tweedy
Tweedy is an adjective that means academic or scholarly. Tweed is a fabric whose name is of Scots origin. Because tweed is commonly worn by academics, our word of the day came to be a term to describe academics or anything associated with them. You didn’t exactly conjugate that word properly. Sorry to come across tweedy, but as a former college professor, correcting people’s grammar is a habit.
00:39
February 21, 2020
Wieldy
Wieldy is an adjective that means easily handled or managed. To wield something means to ‘hold’ or ‘use’ it. It is related to the German word Walten (VI uh un). Once again, wieldy is spelled WIELDY. You may recognize our word of the day as the positive variation of the word unwieldy. I like how wieldy this tool box is. It’s much easier to carry around than the others I’ve used in the past.
00:37
February 20, 2020
Overslaugh
Overslaugh is a verb that means to pass over in favor of another. Less commonly, it can also be used as a noun that refers to an exemption from duty from the British armed forces. Our word of the day originated in Dutch. The word overslaan (OVE er Shlan) means ‘to skip.’ I think it may be best to overslaugh Henry. I know he’s been with the company the longest, but the newer employees are so much better. Overslaugh is spelled OVERSLAUGH.
00:41
February 19, 2020
Acarpous
Acarpous is an adjective that means sterile  or not producing fruit. Karpos (CAR pose) is the Greek word for fruit. The addition of the prefix A turns it into ‘fruitless.’ Our word of the day may refer to actual food but it may be used to mean any living creature that produces no offspring. It may also be used metaphorically to mean ‘unproductive’ or ‘futile.’ For example: The purpose of the meeting was to generate new ideas for the spring sale, but we couldn’t think of any. I had no idea the meeting would turn out to be so acarpous.
00:49
February 18, 2020
Hermetic
Hermetic is an adjective that means airtight or not affected by outside influence. In Greek mythology, Hermes was the god of science and art. So it makes sense that the scientific discovery of an airtight tube would be credited to him. The word Hermetic is named for him. The word is generally used in a scientific context, but it can also be used more informally as in: if we don’t want the milk to spoil, we should put it into a hermetic container. Using something airtight is the only solution.
00:46
February 17, 2020
Crestfallen
Crestfallen is an adjective that means dispirited or humiliated. Our word of the day began life in the late 16th century, originating with a reference to a mammal or bird having a fallen or drooping crest. An animal’s crest refers to its head. Having a drooping head is an indication that an animal — or person — is dejected. The loss left Harold crestfallen for weeks. You wouldn’t think the results of a ping pong game would be so devastating, but Harold took the sport very seriously.
00:48
February 16, 2020
Sanguine
Sanguine is an adjective that means cheerfully optimistic. It can also be an adjective that means consisting of or related to blood or a noun that refers to a moderate to strong red. The Latin word for blood is sanguis (SAN gwis). From this we get the meaning of ‘blood red’ or ‘related to blood’ as well as our word of the day’s other meaning ‘marked by eager hopefulness.’ In spite of the early results of polling, we remained sanguine about our candidate’s chances. Last year’s election gave us plenty of reason to feel upbeat.
00:48
February 15, 2020
Conduce
Conduce is a verb that means to lead to a particular result. The origin of our word of the day is from the Latin word conducere (cone do CHAIR ay) which means to conduct. I used to smoke six packs a day until I started making an effort to live healthier. Once I realized that smoking doesn’t conduce to a healthy life, I stopped.
00:34
February 14, 2020
Sui generis
Sui generis is an adjective that means of its own kind or unique. Our word of the day is a phrase taken directly from Latin. Its literal translation is ‘of its own kind.’ It’s used to describe people or things that are one of a kind. Max may have had others who looked a lot like him, but when it came to playing his guitar, he was truly Sui generis.
00:41
February 13, 2020
Syncretic
Syncretic is an adjective that means combining different forms of belief or practice. The Greek word synkrētismos (sink ray TISS mos) refers to a federation of Cretan states. By the 19th century, its offspring syncretic had entered English. Although frequently used in a religious context, it may also refer to music, cultures or anything else characterized by a melding of more than one tradition. The music of that tribe is very syncretic. It evolved from the influence of a number of nearby tribes.
00:49
February 12, 2020
Vitiate
Vitiate is a verb that means to corrupt or make ineffective. Our word of the day is derived from the Latin word vitium (VEE tyoom) which means ‘fault’ or ‘moral flaw.’ It shares this root with words like ‘vicious’ and ‘vice.’ But it's not always used in a moral context. For example: For me that awful pie fight scene really vitiates the movie. From that point on, I could not overlook the movie’s flaws.
00:41
February 11, 2020
Cohere
Cohere is a verb that means to be united. Our word of the day comes from the Latin word cohaerēre (koe hay RARE ay) which means ‘to stick together.’ In order for the company to function properly, each office must cohere in purpose. If we don’t stick together, we’ll never get anything done
00:31
February 10, 2020
Etesian
Etesian is an adjective that means occurring every year. The Greek word etos (ETT ose) means year. From this we get our word of the day which first entered English in the early 17th century. These etesian inspections can really be a problem. One year is simply not enough time to get every part of our van in working order.
00:34
February 9, 2020
Pharisaical
Pharisaical is an adjective that means hypocritical. Our word of the day is derived from the Pharisees, an ancient sect that was known among readers of the Bible for having a strict adherence to traditional law but a tendency to behave in pretentious, self-righteous ways. By the 17th century, the word pharisaical had come to English, having come from Greek through Aramaic. Like many politicians, the mayor has been called pharisaical, but I don’t think the charge is fair. He’s very devoted to his faith and he follows its teachings faithfully.
00:55
February 8, 2020
Luddite
Luddite is a noun that refers to a person who avoids the use of new technology. It’s not certain which language our word of the day comes from but we know the term was first used to describe a group of textile mill workers in Nottingham, England in the early 19th century who rioted for the destruction of new machinery that was slowly replacing them. A man known as Ned Ludd seemed to be involved in the movement. In more recent years, the word is used to describe anyone who is opposed to, or uncomfortable with, technology. I used to be a luddite but getting an iPhone for my birthday has cured me. From now on, I’ll never oppose technology again.
00:55
February 7, 2020
Extenuate
Extenuate is a verb that means to lessen the severity of. The Latin word tenuare (TEN ooh are ay) means ‘to make thin.’ Combined with the prefix EX, we get the basis of our word of the day. Extenuate is often used in a legal context as in ‘extenuating circumstances,’ but you don’t need to be in a courtroom to find a use for it. For example: I didn’t think anything could extenuate the damage from the flood. But it turned out that all I had to do was soak up the floor with rags and harm was immediately eased.
00:50
February 6, 2020
Deify
Deify is a verb that means to glorify or worship. The Latin word deus (DAY oos) means ‘god’ and the literal translation of our word of the day is ‘to make a god.’ But the word may be used in a lighter context to simply mean ‘elevate as if a god.’ The people of this town are enormous baseball fans. The day I hit three home runs, everyone wanted to deify me.
00:39
February 5, 2020
Sidereal
Sidereal is an adjective that means related to the stars. The Latin word sidus (SEE doos) means star. This is the origin of our word of the day. If you’ve ever heard the term sidereal time, you know that this phrase refers to a measurement of time based on a motion of the fixed stars. It was lovely to walk home in the sidereal glow of the evening. The light of the stars has always looked so beautiful to me.
00:43
February 4, 2020
Puerile
Puerile is an adjective that means childish or silly. Our word of the day traces its origin to the Latin word puer (POO air) meaning ‘boy’  or ‘child.’ Puerile is basically the adjective form of the word that means ‘like a child.’ But keep in mind that calling someone or something puerile is never a compliment, so think ‘childish’ not ‘childlike.’ I embarrassed myself at work by making a number of puerile comments that day. It isn’t like me to make such silly remarks.
00:48
February 3, 2020
Nebbish
Nebbish is a noun that refers to a timid or submissive person. Our word of the day is one of many words that originated in Yiddish, a language that began as a German dialect with words from Hebrew and several modern languages. Nebbish has evolved from the word for ‘poor’ and ‘unfortunate.’ I was kind of a nebbish as a kid. I didn’t have the courage to stand up for myself at all.
00:38
February 2, 2020
Mephitic
Mephitic is an adjective that means foul-smelling. Our word of the day has its origin in Latin, where the word mephitis (MEH fit iss) means ‘noxious vapor.’ It is also personified as a goddess believed to have the power to avert it. Today mephitis retains its original meaning and mephitic may be used to describe something related to mephitis or it may be used more broadly to refer to anything foul-smelling. I was looking forward to the weekend at the cabin until we reached the mephitic bedroom. That foul scent was a horrible distraction.
00:53
February 1, 2020
Paean
Paean is a noun that means a tribute or thing that expresses enthusiastic praise. According to Greek mythology, Paean was the physician to the gods. The word later came to refer to hymns that were sung to praise the gods. More recently it is used to refer to any tribute — musical or otherwise. The article about the football team was really a paean to its head coach. It praised him for his guidance and wisdom in spite of the team’s pathetic four-and-ten record.
00:43
January 31, 2020
Hegemony
Hegemony is a noun that refers to a dominance or authority over others. The Greek word hēgeisthai (hee GAYE sty) is a verb that means ‘to lead.’ By the mid-16th century the word had been imported into English where it referred to the control once wielded by the ancient Greek states and, in later centuries it was reapplied to other nations that rose to power. In contemporary use, hegemony may refer to any kind of dominance or power. The hegemony of those large conglomerates over smaller business can make things difficult for a small business owner. Under dominance of larger companies, it isn’t easy to find a customer base.
00:56
January 30, 2020
Phalanx
Phalanx is a noun that refers to an organized body of persons. Our word of the day comes directly from Greek where it refers to an infantry of soldiers. More recently it simply refers to a large group of people, usually a group that is united for a singular purpose. The police were intimidated by the phalanx of protesters at the school. A large body of people determined to get change can frighten anyone.
00:40
January 29, 2020
Aeolian
Aeolian is an adjective that means related to or caused by the wind. The Greek god Aeolus is the god of the winds. From this we get our word of the day which may refer either to something caused by the wind or in some way connected to the wind. The windstorm made a huge mess in my backyard last night. All that Aeolian chaos is terrible for my garden.
00:47
January 28, 2020
Cerebrate
Cerebrate is a verb that means to use the mind or reason. You may recognize the Latin derived ‘cerebrum — a synonym of ‘brain’ — as cerebrate’s root word. Our word of the day simply adds the suffix ATE to indicate a state or function. It’s hard to cerebrate with all the noise going on outside. I’ll need more quiet if I hope to put my mind to use.
00:41
January 27, 2020
Achates
Achates is a noun that refers to a faithful friend. Our word of the day comes from an epic poem called Aeneid. In the story, Achates accompanies a Trojan leader named Aeneas everywhere in his adventures. Prior to being featured in the poem by Vergil, both characters originated in Greek mythology. When trying out a new standup comedy routine, I like to rehearse it in front of an Achates or two. Only a faithful friend will have the courage to tell you when you’re not funny.
00:45
January 26, 2020
Prandial
Prandial is an adjective that means related to a meal. The Latin word prandium (PRAHN dee oom) means breakfast. In time it came to refer to any meal. The company outlawed any more prandial meetings. The employees tend to eat so much they run up an outrageously large bill.
00:33
January 25, 2020
Affranchise
Affranchise is a verb that means to set free. You may recognize ‘franchise’ as the root of our word of the day. It comes from the Latin word franc (fronk) meaning ‘free.’ With the addition of the prefix A — which means ‘to’ — it becomes a transitive verb that means something done to someone, as in: After watching a documentary on animal cruelty, Amy affranchised her chickens. Setting them free after years of service seemed like the least she could do.
00:47
January 24, 2020
Disport
Disport is mainly used as a verb that means to divert or amuse, but less commonly, it can be a noun that refers to a sport. Our word of the day is derived from the Latin portare (poor TAR ay) meaning ‘to carry.’ From here, the word picked up the prefix DIS and became disport which meant ‘to carry away,’ ‘comfort’ or ‘entertain.’ This versatile word can refer to a pastime, but in that sense it has been surpassed in popularity by its shortened version ‘sport.’ It can also mean to amuse or divert. For example: These days it’s a little harder to disport kids. It often takes a lot of imagination and money to find something they consider amusing.
00:58
January 23, 2020
Lineament
Lineament is a noun that refers to a distinctive feature -- especially on the face. Linea (LIN ee ah) comes from Latin and means ‘line.’ Keep in mind that a ‘line’ may refer to a straight line or an outline with curves and features that stand out — just as a distinctive nose may stand out in the contour of a person’s face. With his giant chin, it wasn’t difficult to identify Jake after all these years. Decades later that lineament still stands out. Lineament is spelled LINEAMENT.
00:47
January 22, 2020
Sedulous
Sedulous is an adjective that means involving great effort and perseverance. Our word of the day is evolved from the Latin words se dolus (say DOE loose) which mean ‘without guile.’ Over time this evolved into a single word sedulo (say DOO low) meaning ‘diligently’ or ‘sincerely.’ Marcy is a great asset to the company. She’s a sedulous employee who works long and hard to make sure she gets things done right. Once again, sedulous is spelled SEDULOUS.
00:44
January 21, 2020
Asperity
Asperity is a noun that refers to roughness. The Latin word asper (AHH spur) means rough. This word took a lengthy journey through Anglo-French and Middle English and still exists today. It can be found nestled into words like exasperate as well as our word of the day. My father survived a great deal of asperity before he succeeded in life, but he feels that his rough path to prosperity has given him a great deal of character. Asperity is spelled ASPERITY.
00:43
January 20, 2020
Precatory
Precatory is an adjective that means expressing a wish. Precari (pray CAR ee) is the Latin word that means ‘to pray.’ Over time, it has evolved into our word of the day, which is often used in a legal context to indicate something that is desired but not legally binding like a ‘precatory dress code’ in the workplace. It may also be similarly used in an everyday context: My precatory plans were for Ed to water my plants while I went out of town. But I suppose I should have made my wishes more clear before I left.
00:48
January 19, 2020
Oenophile
Oenophile is a noun that refers to a lover of wine. The Greek word for wine oinos (EE nosse) provides roughly half of our word of the day’s origin. The rest is PHILE a suffix of Latin descent that means ‘lover of.’ Rhonda was one of the most knowledgeable oenophiles I’ve ever met. Not only did have a great wine to recommend to me, but she was aware of that wine’s history. Oenophile is spelled OENOPHILE.
00:40
January 18, 2020
Clarion
As a noun, clarion refers to a medieval musical instrument or the clear, shrill noise it makes. As an adjective it means loud and clear. A clarion is a musical instrument known for making a clear, shrill sound. Its name comes from the Latin word clarus (KLAR oos) meaning clear. The sale on winter gloves was a clarion call to me. I understood perfectly well the need to make sure my hands were fully wrapped up before temperatures dropped even further.
00:43
January 17, 2020
Calliopean
Calliopean is an adjective that means loud and piercing. In Greek mythology, the muses were nine sisters who presided over various arts and sciences, with each muse having a different area of expertise. The Muse named Calliope presided over heroic poetry. In time, the word calliope came to be the name of a steam-powered musical instrument known for being extremely loud. The adjective calliopean may refer either specifically to the musical instrument or to anything piercingly loud. Just when I thought I’d found a nice quiet time to take a nap, my son began to practice the drums, creating a calliopean noise and guaranteeing I wouldn’t get a wink of sleep.
01:04
January 16, 2020
Gordian
Gordian is an adjective that means intricate or difficult to solve. It can also be used as a noun that refers to the Gordian knot of legend. According to tales of yore, Gordios (GORE dee ose) the king of Gordium, tied an intricate knot and prophesied that whoever untied it would be the ruler of Asia. It was cut through by the sword of Alexander the Great. Today, the word may still be used when retelling this legend, but it is more likely to be used as a synonym for words like complicated, intricate or convoluted. The health clinic gave great service, but they had a very gordian system. Even something as simple as getting prescribed an aspirin would demand navigating through an elaborate maze of paperwork.
01:00
January 15, 2020
Ersatz
Ersatz is an adjective that means a substitute or imitation. Our word of the day comes directly from German, where it means ‘replacement.’ Ersatz is typically used in a context that implies the replacement is inferior to the real thing. Example: Terry’s ersatz bow tie may have looked convincing to most people, but it didn’t fool me. A real bow tie would have been a much more elegant addition to the evening.
00:41
January 14, 2020
Spartan
Spartan may be used as an adjective that means marked by strict self-discipline. It may also be used as a noun that refers to a person of strict discipline. Our word of the day’s first meaning was as a reference to any resident of the ancient Greek city-state Sparta. Sparta was known for having a highly disciplined way of life for all of its citizens — men and women — to keep them ready for war at any time. In modern times, the word can be a noun that refers to a person with a strict sense of discipline. Here’s an example of the word used in adjective form: As much as I’d love to have a body that resembles Tony’s, his Spartan lifestyle intimidates me. I don’t think I have the discipline needed to engage in as much exercise as he does.
00:59
January 13, 2020
Inosculate
Inosculate is a verb that means to join or unite. The Latin osculare (oh skoo LAHR ay) means ‘to provide with a mouth or outlet.’ Along with the prefix IN inosculate entered English in the late 17th century. It is a synonym of join and unite. I will do my best to inosculate the bicycle’s parts. But I get the feeling that they were not meant to be put together.
00:39
January 12, 2020
Gest
Gest is a noun that refers to a tale or adventure. Our word of the day is not to be confused with jest, JEST, but both words share a common ancestor. The Latin gestus (JEST oos) the past participle of the verb ‘to bear’ or ‘to carry’ has given birth to many words like ingest, suggest and ingest as well as jest with a J and gest with a G. As much as I love Shakespeare’s warm romantic comedies, my favorites are the ones that feature brave men engaged in a gest. There’s something about a good old adventure tale that thrills me.
00:55
January 11, 2020
Ligneous
Ligneous is an adjective that means of or resembling wood. Our word of the day began with the Latin word lignum (LEAN yoom) which simply means ‘wood.’ Its descendant ligneous may be used in a literal sense to refer to actual wood or something that looks like wood, and it may also be used to describe something that is ‘wooden’ in the figurative sense — as in a ‘wooden’ expression. For example: “The Judge’s ligneous expression was a bad sign. Whenever a judge shows no emotion, that means he has an unfavorable sentence to hand down.’
00:51
January 10, 2020
Misprision
Misprision is a noun that means the neglect or wrong performance of official duty. The Latin word prehendere (PREN dare ay) means ‘to seize’ or ‘to take.’ As the word drifted through Middle English, the prefix MIS was added and the word evolved into our word of the day. In addition to its most common meaning, Misprision may be used in a few legal contexts like: ‘concealment of treason or felony by one who is not a participant in the treason or felony’ or ‘seditious conduct against the government or courts.’ When that security guard followed that suspicious man to his car, he may have thought he was helping out, but really he was engaging in an act of misprision. His job was simply to report unusual behavior.
01:04
January 9, 2020
Machinate
Machinate is a verb that means to plot or scheme. Our word of the day is from the Latin Machina (MOCK ee nah) where it roughly translates to ‘machine’ — but its meaning is different than the way ‘machine’ is used in the contemporary sense. Instead it refers to ‘a contrivance’ or ‘something created.’ To machinate is to contrive or create a scheme. The word is often used in a pejorative sense. For example: Keep an eye on Chuck and Joel during the meeting. I have a feeling that the two of them will machinate against the company.
00:50
January 8, 2020
Nestor
Nestor is a noun that refers to one who is the leader in a field. Nestor was a figure from Greek mythology who served as a wise leader in the Trojan war. Today a nestor may refer to anyone known for wisdom and leadership in a particular field. After giving years of service to the theatre word, Harvey has more recently become something of a nestor in that community. He loves the idea of giving to others all the wisdom he’s gained in his forty years of work.
00:42
January 7, 2020
Foible
Foible is a noun that means a minor shortcoming is someone's character. In fencing, the word forte refers to the strongest point of the blade. So understandably, forte became a word to describe a person’s strongest skill or characteristic, as in: Jeff’s forte is public speaking. That’s why he’s done so well performing lectures at college. By contrast, the foible (derived from the Old French word for ‘feeble.’) is the weakest part of the blade. And Foible refers to the person's weakest trait or skill. I don’t know why Mable insists on doing a dance routine for the talent show. Everybody knows dancing is her foible.
00:52
January 6, 2020
Doldrums
Doldrums is a noun that refers to a slump or a state of stagnation. The exact etymology of our word of the day is unknown, but we know it was first used as a nautical term to describe periods of time without strong winds — which was a problem for sailing vessels. Today, the word is used in a similar way to describe periods of stagnation or the absence of inspiration. Without any inspiration, Stacy has been in the doldrums for a while. That’s why she hasn’t painted a masterpiece in a while.
00:45
January 5, 2020
Begrudge
Begrudge is a verb that means to envy or resent someone's good fortune. You may have noticed the word ‘grudge’ nested in our word of the day. Derived from Middle English, grudge is perhaps best known as a noun that means ‘ill will or resentment resulting from a past insult or injury.’ But grudge is also a verb that can mean ‘to be resentfully unwilling to grant or give something.’ Adding the prefix BE to our word of the day gets us to begrudge which can mean ‘to reluctantly give.’ But its most common meaning is ‘to envy or resent someone’s success or fortune.’ The key word with all these is ‘resent.’ I get the feeling Tommy begrudges the success I’ve had at the office. He shook my hand to congratulate me on my raise, but I could tell by the resentment in his eyes that he didn’t mean it.
01:06
January 4, 2020
Shambolic
Shambolic is an adjective that means disorganized or confused. A fairly recent addition to English our word of the day came about in the mid-twentieth century, apparently from the word shambles, meaning ‘a state of total disorder.’ The shambolic state of my son’s room was always a source of puzzlement. I have no idea how I could have a child who has inherited none of my desire for order and neatness.
00:40
January 3, 2020
Promethean
Promethean is an adjective that means boldly defiant or creative. Getting its origin from the Greek God Prometheus known for his daring inventiveness and creativity, our word of the day is often used to describe scientists and inventors who have created something astonishingly new. For example, keep in mind that the novel Frankenstein was first subtitled ‘The Modern Prometheus’ in reference to the mad scientist to brought the dangerous monster to life. Many of the important figures of contemporary science have a promethean quality about them. It often takes a bold temperament to create something that truly shakes up the world.
00:58
January 2, 2020
Connubial
Connubial is an adjective that means related to the state of marriage. Connubial combines the Latin word nubere (new BEAR ay) with the prefix COM, meaning ‘with’ or ‘together.’ After years of marriage, the couple were still thrilled with each other’s presence. It was nice to see their state of connubial bliss was alive and well.
00:35
January 1, 2020
Sagacity
Sagacity is a noun that refers to wisdom or keen judgement. The Latin word sagax (SA gacks) means ‘of quick perception’ or ‘keen.’ This word gave birth to our word of the day as well as ‘sage,’ a word often used to describe.a profound thinker who is eager to share a life of wisdom. When considering the use of sagacity, it may help to remember such a character is the kind with much sagacity. The old wizard was happy to share his sagacity with his student. He felt there was no better use for wisdom than to pass it on to younger people who need it the most.
00:52
December 31, 2019
Embosom
Embosom is a verb that means to shelter closely. Our word of the day is related to the word bosom, a word of Old English origin that means a person’s chest. When used literally, embosom means to ‘take into one’s chest.’ Metaphorically, it means ‘to enclose’ usually in a protective or loving manner. I may have had my differences with Kate over the years, but when she needed help, I was happy to embosom her. I’m always happy to take family into my arms to protect them.
00:44
December 30, 2019
Chimera
Chimera is a noun that refers to a fanciful fabrication or illusion. In Greek mythology, a chimera is a fire-breathing monster that has a lion’s head, a goat’s body and a dragon’s tail. After being slain, this beast continued to live on in people’s imagination. The word later came to refer to any similarly grotesque monster. In more recent years, it refers to something fanciful. My daughter is convinced there are horrible creatures lurking under her bed. When she talks about them, it reminds me of my younger days of being terrified of a number of similar chimeras.
00:53
December 29, 2019
Factotum
Factotum is a noun that refers to someone tasked with many diverse responsibilities. Factotum combines the Latin words facere (FAH chair ay) which means ‘to do’ with the word totum (TOE toom) meaning ‘everything.’ Together we get a word for someone, usually an employee or servant, who does (or seems to do) everything. I had no idea there was so much work involved with being an assistant director on the set. They should have advertised the job as ‘hiring one factotum, qualifications: a willingness to perform an impossible number of tasks on a daily basis.’
00:50
December 28, 2019
Standpat
Standpat is an adjective that means stubbornly resisting change. It can also be a verb that refers to an act of resisting change. Standpat is a term from the game of poker that combines the English words ‘stand’ and ‘pat’ to refer to the act of making no changes to the cards you currently hold. But it may be applied outside of the world of poker to describe a resistance to change when used as an adjective or the act of resisting change when used as a verb. I tend to standpat a lot when playing poker, because I don’t like taking risks in high stakes situation.
00:51
December 27, 2019
Chameleonic
Chameleonic is an adjective that means given to quick or frequent change. A chameleon is a lizard known for its ability to change colors. It gets its name from a combination of the Greek words chamai (HAHM eye) which means ‘on the ground’ and leōn (LAY own) meaning ‘lion.’ Our word of the day is the adjective form of the word that describes someone or something capable of changing colors or some other attribute. Julie may have great principles, but she can be chameleonic when the situation demands it. I’ve seen her change opinions on many topics just to be liked by others.
00:54
December 26, 2019
Canorous
Canorous is an adjective that means pleasant sounding or melodious. Our word of the day’s origin is in the Latin word canere (Can AIR ay) which means ‘to sing.’ It’s often used in a musical context, but it can also be used to describe a lovely sound that has a vaguely music feel to it. For example: Spring is my favorite season. I love waking up to the canorous sounds of the birds collecting outside my window.
00:42
December 25, 2019
Suborn
Suborn is a verb that means to secretly induce (someone) to perform an illegal act. Our word of the day combines the Latin prefix SUB, meaning ‘under’ or ‘secretive’ with ‘ornare’ meaning ‘equip’ or ‘arrange.’ Suborn is frequently used in a legal context, but it may describe any inducement to break the law. Jill was afraid of what might happen if the jury knew the truth about her. So she tried to suborn me to perjure myself on the witness stand.
00:44
December 24, 2019
Percipient
Percipient is an adjective that means having deep insight or understanding. It can also be used as a noun that means ‘one who perceives.’ The Latin word for ‘perceive’ is percipere (PAIR chee paire ay). When used as an adjective, our word of the day is a synonym of ‘discerning,’ as in: when it comes to shopping for my clothes, I trust my wife’s judgement more than mine. She is a very percipient shopper. As a noun, percipient, may refer simply to anyone who perceives things or it may specifically refer to someone with special powers to perceive, such a psychic: Tanya wanted to know where things were headed in her career, so she hired a percipient to read her future.
01:02
December 23, 2019
Malapropism
The word is sometimes shortened to malaprop, which is spelled MALAPROP. Malapropism is a noun that refers to a humorously misused word or phrase. Our word of the day has its origin in a 1775 play called The Rivals. It featured a character named Mrs. Malaprop who had a habit of verbal blunders, such as: ‘He is the very pineapple of politeness.’ The play’s writer, Richard Sheridan created the name from the French term mal à propos (MAL uh pro poh) which means ‘inappropriate.’ The Senator isn’t known for his ability to make people laugh — at least not intentionally. He often gets huge laughs from the occasional malapropism in his speeches.
01:06
December 22, 2019
Aurorean
Aurorean is an adjective that means of or belonging to the dawn. Fans of Roman mythology may know that Aurora was the Roman Goddess of the dawn. The word aurora still refers to this time in the morning. Our word of the day is an adjective that refers to anything related to the dawn. The early mornings in this town are stunning. I could stare at the aurorean glow across for several minutes.
00:41
December 21, 2019
Expiate
Expiate is a verb that means to make amends for. Our word of the day began life with the Latin word expiare, which means ‘to atone for.’ Before arriving in contemporary English, it had other meanings. Shakespeare (and others in his time) used the word to mean ‘to put an end to.’ But more recently, expiate is typically used in a context related to guilt or guilty behavior. For example: Tom felt guilty for embezzling his company’s money, but he feels a great deal better after repaying the company the money. It felt refreshing to expiate for his crime.
00:51
December 20, 2019
Scandent
Scandent is an adjective that means climbing or ascending. Coming from the Latin word scandere (SCON dare ay) meaning ‘to climb,’ our word of the day is frequently used to describe plants like vines that climb while growing. But it may also be used figuratively. For example:  in all my years in law, I’ve never met anyone more ambitious and eager to reach the top of the legal world as Laura. Whenever we find someone that scandent, it is vital that we hire them right away.
00:42
December 19, 2019
Cordate
Cordate is an adjective that means heart-shaped. The Latin word cordi (CORE dee) means heart. Keep in mind that a cordate object is not shaped like an actual heart, but is instead shaped like the perfectly symmetrical image we see, for example, represented on valentine’s day cards. When I was in a more romantic mood, I thought a cordate tattoo on my forearm would be nice. But more recently I think a picture of a dragon would be more fitting to my personality.
00:43
December 18, 2019
Bon vivant
Bon vivant is a noun that refers to a person who enjoys the good things in life. Our word of the day comes to us directly from the French, where its literal translation is ‘good liver,’ as in ‘one who lives well.’ In particular, a bon vivant is someone with refined tastes in food and drink. As a teenager, I thought of myself as something of a bon vivant, but I now realize I was mistaken. Knowing where to get the best curly fries in town is hardly the mark of a person with refined, sophisticated tastes.
00:49
December 17, 2019
Reprehend
Reprehend is a verb that means to voice disapproval of. The Latin word hendere (HEN dare ay) means ‘to seize’ or ‘to grasp.’ Our word of the day combines this with the prefix RE, which means ‘back’ and PRE meaning ‘before.’ I don’t like to be judgmental about my daughter’s taste in music. But when I heard that nonsense coming from the stereo in her bedroom, I felt compelled to reprehend her choices.
00:44
December 16, 2019
Basilic
Basilic is an adjective that means royal or of great importance. The Greek word basilikḗ (BAH seal eek) means ‘royal building.’ As the word evolved through Latin and French, it retained the same basic meaning. To this day, a basilica may refer to a giant church. Our word of the day has a broader meaning that may refer to anything of giant significance. Our boss is constantly reminding us of the basilic nature of this recent exhibit. He says its success would greatly enhance the museum’s reputation.
00:45
December 15, 2019
Euchre
Euchre is a verb that means to cheat or trick. The precise etymology of our word of the day is not known, but we do know it was, and is, the name of a card game in which a person has to win three tricks to win a hand. Those who dishonestly prevent someone from winning three tricks are cheating. From this origin, comes euchre’s definition of ‘to swindle.’ That guy I met at the racetrack, seemed trustworthy, like someone who would never cheat me out of money. But he later tried to euchre me out of my life savings, by offering to sell me the Statue of Liberty.
00:48
December 14, 2019
Distend
Distend is a verb that means to extend or stretch. The Latin word tendere (TEN dare ay) means ‘to stretch.’ By combining it with the prefix ‘DIS’ meaning ‘apart,’ we get the basis for our word of the day. Distend may be used in a medical context to refer to, for example, ‘a distended finger,’ or it can refer to something a person does, as in: I would like to distend our tent so that all five people may fit inside. If we aren’t able to stretch it out, we might have to cancel our trip.
00:44
December 13, 2019
Repletion
Repletion is a noun that refers to the condition of being filled to excess. Repletion comes from the Latin repletionem (rep play TONE aim) meaning ‘to fill.’ While the word has retained this definition, it has over the years, acquired the additional meaning of ‘a state of being filled to excess.’ This is true whether the ‘filled’ object is a room or a belly, as in ‘I can’t recall ever feeling the repletion I’ve felt after yesterday’s dinner. I ate so much, I may not get hungry again until next week. Once again, repletion is spelled REPLETION.
00:48
December 12, 2019
Officious
Officious is an adjective that means meddlesome or overly eager to offer unwanted advice. Our word of the day comes almost directly from the Latin word ‘officiosus (oh fish ee OH soos) meaning ‘obliging’ or ‘eager to serve.’ But in more recent centuries, officious has also come to mean ‘doing more than is asked or expected’ or ‘meddlesome.’ An example of the second meaning is: Larry is a great assistant, but he can get a little officious at times. For example, a few weeks ago, he not only delivered flowers to my wife when we had an argument, but he also apologized on my behalf.
00:53
December 11, 2019
Desuetude
Desuetude is a noun that means discontinuance from use or exercise. Our word of the day is a distant relative of the Latin verb suescere (sue ay SHARE ay) meaning ‘to accustom.’ With the prefix DE — which means ‘away’ — the word later evolved to mean ‘a state of not being used.’ Desuetude is a synonym of disuse, but its more ‘old world’ sound may make it a more appropriate word when you need something more sentimental. For example: In my younger days, I rode my bike all the time. But since buying my car a few years ago, my reliable old 10-speed has fallen into desuetude.
00:56
December 10, 2019
Celerity
Celerity is a noun that refers to swiftness or speed. The Latin word celer (SAY lare) means ‘swift’ or ‘speedy.’ Its distant relative, celerity is best used in a context that refers to the speed of motion. For example: I always suspected Susan would have the necessary skills to be a great basketball player. The celerity of her movements are perfect for the sport.
00:40
December 9, 2019
Probative
Probative is an adjective that means done for the purpose of testing or trying. Probative is derived from the Latin word probare (pro BAR ay) meaning ‘to prove’ or ‘to test.’ Depending on its context, it can either be a synonym of exploratory or it can mean ‘intending to confirm.’ An example of the first meaning would be: After our probative additions to the menu, we determined that our customers didn’t like curly fries with their meal, after all. For the second meaning an example is: The doctors were fairly certain that I was fine. After a few probative tests, they confirmed that I was.
00:51
December 8, 2019
Rebus
Rebus is a noun that refers to a representation of a word using pictures or symbols. In Latin, rebus is the plural of res (RACE) meaning ‘thing’ or ‘object.’ This later came to refer to the objects that appear in ancient writing such as hieroglyphics. But it may also refer to more recent puzzle games where players try to guess a word by glancing at objects. Being a very visual person, I love playing rebus games. It’s always challenging to guess a word’s meaning from visual clues.
00:44
December 7, 2019
Derogate
Derogate is a verb that means to belittle or disparage. Derogate’s roots are similar to that of the word derogatory, which means ‘showing a critical or disrespectful attitude.’ Both words are derived from the Latin derogare (dare oh GAR ay) meaning ‘to detract.’ But derogate is a more appropriate word when looking for a verb instead of an adjective. For example: I hope Lester didn’t feel I was trying to belittle his contribution to the company. My intention was to encourage him to do better, not to derogate him.
00:46
December 6, 2019
Brio
Brio is a noun that means enthusiasm or vigor. Our word of the day is what is known as a loan word, meaning ‘a word adopted from a foreign language with little or no modification.’ Brio is from Italian, and in English it maintains its meaning of ‘vivacity’ or ‘enthusiasm.’ The band director felt I my performance was flat and unenthusiastic. He encouraged me to bring more brio into my playing.
00:36
December 5, 2019
Herculean
Herculean is an adjective that means requiring great strength. Those familiar with Greek mythology may have heard of the son of Zeus named Hercules known for his extraordinary strength. Our word of the day is often used to describe a task that requires such extraordinary strength, for example: I wasn’t prepared for how heavy Martha’s harp was. After trying to lift it, I soon discovered what a herculean task it was.
01:17
December 4, 2019
Endogenous
Endogenous is an adjective that means originating from within. The Greek prefix E-N-D-O means ‘from within.’ And Genous (JEN ose) means ‘producing.’ Endogenous is frequently — but not exclusively — used in a scientific or medical context. The patient didn’t seem to pick up the illness from any outside sources. So we surmised that an endogenous virus was the cause.
00:40
December 3, 2019
Atrophy
Atrophy is a noun that refers to a wasting away. It can also serve as a verb that means ‘to waste away.’ The literal translation of our word of the day, from the Greeks is ‘lack of nourishment.’ But in more recent years, atrophy often takes on a more metaphorical meaning that has nothing to do with actual food. A person’s muscles can atrophy if they haven’t been used for a while and the same can happen to job skills that have been dormant. As a kid I spoke fluent Italian. But it’s been so long since I’ve spoken any of the language that my Italian has atrophied a great deal.
00:51
December 2, 2019
Excursus
Excursus is a noun that refers to a digression on a particular point. From Latin, we get the word excurrere (EKS coo air ay) which refers to a digression. Our word of the day has undergone a number of changes, but its meaning remains the same. Don’t be put off by the formal sound of excursus. It’s a perfect word to use when talking about something written or expressed by a formal lecturer or writer. Professor Mitchel’s history lecture was lovely except for the excursus about president Cleveland’s policies. That kind of lengthy digression on politics can often be a distraction.
00:51
December 1, 2019
Inveterate
Inveterate is an adjective that means stubbornly established by habit. The Latin word vetus (VAY toos) means ‘old.’ In the past, our word of the day was simply a synonym of ‘long-standing’ or ‘old,’ but in more recent years, its meaning has shifted to refer to something that remains around because of habit. Shaking hands when meeting someone is an inveterate gesture in our society. But the centuries of habit that created this custom has not been as common in other cultures, which is why some third world countries find this greeting strange.
00:51
November 30, 2019
De rigueur
De rigueur is an adjective that means required by custom or etiquette. Coming directly from French, de rigueur’s literal translation is ‘of strictness,’ but a better way to understand it is to think of it as meaning ‘according to obligation or convention.’ There was a time when wearing a hat in public was de rigueur for men. There was really no reason for this except for social custom.
00:43
November 29, 2019
Devolve
Devolve is a verb that means to transfer or be passed on to another. Our word of the day is often thought of as the opposite of the word evolve, and it is true that, like evolve, its origin is in the Latin word volvere (VOL vair ay) meaning ‘rolling.’ The addition of the prefix D-E, meaning ‘down’ gets us a word that means ‘rolling down.’ So devolve may mean ‘to degenerate through change or evolution.’ And it also refers to a right or responsibility that ‘rolls down’ from one person to the next. For example: Handling the Johnson account has devolved from my boss to me. I am now accountable for whatever happens in this case.
00:56
November 28, 2019
Intractable
ntractable is an adjective that means not easily managed or controlled. The Latin word tractabilis (tract uh BEEL us) roughly translates to ‘manageable.’ With the addition of the prefix I-N, meaning ‘not’  we get ‘that which can not be managed. Our word of the day has a wide range of uses and may refer to people, ideas or even policies: The intractable economic changes created by Senator Blair have thrown our society into chaos. We’d be far better off with policies that are easily managed.
00:50
November 27, 2019
Mercurial
Mercurial is an adjective that means characterized by rapid, unpredictable change. Our word of the day shares its roots with a planet and a Roman god. Mercury was Rome’s equivalent to the Greek god Hermes, and was known for being eloquent and ingenious. When mercurial entered the English language in the 14th century, the word was used to describe someone possessing these qualities. In time its meaning shifted to ‘unpredictable’ and ‘changeable’ in reference to the chemical used in thermometers, known for its quick changes as it rises and falls to reflect the temperature. I was hoping we could hire a basketball coach who was a little more predictable and stable than our previous one. Coach Derringer’s mercurial nature was a real detriment to the team.
01:40
November 26, 2019
Vacuous
Vacuous is an adjective that means empty or lacking content. Coming from the Latin word vacuus (vah KOOS) meaning ‘empty’ our word of the day shares its roots with words like vacuum, evacuate and vacant. It often refers to ideas or thoughts that are empty in a metaphorical sense, meaning they have no intelligent content behind them. I was disappointed by professor Harold’s lecture. It contained mostly vacuous catchphrases but very few actual ideas.
00:44
November 25, 2019
Bugbear
Bugbear is a noun that means an object of fear or dread. Our word of the day entered English in the 16th century where it was used by writers of scary tales. It combined the word ‘bug,’ which referred a goblin and ‘bear’ to conjure up an imaginary creature designed to scare children. These days it refers to anything that serves as an object that is feared or dreaded. Example: Trips to the dentists have always been Chad’s bugbear. He’s so afraid of them that he hasn’t seen one for years.
00:49
November 24, 2019
Solecism
Solecism is a noun that means a blunder in speech. The city of soloi was known for the bad grammar of its inhabitants known as solikos (SO loy kos). This gave birth to the word soloikismos (solo KIZZ moss) meaning, ‘an ungrammatical combination of words,’ which later became the basis for our word of the day. In more recent years, solecism has also come to refer to a social blunder as well as a verbal blunder. Being the press secretary for a politician who commits many solecisms can be a thankless job. It usually means making lots of apologies for a wide range of blunders.
00:53
November 23, 2019
Yeasayer
Yeasayer is a noun that means someone with a positive attitude. You may have heard of the word naysayer, a noun referring to a person constantly denying or opposing things. Conversely, a yeasayer may refer to an upbeat, positive person known for saying ‘yes’ to things. Its less flattering meaning is a person always agreeing with or being submissive to other people, as in: It makes sense that Dennis would hire a yeasayer like Chuck as his assistant. There is nothing he loves more than having someone cater to all his wishes.
00:50
November 22, 2019
Niveous
Niveous is an adjective that means related to or resembling snow. The Latin word ‘nix’ (NEEKS uh) means snow. Niveous, a word that entered English in the early 17th century, may refer either to a large quantity of snow or something that resembles snow. The niveous look of dad’s graying beard gives him a Santa Claus look. If his beard were any whiter we might be tempted to shovel his face.
00:40
November 21, 2019
Aver
Aver is a verb that means to declare. Our word of the day is a combination of the Latin words ‘ad,’ meaning ‘to’ and verus (VARE oos) meaning ‘real’ or ‘true.’ To aver something is to declare it to be true, for example: my client will aver that he is innocent of all charges. I’m confident that the jury will be moved by this declaration of his innocence.
00:34
November 20, 2019
Inexorable
Inexorable is an adjective that means not to be persuaded, moved or stopped. The Latin word exorabilis (ex or uh BEE lees) means flexible or lenient. If we add the prefix I-N, for ‘not,’ we get a word that means ‘inflexible’ or ‘unyielding.’ The word is more frequently used to describe things than people, for example: The inexorable trend of bigger budgets in movies has made things difficult for a low budget producer. Much as Max would like the days of lower budgets to return, that seems an impossible dream.
00:53
November 19, 2019
Velutinous
Velutinous is an adjective that means soft and smooth like velvet. The Latin word for velvet is velutum (vel LOOT oom), which also provides the origin for our word of the day, velutinous. Something described as velutinous isn’t necessarily connected to velvet though. It may simply be soft and smooth like velvet. I always seem to fall asleep in those movie theater seats. Something about that velutinous cover on them just sends me to dreamland in a few minutes.
00:48
November 18, 2019
Fussbudget
Fussbudget is a noun that refers to a person who worries about unimportant things. Our word of the day is a combination of the words ‘fuss,’ meaning ‘to show unnecessary concern’ and ‘budget,’ which refers to ‘an estimate of income and expenditures needed for a period of time.’ Together they create a word for somebody who worries needlessly about minor things — like a budget. My grandpa can be a fussbudget at times. When I took him to lunch he spent the whole time fretting about how much cheaper the meal would have been if we had eaten it at his favorite diner in Miami.
00:52
November 17, 2019
Newspeak
Newspeak is a noun that means deliberately ambiguous language designed to deceive. Author George Orwell first coined the word newspeak for his dystopian novel nineteen eighty four. It described a new language designed to manipulate people into believing lies. Today the word isn’t generally used to refer to a new language but simply to mean words meant to deceive. Carl can’t bear to watch the news on that channel. He insists that their newscasters are speaking in newspeak.
00:48
November 16, 2019
Inscape
Inscape is a noun that refers to a person's inner character. Our word of the day combines the prefix I-N, for ‘inner’ and the suffix ‘scape’ which refers to a specific kind of scene, as in ‘landscape,’ ‘moonscape,’ or ‘cityscape.’ Inscape was first coined in the mid-19th century by a writer named Gerald Manley Hopkins in reference to poetry. The word is still often used to describe works of art: I loved the character of Marlene in your play. I felt she beautifully captured the inscape of a young woman coming of age in Victorian England.
00:51
November 15, 2019
Impend
Impend is a verb that means to be about to happen. It may surprise you to learn that our word of the day is a close relative of the word pendant. Both words came from the Latin word pendere (PEN dare ay) which means ‘to hang.’ The best way to sort this confusion out is to consider that a pendant hangs from a chain that hangs around a neck, while something that impends hangs metaphorically over your head in a threatening way. I get more and more stressed out as the deadline approaches. Feeling it impend that way makes me nervous.
00:46
November 14, 2019
Obvert
Obvert is a verb that means to turn so as to present a different view. Our word of the day combines the prefix O-B meaning ‘toward’ with the Latin word vertere (Vare TEAR ay) meaning ‘to turn.’ The result gives us a word to describe turning to display another angle. It may also mean ‘to alter the appearance of’ as in: Cindy was almost unrecognizable after her trip to the spa. I didn’t expect them to obvert her so dramatically.
00:44
November 13, 2019
Mooncalf
Mooncalf is a noun that means a foolish or absent-minded person. The exact origin of our word of the day is something of a mystery, but some believe it may have been derived from the German word Mondkalb (MOON kype) which means a ‘fleshy mess.’ It was also believed that a mooncalf was deformed because of the influence of the moon. Regardless of its origin, the word came to mean an idiotic person, a meaning it continues to hold on to today. Bridget may be smart, but she has moments where she can really be a mooncalf. The other day, for example, she asked me what night Monday night football was on.
00:54
November 12, 2019
Quiescent
Quiescent is an adjective that means at rest. The Latin quiēscere (kwee ACE sare ay) means ‘to be quiet’ or ‘to rest.’ A person or thing that quiescent is at rest or dormant. Don’t worry about that grizzly bear out back. He’ll be quiescent for the next few hours, so he won’t be able to bother you.
00:35
November 11, 2019
Stolid
Stolid is an adjective that means not easily moved. Don’t be misled by out word of the day’s origin. It comes from the Latin stolidus (STOW lee doos) which means stupid. But a stolid person isn’t necessarily lacking in intelligence. Instead it referred to people who appear stupid because they say nothing. More recently the word has shed any connection to stupidly and is more likely to be used as a synonym of ‘unemotional’ or ‘stoic.’ Kevin’s demeanor remained stolid throughout the movie. I got the impression that he wasn’t moved by it at all.
00:47
November 10, 2019
Bogart
Bogart is a verb that means to bully or take more that ones fair share. Hollywood legend Humphrey Bogart was known for playing rough, highly intimidating characters. In recent years his name has become a verb to describe the behavior befitting such characters. Charles tried to Bogart his way into the restaurant. But unfortunately, the restaurant security would not allow themselves to be bullied.
00:38
November 9, 2019
Highbinder
Highbinder is a noun that means a swindler or gangster. Not much is known about the exact origin of our word of the day, but, highbinder seems to have been the name of a 19th century gang. Our word of the day may refer specifically to a professional killer operating in the Chinese quarter of an American city or it may refer, more broadly to a person — usually a politician — who has engaged in some form of corruption. George’s reputation as a highbinder could cause problems in the next election. Voters may be cautious of someone with a history of corruption.
00:53
November 8, 2019
Copper-Bottomed
Copper-bottomed is an adjective that means reliable. Our word of the day combines two common English words ‘copper’ and ‘bottomed.’ In a literal sense it simply refers to something that is coated with copper — a very firm metal — on the bottom. But in a more metaphorical sense it refers to something that is solid like Copper and that comes with a guarantee. I was told I had just purchased a copper-bottomed stock. As guaranteed, the stock shot up shortly after my buying it.
00:49
November 7, 2019
Senectitude
Senectitude is a noun that refers to old age. Our word of the day is an appropriately old word. The Latin word senectus (SEN eck toos) means old age. As my parents near their senectitude, we are contemplating the best way to take care of them. These are the kinds of decisions that must be made for the elderly.
00:38
November 6, 2019
Satisfice
Satisfice is a verb that means to accept an available option as satisfactory. Our word of the day is a blend of satisfy and suffice, two English words of Latin origin.Understanding satisfice as a mix of these words may help understand its best use. I told my kids never to safistice with their education. They should always press to learn way more than the bare minimum.
00:40
November 5, 2019
Superlunary
Superlunary is an adjective that means beyond the moon. From the Latin Luna (LOO nah) we get moon. And from the Latin super (SOO pair) we get ‘above’ or ‘beyond.’ As a kid, I wondered if we’d ever put an astronaut any place beyond the moon. Today superlunary space travel is very much within reach.
00:38
November 4, 2019
Argot
Argot is a noun that refers to the jargon or slang of a particular group. Borrowed from the French in the mid 19th century, our word of the day refers to the ‘language’ of a particular group. But don’t be misled by the term ‘language.’ German is not an argot, but cyberspeak is. Ed tends to get confused by the argot his grandkids use. When he heard that Tommy’s house was ‘lit,’ he called the fire department.
00:39
November 3, 2019
Nisus
Nisus is a noun that refers to a mental or physical effort to attain an end. Nisus comes directly from the Latin (NEEZ zoos) where its pronunciation may differ a little from its English   descendant, but its meaning has remained roughly the same. A nisus is an effort, but more specifically, it one to reach a particular goal. No matter what nisus he employed, Larry simply couldn’t finish the race. It bothered him to fall short of his goal in spite of his best efforts.
00:42
November 2, 2019
Evince
Evince is a verb that means to display. Our word of the day comes from the Latin word vincere (VEEN chair ay) which means ‘conquer’ or ‘win.’ But before you get carried away, keep in mind that the victories evince indicates take place not on a battlefield, but in the realm of a conversation or perhaps a legal trial. A person may ‘win’ a dispute when information is evinced. When those cookies went missing, we weren’t sure who the culprit was. But the smell of chocolate chip on our little puppy’s breath evinced his guilt.
00:48
November 1, 2019
Fulgurant
Fulgurant is an adjective that means flashing like lighting. The Latin fulgur (FOOL goor)  means ‘lightning.’ Our word of the day is usually used metaphorically to refer to a powerful brilliant flash — but not necessarily to refer to actual lightning. The coach’s words struck me with fulgurant force. Those five words — ‘you’re cut from the team’ — didn’t take long to say, but their powerful impact wounded me deeply.
00:44
October 31, 2019
Edenic
Edenic is an adjective that means Like a paradise. Coming from Hebrew, our word of the day has its origin in the Biblical Garden of Eden, a place of great happiness and unspoiled paradise. Our word of the day may describe something that refers specifically to the Garden of Eden, or more broadly, to anything that resembles paradise. I found that beach property to be edenic. Everything about it was perfect in every way.
00:40
October 30, 2019
Sinewy
Sinewy is an adjective that means tough or forceful. In anatomy, a sinew is a piece of tough fibrous tissue uniting muscle to bone or bone to bone. When used figuratively, sinewy may simply mean ‘lean’ or ‘spare’ as in the novelist’s writing wasn’t littered with unnecessary words. When done well, hat type of sinewy prose can captivate a reader.
00:39
October 29, 2019
Bromidic
Bromidic is an adjective that means commonplace or trite. The chemical bromide’s etymology is of unknown origin, but we do know that bromide is a sedative used medicinally. When used metaphorically, something bromidic may not actually put you to sleep, but it may bore you — as trite, cliche things often do. Our coach loved to deliver these bromidic speeches consisting of tedious cliches. Far from inspiring us, those speeches just bored us.
00:46
October 28, 2019
Osmotic
Osmotic is an adjective that means having the properties of osmosis (a gradual assimilation of knowledge). The Greek word Omos (OSE mose) means ‘thrusting’ or ‘pushing.’ You could say that when something osmotic is taking place, it is being thrust or pushed in some sense or other. When the word is used in a medical sense, it refers to something being pushed through a membrane. But used in an everyday context, an osmotic process may simply be something effortlessly or unconsciously assimilated, for example: Cheryl never took a music lesson. But there is something osmotic about the way she learned to play the violin as a result of growing up in a musical family.
00:56
October 27, 2019
Actuate
Actuate is a verb that means to put into action or motion. The Latin word actus (OCK toos) meaning ‘a doing’ is parent to many English words including act, actor, actual and activate, a word similar to our word of the day. It’s often used to describe the act of putting machinery into motion. I think the copy machine is broken. When I tried to actuate it, it didn’t do anything.
00:40
October 26, 2019
Catchpenny
Catchpenny is an that means using sensationalism for appeal. First coined in the 18th century, catchpenny may be best understood as a synonym of sensationalistic. For example: My grandfather was an writer of catchpenny biographies. His books were poorly researched and not very skillfully written, but they made money because of the popular subjects.
00:40
October 25, 2019
Nephalism
Nephalism is a noun that refers to the total abstinence from alcohol. The Greek word nēphein (NEF fine) means ‘drink no wine.’ From this beginning our word of the day was born. All of the free drinks on the cruise will make it difficult to maintain nephalism. I’m not sure I can make it eleven days without a drop of alcohol.
00:35
October 24, 2019