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Zora's Daughters

Zora's Daughters

By Zora's Daughters
Following the legacy of Zora Neale Hurston and other Black women ethnographers, we bring a critical anthropological lens to popular topics. We aim to combat the erasure and silencing of Black women’s voices and experiences through discussion and upliftment of each other.
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S2, E4 Fleeing The Plantation
We're reimagining Black feminism and fugitivity, y'all! In this episode, Alyssa and Brendane are joined by graduate student and educator Naomi Simmons-Thorne. Together, they unpack fugitivity, bridging the bifurcation in Black feminist theory, the attack on CRT, fugitive pedagogy, and and COVID in the classroom. What's the Word? Fugitivity. We discuss the development of fugitivity and debate who and how people can practice fugitivity. What We're Reading. "Black Feminist Theory and its Wayward Futures" by Naomi Simmons-Thorne. We're joined by Naomi to discuss her paper where she maps the relationship between the divergent Black feminist paradigms and offers a bridge that tells us we don't have to choose. What In the World?! Together we discuss the attack on critical race theory and what we're actually witnessing: fighting against antiracism and critical consciousness in education, fugitive pedagogy and Brendane's experiences as a science teacher to low income Black and brown students, and how the state is sacrificing children for the sake of the profits of the few. Liked what you heard? Donate here! Discussed this week: "Black Feminist Theory and its Wayward Futures"  (Naomi Simmons-Thorne, forthcoming) Fugitive Pedagogy: Carter G. Woodson and the Art of Black Teaching (Jarvis R. Givens, 2021) ZD merch available here and the syllabus for ZD 201 is here! Let us know what you thought of the episode @zorasdaughters on Instagram and @zoras_daughters on Twitter! Transcript will be available on our website here.
01:29:28
October 13, 2021
S2, E3 600 Years A Slave
We may have left the plantation, but the plantation never left us! In this episode Brendane and Alyssa unpack afterlives, the plantation, futurity, and the singularity that continues to shape the present: slavery. In our introduction we take a moment to remember the late Dr. Steven Gregory, Professor of Anthropology and the inaugural Dr. Kenneth and Kareitha Forde Professor of African American and African Diaspora Studies at Columbia University. What's The Word? Afterlife. Through the work of Christina Sharpe and Saidiya Hartman, we give a brief overview of what people mean when they talk about the "afterlives" of slavery (or other systems or structures). What We're Reading Plantation Futures by Katherine McKittrick. Both of the Daughters had this essay on their exam lists so it was a treat to read! We discuss the ways the plantation is still with us, simultaneously holding the history of racial violence and the key to possibilities for Black life, the co-construction of place and identity, the plot and the plantation, and other kinds of afterlives. What In the World?! Critiquing the Plantationocene, Border Patrol and Black Asylum Seekers, Missing White Women Syndrome. We talk about how the attention to multispecies and regionalization of the plantation flattens difference and erases Black feminist studies of the plantation, the attention to the object (the whip) and the event (border patrol chasing asylum seekers) serve to distract us from the deeper historical and political pattern, and a brief foray into Missing White Women Syndrome. Liked what you heard? Donate here! Discussed this week: Plantation Futures (Katherine McKittrick, 2013) Borders, Blackness, and Empire (Jemima Pierre, 2021) The Racial Reckoning That Wasn't (Code Switch, 2021) ZD merch available here and the syllabus for ZD 201 is here! Let us know what you thought of the episode @zorasdaughters on Instagram and @zoras_daughters on Twitter! Transcript will be available on our website here.
01:10:30
September 29, 2021
S2, E2 Big Girl, Small World
In this episode, Alyssa and Brendane unpack questions of fatphobia, anti-blackness, and how that intersects with the discursive. For What's the Word?, we discuss discourse to understand how understandings of the world circulate, of course referencing one of our fave French philosophers: Michel Foucault. Today, we read the essay "Fat, Black, and Ugly: The Semiotic Production of Prodigious Femininities" (2021) by Professor Krystal A. Smalls, which explores several ways fatness and Blackness are discursively constructed as social comorbidities for feminine people and examines how this discourse affects lived experience. Through this lens, we talk about how fatness was wielded against Eric Garner, Michael Brown, and Ma'Khia Bryant. In What In the World?! we discuss the latest scandal involving the teen clothing brand Brandy Melville and accusations of anti-blackness and fatphobia, unpack why these -phobias are not specifically about fear (except maybe psychoanalytically!), bias against fat people in the medical system including our own experiences, why commenting on people's bodies is not "caring" for them, Lizzo living her best life, and how loving ourselves and our bodies is a journey. If you’ve experienced weight bias in health care and in other contexts can complete the Weight Bias Reporting Form created by the Obesity Action Coalition. CW: Throughout the episode we discuss body image issues and bias against fat bodies. Please take care of yourself as you need while listening. Liked what you heard? Donate here! Discussed this week: Fat, Black, and Ugly: The Semiotic Production of Prodigious Femininities (Krystal A. Smalls, 2021) I’m a Parkland Shooting Survivor. QAnon Convinced My Dad It Was All a Hoax. (David Gilbert, 2021) Weighing the care: physicians' reactions to the size of a patient (M.R. Hebl and J. Xu, 2001) ZD merch available here and the syllabus for ZD 201 is here! Let us know what you thought of the episode @zorasdaughters on Instagram and @zoras_daughters on Twitter! Transcript will be available on our website here.
01:06:16
September 15, 2021
S2, E1 Liberation Don't Cost a Thang
The revolution will not be sold! We're back with the first episode Season 2! In today's episode, Brendane and Alyssa share what they got up to over the summer break and then jump right into the episode unpacking the philosophical concept of Aesthetics and how it is bound up in politics and power. In the What We're Reading segment, the pair discuss Angela Davis' 1994 essay "Afro Images: Politics, Fashion, and Nostalgia" to think about the ways society refashions the revolutionary past - in this instance how Davis' afro goes from symbol of resistance to fashion statement, evacuating her contribution to Black radicalism through commodification. In What In the World?! Brendane and Alyssa discuss Tiffany's new "About Love" campaign that features Jay-Z, Beyonce, a rarely viewed Basquiat, and a priceless blood diamond. Finally, they touch on the issues and contradictions of the activist-influencer industrial complex through the recent events with the Jessica Natale (formerly @soyouwanttotalkabout on IG) and bestselling author Ijeoma Oluo. Liked what you heard? Donate here! Discussed this week: Afro Images: Politics, Fashion, and Nostalgia (Angela Davis, 1994) "Corporate America's $50 billion Promise" (Washington Post, 2021) Other Readings: The Politics of Aesthetics (Jacques Rancière, 2013) ZD merch available here and the syllabus for ZD 201 is here! Let us know what you thought of the episode @zorasdaughters on Instagram and @zoras_daughters on Twitter! Transcript will be available on our website here.
01:31:58
September 1, 2021
S1, E20 Black Like Kim: On Cultural Appropriation
Cultural appropriation is not the sincerest form of flattery! On today's episode, Alyssa and Brendane tackle the slippery concept that is cultural appropriation. In What's The Word? they tackle the age old anthropological question of what is "culture," and explain what cultural appropriation most certainly is not. What We're Reading for this episode is bell hooks' "Eating the Other: Desire and Resistance" to unpack how cultural appropriation serves a double duty, simultaneously reinforcing the power and dominance of the appropriator and it diminishing the value of the appropriated by objectifying and exoticizing elements of their way of life. In the What in the World?! segment, we discuss some reader questions and talk about Kahlil Greene's TikTok series “How everything Gen Z does originated with Black people,” white women twerking and saying 'gang gang,' and the new film In The Heights by Lin-Manuel Miranda. Also, the book Alyssa mentions about red beans is actually Rice and Beans: A Unique Dish in a Hundred Places edited by Richard Wilk and Livia Barbosa. Oops! Thank you all for an incredible year of the podcast! We'll be back in September with a new semester. In the meantime, take care of yourself and each other. Asé P.S. Our episode art this week was inspired by Sha'Carri Richardson, future Olympian! Liked what you heard? Donate here! Discussed this week: Eating the Other: Desire and Resistance (bell hooks, 1992) The Ethics of Cultural Appropriation (James O. Young and Conrad G. Brunk, 2012) "Kim K" (K. Michelle, 2017) Hide your Shea Butter (Crystal Valentine and Aaliyah Jihad, 2016) White Negroes: When Cornrows Were in Vogue ... and Other Thoughts on Cultural Appropriation (Lauren Michele Jackson, 2019) Other Readings: Consuming the Caribbean: From Arawaks to Zombies (Mimi Sheller, 2003) Eating their Words: The Consumption of French Caribbean Literature (Celia Britton, 2014) Slavery and the Culture of Taste (Simon Gikandi, 2014) Black Matters (Toni Morrison, 1992) ZD merch available here and the syllabus for ZD 102 is here! Let us know what you thought of the episode @zorasdaughters on Instagram and @zoras_daughters on Twitter! Transcript will be available on our website here.
01:10:24
June 23, 2021
S1, E19 Keep Nope Alive
Happy Earthstrong to our resident Gemini, Brendane! This week we're bringing you the mental health and self-care episode. We open up with chatting about what we're doing to take care of ourselves. In our What's the Word? segment, we discuss Dr. Arline Geronimus' concept of weathering and how chronic racial stress impacts our physical and mental health. This week, we're reading Dr. Koritha Mitchell’s essay “Identifying White Mediocrity and Know-Your-Place Aggression: A Form of Self-Care” to unpack strategies of self-care that go beyond bubble baths and facials. Mitchell's work helps us understand why we don't need to have the confidence of a mediocre white man, strategies for mitigating know-your-place aggression (spoiler: it's white people holding themselves to the standards they hold others), and why Black capitalism really isn't going to save us. In our What in the World?! segment, we discuss Naomi Osaka saying "Nah" to the French Open, the way Nikole Hannah-Jones' denial of tenure is a form of know-your-place aggression, and finally the co-opting and commodification of self-care. On the latter topic, Alyssa catches the spirit and leaves us with a WORD, hunny! CW: rape culture, child sexual abuse in Hollywood (00:36:30-00:39:00) Liked what you heard? Donate here! Discussed this week: Identifying White Mediocrity and Know-Your-Place Aggression: A Form of Self-Care (Koritha Mitchell, 2018) Reproductive Injustice: Racism, Pregnancy, and Premature Birth (Dána-Ain Davis, 2019) Do The Golden Arches Bend Toward Justice? (Code Switch, NPR, 2021) The Audacity of Nope (Ayesha K. Faines, 2021) ZD merch available here and the syllabus for ZD 102 is here! Let us know what you thought of the episode @zorasdaughters on Instagram and @zoras_daughters on Twitter! Transcript will be available on our website here.
01:13:45
June 9, 2021
S1, E18 Abolition Is Not a Metaphor
Abolition is not about your feelings! It's the long awaited episode where we discuss in detail what it means to be and practice PIC (prison-industrial complex) abolition. In our What's the Word? segment, Brendane and Alyssa unpack Michel Foucault's concept of discipline and docile bodies to think about the way power compels us to regulate our bodies and behaviors. Today, we read Mariame Kaba's new book We Do This 'Til We Free Us: Abolitionist Organizing and Transforming Justice. We pulled out three important themes that we felt help us understand how we got to a place where we can't imagine a world without prisons: punishment vs. consequences, transformative justice vs. restorative justice, and safety vs. security. This leads us into conversations about non-reformist reforms, the difference between crime and harm, accountability, gaslighting of Black sexual assault survivors, and the usefulness of hope. In our What in the World?! segment, we discuss the murder of 16-year-old Ma'Khia Bryant by Ohio police, the ongoing punishment and incarceration of Ashley Diamond, and the cancel culture "crisis" and who really gets cancelled (spoiler: it's not rich celebrities). CW: Throughout the episode we make reference to sexual assault and perpetrators of sexual harm. We describe the medical and juridical process of rape cases from 00:57:00 to 01:01:00. Please take care of yourself as you need while listening. Liked what you heard? Donate here! Discussed this week: We Do This 'til We Free Us: Abolitionist Organizing and Transforming Justice (Mariame Kaba, 2021 Discipline and Punish: The Birth of the Prison (Michel Foucault, 1995) Ma'Khia Bryant (New York Times, 2021) Free Ashley Diamond (GoFundMe) ZD merch available here and the syllabus for ZD 102 is here! Let us know what you thought of the episode @zorasdaughters on Instagram and @zoras_daughters on Twitter! Transcript will be available on our website here.
01:36:45
May 26, 2021
S1, E17 Hot Girl Semester
So you want to go to grad school?! It's the episode you've been waiting for: Brendane and Alyssa talk all things PhD life while incorporating that critical analysis you know and love. In our What's the Word segment, we discuss the four waves of feminism and why people have got intersectionality à la Kimberlé Crenshaw all the way messed up. For What We're Reading, we discuss the essay “Sitting at the Kitchen Table: Fieldnotes from Women of Color in Anthropology” by Tami Navarro, Bianca Williams, and Attiya Ahmad in order to discuss the Self/Other problematic of anthropology that excludes and alienates women of color the discipline, as well as the particular racialized and gendered experiences that make the academy an unwelcoming place. Finally, in What In the World?! we answer your questions and we spill the tea on our application process, our journey to the PhD, shout out the folks that helped us get here, and why you need friends both inside and outside of the Ivory Tower. We also talk the best advice we received about grad school, and self-care where Alyssa shares how her hot girl semester helped her have a healed girl summer. Get ready - it's a long one! And also, apologies for the audio - we're still learning our new mics and audio software! Liked what you heard? Donate here! Discussed this week: Sitting at the Kitchen Table: Fieldnotes from Women of Color in Anthropology (Tami Navarro, Bianca Williams, Attiya Ahmad, 2013) The Anti-Black Pinnings of Ableism (Devyn Springer and Dustin Gibson 2020) Resources for Grad School: Black Girl Does Grad School Hooded: A Black Girl's Guide to the PhD (Malika Grayson, 2020) Back-to-School Beatitudes: 10 Academic Survival Tips (Crunk Feminist Collective, 2011) The Professor Is in: The Essential Guide to Turning Your Ph.D. Into a Job (website) (Karen Kelsky 2015) 57 Ways to Screw Up in Grad School: Perverse Professional Lessons for Graduate Students (Kevin D. Haggerty and Aaron Doyle, 2015) Institute for Recruitment of Teachers Grad school merch available here and the syllabus for ZD 102 is here! Let us know what you thought of the episode @zorasdaughters on Instagram and @zoras_daughters on Twitter! Transcript will be available on our website here.
01:54:06
April 28, 2021
S1, E16 The Empire Claps Back
We did more than write, hunny! In this episode, Alyssa & Brendane explain the what happened between them and Dr. Kiona AKA How Not to Travel Like a Basic Bitch and the "multiracial coalition" on Instagram that led to the baby viral YouTube video. It's a conversation on theory and practice, particularly how theory and experience inform how we perform criticism in our everyday lives and how that lens will make our world better. We also address more of the comments and questions we received on posts and in our DMs. Finally, you'll hear a slightly different version of the conversation than is available on YouTube, as we had to record twice! Liked what you heard? Donate here! Discussed this week: Zora's Daughters' Reaction to How Not To Travel Like a Basic B*tch ZD Merch available here and the syllabus for ZD 102 is here! Let us know what you thought of the episode @zorasdaughters on Instagram and @zoras_daughters on Twitter! Transcript will be available on our website here.
01:37:46
April 14, 2021
S1, E15 B**** Better Have My Money
Mo' money, fewer problems? Today, Brendane & Alyssa take on the question of getting that government guap - reparations, baby! Our new sound is finally here - shout out to our music producer Segnon Tiewul for di big tuuuune! Let us know what you think on Twitter and Instagram. Additionally, the Graduate Workers at Columbia University are currently on strike to push agreement on a fair labor contract with the university, who has threated to dock pay. Donate to the solidarity fund here. *Note* The conference panel Alyssa talks about moderating was postponed due to the strike. An opinion poll released last summer found that 80% of Black Americans believed the federal government should compensate the descendants of enslaved people, compared with 21% of white Americans. In our segment What's the Word? we discuss reparations - what it has meant and what it could mean. In What We're Reading, we talk about Deborah A. Thomas's introduction and coda to her monograph Exceptional Violence: Embodied Citizenship in Transnational Jamaica (2011) to understand what it means to use reparations as a framework for thinking. In our last segment, What in the World?! we have Dr. Thomas on to discuss how her thinking has evolved from reparations to repair, embodiment to affect, and citizenship to sovereignty in her follow up book, Political Life in the Wake of the Plantation: Sovereignty, Witnessing, Repair (2019). We also talk about the questions that animate her research, the announcement of reparations for (some) Black residents in Evanston, Illinois, the 'conjuncture' that's got everyone talking about reparations, and why we should mobilize for reparations and repair on multiple scales. Liked what you heard? Donate here! Discussed this week: Exceptional Violence: Embodied Citizenship in Transnational Jamaica (Deborah A. Thomas, 2011) Political Life in the Wake of the Plantation: Sovereignty, Witnessing, Repair (Deborah A. Thomas, 2019) The Case for Reparations (Ta-Nehisi Coates, 2014) U.S. Museums Hold the Remains of Thousands of Black People (Delande Justinvil and Chip Colwell, 2021) Payback's a B**** (Code Switch, NPR, 2021) ZD Merch available here and the syllabus for ZD 102 is here! Follow us @zorasdaughters on Instagram and @zoras_daughters on Twitter! Transcript will be available on our website here.
01:33:07
March 31, 2021
S1, E14 Afropessimism: Anything but Black!
Stop trying to make Black happen! In this episode, Alyssa & Brendane return to the game Defund Reform Abolish to think discuss and clarify (no pun intended) light skin privilege, the one-drop rule, and white passing. Our What's the (Unclear) Word segment covers the basics of Afropessimism, as well as the difference between economic Afro-pessimism vs Afro-optimism vs. Afrofuturism. In our What We're Reading segment, we discuss the essay "Black Feminist Theory for the Dead and Dying" by Patrice D. Douglass to understand how Black feminist theory and Afropessimism can come together to undo the theorizing of violence against Black women into non-being. Finally, we bring on fellow Daughter of Zora, Chloé Samala Faux, 5th year Anthropology PhD candidate at Columbia University, to help us delve deeper into Afropessmism and its critiques and get to the bottom of 'what is Black?" The conversation gets productive when we debate about whether Meghan Markle is Black, whether it's useful to consider her a non-Black woman of African descent, and the way partus sequitur ventrem (the law of slavery that says "that which is brought forth follows the womb") ultimately does and undoes her. Finally, we remember Breonna Taylor on the one year anniversary of her murder with a moment of silence. It's a long episode and we still didn't get to everything we wanted to talk about! By the time you're listening, Alyssa will be in the thick of her PhD qualifying exams - send good vibes and gifTs (though she loves gifs too)! Liked what you heard? Donate here! Discussed this week: Black Feminist Theory for the Dead and Dying (Patrice D. Douglass, 2018) Afro-Pessimism: The Unclear Word (Jared Sexton, 2016) Brendane's Feature on Savage x Fenty (2021) Prerequisites: Episode 2: Ain't I a Woman Episode 6: Deathcraft Country Episode 11: Not My Latinidad ZD Merch available here and the syllabus for ZD 102 is here! Follow us @zorasdaughters on Instagram and @zoras_daughters on Twitter! Transcript will be available on our website here.
01:55:56
March 17, 2021
S1, E13 The Climate is Anti-Blackness
It's back to our regular programming with just Brendane and Alyssa getting deep into atmospheric anti-blackness, "natural" disasters, and the Texas Deep Freeze. Our What's the Word? is anti-blackness where we explain why the term racism doesn't fully capture the experiences of Black people in the diaspora and how Renaissance and Enlightenment philosophers finessed the category of human. For What We're Reading, we discuss the final chapter of Christina Sharpe's brilliant work In the Wake entitled "The Weather" and get into the importance of Black redaction and annotation in the wake of disaster. In our final segment, What in the World?! (see content warning below), we discuss the 1902 volcanic eruption of Mount Pelée in Martinique, Hurricane Katrina, the Texas Deep Freeze and why white people are so concerned about Ted Cruz leaving Man's best friend behind. We also address the calls for solidarity among increased anti-Asian violence - TL;DR: Bring the fight to the whites. CW: We discuss Black suffering as a result of state neglect (00:33:00). Liked what you heard? Donate here! Discussed this week: In the Wake: On Blackness and Being (Christina Sharpe, 2016) “Call It What It Is: Anti-Blackness” (kihana miraya ross, 2020) Unsettling the Coloniality of Being/Power/Truth/Freedom: Towards the Human, After Man, Its Overrepresentation—An Argument (Sylvia Wynter, 2003) Alyssa on the Just Three Podcast (Center for the Study of Social Difference, 2021) ZD Merch available here and the syllabus for ZD 102 is here! Follow us @zorasdaughters on Instagram and @zoras_daughters on Twitter! Transcript will be available on our website here.
01:01:00
March 3, 2021
S1, E12 On the Shoulders of Our Ancestors
In this episode, Alyssa and Brendane discuss our elders and ancestors of Black feminist anthropology with Associate Professor and President of the Association of Black Anthropologists, Dr. Riché J. Daniel Barnes! Dr. Barnes tells us about how she defines Black feminist anthropology, her journey to and through the discipline, who she thinks of as her unsung Black heroines, and offers advice for the next generation of Black feminist anthropologists. We discuss her book Raising the Race: Black Career Women Redefine Marriage, Motherhood and Community and talk about the importance of care and community in graduate school and academia widely. Liked what you heard? Donate here! Get involved with the Association for Black Anthropologists! Zora Neale Hurston Summer Virtual Institute Visit Dr. Barnes website here or follow her on Twitter. ZD Merch available here and the syllabus for ZD 102 is here! Follow us @zorasdaughters on Instagram and @zoras_daughters on Twitter! Transcript is available on our website here.
01:26:44
February 17, 2021
S1, E11 Not My Latinidad
It's Black History 365 over here! We're back for Part II of the first season of the podcast keeping it "spicy" talking about racialization, DaniLeigh's problematic song "Yellow Bone," and the intersection of Latinidad with anti-blackness. Alyssa and Brendane explain Louis Althusser and interpellation, Frantz Fanon's "Lived Experience of the Black Man," and discuss an article about "Puerto Rican" youth in New Jersey "appropriating" "blackness" to demonstrate "urban competency," and its contribution to the erasure of actual factual Black people. Here's the kicker: it's the first text in the "What We're Reading" segment not written by a Black person. In our final segment, we chat with PhD candidate Daisy E. Guzman, one of the few Garifuna-Guatemalan women in academia, to dig deep into Latinidad, thinking blackness as indigenous, and proclaim that folks are not "white passing" they are white! Liked what you heard? Donate here! Discussed in this episode: The Invention of Race (Throughline Podcast, NPR, 2020) "Becoming American, becoming black? Urban competency, racialized spaces, and the politics of citizenship among Brazilian and Puerto Rican youth in Newark" (Ana Y. Ramos-Zayas, 2007) The Lived Experience of the Black Man (Frantz Fanon, 2008 [1952]) Colorist Clown Culture-Vultures (MayowasWorld, 2021) Transcript is available on our website here. Be sure to check out our Spotify Playlist for ZD 101 curated with our first discussion section group! ZD Merch available here and the syllabus for ZD 102 is here! Follow us @zorasdaughters on Instagram and @zoras_daughters on Twitter!
01:09:00
February 3, 2021
We Black, We Black, and We On the Track!
We're back!  Next week marks the start of ZD 102, the second "semester" of our first season of the podcast! From February to July, we'll be dropping bi-weekly episodes that will continue to challenge and inform. It'll be everything you loved about the first semester, but a little extra because Alyssa and Brendane are where the money reside!  Speak soon!  Shop ZD Swag here!
02:31
January 27, 2021
S1, E10 The Square Root of Impossible is Black Girls
It's our last episode of the ZD Semester! In keeping with the season, Alyssa and Brendane discuss #BlackGirlMagic via the popular Netflix holiday movie Jingle Jangle (SPOILERS)! We discuss the origins of the phrase via CaShawn Thompson and her coinage of the hashtag Black Girls ARE Magic and how it is both celebration of Black women and girls making a way out of no way and critique of a society determined to leave us behind. We read Savannah Shange's incredible essay "Black Girl Ordinary" which teaches us to celebrate the everyday achievements of everyday Black girls. Then, we deep dive into the wonderful world of Journey Jangle - is she really the epitome of the carefree Black girl or is she just another mule for the uplift of a Black man? Listen and find out! Finally, we discuss the problems with Black women having to "save" American democracy - AGAIN. Listen all the way through for a little surprise that will help you in our book giveaway! Discussed in this episode: “Black Girl Ordinary: Flesh, Carcerality, and the Refusal of Ethnography” (Savannah Shange, 2019) Pushout: The Criminalization of Black Girls in Schools (Monique W. Morris, 2016) [Feature length documentary] "Plantation Futures" (Katherine McKittrick, 2013) Jingle Jangle (Netflix, 2020) Liked what you heard? Donate here! Transcript is available on our website here. Be sure to check out the Syllabus for Zora's Daughters 100 - no prerequisites needed! Follow us @zorasdaughters on Instagram and @zoras_daughters on Twitter!
01:08:48
December 9, 2020
S1, E9 Color Struck!
In this episode, Brendane and Alyssa tackle a fraught subject in the Black community: colorism. We discuss the paper bag test, dating "loophole" women for ascendance vs. unambiguously Black women to legitimize one's blackness. In our What We're Reading segment, we bring things full circle with Alice Walker's essay where she coins the term colorism, addresses why talking about colorism in relationships (platonic and romantic) is political, and the way she gathers all y'all faves! In our What in the World?! segment, we discuss interracial relationships IRL and on TV, Blackish Love on OWN, Jessica Krug and the fetishization of light-skinned women and Latinx identity in academia, "racial ambiguity," skin bleaching, and the image "That Little Girl Was Me" that depicted Kamala Harris walking with the shadow of Ruby Bridges. Hold on to your seats, friends, because things get HOT! Liked what you heard? Donate here! Discussed in this episode: Dark Girls (2011) and Dark Girls 2 (2020) Here Comes the Sun (Nicole Dennis-Benn, 2016) Black Love (Oprah Winfrey Network, 2020) Transcript is available on our website here. Be sure to check out the Syllabus for Zora's Daughters 100 - no prerequisites needed! Follow us @zorasdaughters on Instagram and @zoras_daughters on Twitter!
01:24:28
November 25, 2020
S1, E8 The Black Liberal Agenda
It seems we REALLY missed y'all because it's a long episode! Today we talked neoliberalism and waiting for Biden to make it rain with stimmy checks, Black political strategies and women's participation in political movements through the work of anthropologist Leith Mullings, Alyssa explains for 6 whole ass minutes why Canada the "cultural mosaic" isn't the nice post-racial oasis the country's PR team would have you think, why Black capitalism AKA buying Black won't free us, and why Barack Obama is the quintessential Black liberal. We get into Black liberalism and their abolition-ish ways of watering down Black radical politics, what being cancelled really means, and how Black masc & gender non-conforming folks are harmfully impacted by REAL cancel culture. Finally, Brendane tells us more about abolitionist politics, why we weren't begging y'all to vote like most of your other faves, and how Black folks are already practicing abolition. Liked what you heard? Donate here! Discussed this week: Mapping Gender in African-American Political Strategies (Leith Mullings, 1997) Parable of the Sower (Octavia E. Butler, 1993) The Book of Negroes (Lawrence Hill, 2007) (miniseries) Life and Debt (Stephanie Black, 2001) Anita Hill, Clarence Thomas, and Gender Abstractions (Joy James, 1996) Let's Talk About Kamala Harris (NPR Code Switch, 2020) To learn more about abolition in all its forms, check out the website launched by Mariame Kaba: Transform Harm Transcript is available on our website here. Be sure to check out the Syllabus for Zora's Daughters 100 - no prerequisites needed! Follow us @zorasdaughters on Instagram and @zoras_daughters on Twitter!
01:56:57
November 11, 2020
Bonus: The Lost Tapes, Pt. I
Brendane and Alyssa are on Fall Break this week! We'll be back on November 11 with a brand-new episode; in the meantime, listen to our full review of You Belong to Me: Sex, Race, and Murder in the South (2014) and the way the documentary perpetuates the same issue of silencing Black women it purports to solve. CW: sexual abuse, victim blaming, intimate partner violence. If you'd like more of your fix of Zora's Daughters, check us out on Field Initiatives' Field Stories where we discuss being Black women in our research fields and the field of anthropology! Thanks for your support, and if you liked what you heard please donate here! Don't forget to follow us @zorasdaughters on Instagram and @zoras_daughters on Twitter. Speak soon!
12:52
October 28, 2020
S1, E7 Holy is the Black Woman
It's all about God's greatest hits today! Alyssa and Brendane kick off the episode with 'Defund Reform Abolish,' before getting into the colonial and religious history and use of the word diaspora. They debate whether the Jamaican immigrant community is a diaspora and get into some African diaspora religions before moving on to the text of the week: Transcendent Kingdom (2020) by Yaa Gyasi, the story of a PhD student dealing with grief, mental illness, and faith - it definitely elicited some strong feelings! Finally, we reveal who the blockheaded dude Brendane was talking about in the last episode and discuss the high - and problematic - standards women must meet in the church. Stay tuned to the end for another little behind-the-scenes of ZD! Liked what you heard? Donate here! Discussed this week: Transcendent Kingdom (Yaa Gyasi, 2020) The Myth of the Negro Past (Melville J. Herskovits, 1941) European Immigrants in the United States in 2014 (Migration Policy Institute, 2015) Transcript is available on our website here. Be sure to check out the Syllabus for Zora's Daughters 100 - no prerequisites needed! Follow us @zorasdaughters on Instagram and @zoras_daughters on Twitter!
01:34:30
October 14, 2020
S1, E6 Deathcraft Country
In today's episode, Alyssa and Brendane explain why we chose 'Daughters', play a new game called "Defund Reform Abolish," and unpack Achille Mbembe's concept of necropolitics in conversation with Angela Davis' brilliant essay “Racism, Birth Control and Reproductive Rights” who helps us contextualizes the history of birth control movements and eugenics. In our What in the World?! segment, we ask What in the Jordan Peele?! is up with the mass hysterectomies in ICE detention, the erasure of Black immigrants from the immigration outrage, and the neo-Malthusian rhetoric surrounding COVID-19 as a solution to overpopulation and climate change. Plus, we get a little off-topic and start talking about 90 Day Fiance. Discussed this week: Racism, Birth Control and Reproductive Rights (Angela Davis, 1983) Necropolitics (Achille Mbembe, 2003) Whistleblower Alleges 'Medical Neglect,' Questionable Hysterectomies Of ICE Detainees (NPR, 2020) World's richest 1% cause double CO2 emissions of poorest 50% (The Guardian, 2020) Transcript is available on our website here. Be sure to check out the Syllabus for Zora's Daughters 100! Follow us @zorasdaughters on Instagram and @zoras_daughters on Twitter!
01:24:01
September 30, 2020
S1, E5 Lorde Take the Wheel
In today's episode, Brendane and Alyssa are doing the Lorde's work! We talk ideal care packages, the history of the fetish (wassup Freud, Marx, and problematic anthropologists!) and contemporary racial/sexual fetishization, the invisibility and hypervisibility of Black women, honor Audre Lorde's Transformation of Silence into Language and Action, PLUS a ZD first: a guest! In our What in the World?! segment, we discuss the sexual harassment allegations in Harvard's anthropology department and speak with Harvard Anthropology PhD candidate Chrystel Oloukoï about the double-edged sword of institutional whisper networks and how misogynoir excludes Black women from the "safety" of these networks. P.S. Tune in until the end for a little surprise! Liked what you heard? Donate here! Discussed this week: The Transformation of Silence into Language and Action (Audre Lorde, 1978) How Do We Listen to the Living? (Brendane Tynes, 2020) You Belong to Me: Sex, Race and Murder in the South (John Cork, 2014) Summertime Selves (On Professionalization) (Nick Mitchell, 2019) The Patron (Nell Gluckman, 2020) Protected by Decades-Old Power Structures, Three Renowned Harvard Anthropologists Face Allegations of Sexual Harassment (James S. Bikales, 2020) Transcript is available on our website here. Be sure to check out the Syllabus for Zora's Daughters 100! Follow us @zorasdaughters on Instagram and @zoras_daughters on Twitter!
01:31:56
September 16, 2020
S1, E4 The World is Basura en Fuego
The world is a dumpster fire! Today we're talking about what's been helping us get through quarantine, the Anthropocene and the hypocrisy of its hyper-ethics, Black feminist futurity and imagination and environmental racism and the slow violence of redlining, superfund sites, and the water in Flint, MI. We also discuss the value of taking up arms versus taking up community care during and after the revolution, as well as the ethics, politics, and erotics of sharing videos of Black death. Liked what you heard? Donate here! Discussed this week: Blackness and the Pitfalls of Anthropocene Ethics (Axelle Karera, 2019) Staying With the Trouble: Making Kin in the Chthulucene (Donna J. Haraway, 2016) How Decades of Racist Housing Policy Left Neighborhoods Sweltering (The New York Times, Brad Plumer and Nadja Popovich, 2020) In the Wake: On Blackness and Being (Christina Sharpe, 2016) Transcript is available on our website here. Be sure to check out the Syllabus for Zora's Daughters 100. Follow us @zorasdaughters on Instagram and @zoras_daughters on Twitter!
01:27:34
September 2, 2020
S1, E3 There's Some Anthros in this House
Today we're answering the question What makes this anthropology?, discussing the politics of respectability and its iterations for African-Americans vs. Jamaican immigrants, we celebrate Black women’s bodies and Jamaican dancehall with Carolyn Cooper's essay "Lady Saw Cuts Loose: Female Fertility Rituals in the Dancehall", and we bring it to popular culture with Cardi B and Megan Thee Stallion's new banger WAP and Kamala Harris' historic nomination as the Democratic candidate for VP to think about the tax Black women must pay when they're in positions of power. Discussed this week: "The Emergence of Modern Blackness in Jamaica" (Deborah Thomas, 2007) "Lady Saw Cuts Loose: Female Fertility Rituals in the Dancehall" (Carolyn Cooper, 2004) "You Want Me To Watch The Kids While You Go Out With Another Guy?" (Where Should We Begin? with Esther Perel, 2020) "Bullshit Jobs: A Theory" (David Graeber, 2018) "Dude, You're a Fag": Masculinity and Sexuality in High School (C.J. Pascoe, 2011) Transcript will be available on our website: https://bit.ly/ZDTranscript3 Be sure to check out the Zora's Daughters 100 syllabus for the First Semester of the podcast: http://zorasdaughters.com/zoras-daughters-100/ Follow us @zorasdaughters on Instagram and @zoras_daughters on Twitter!
01:44:28
August 19, 2020
S1, E2 Ain't I a Woman?
In this episode, we're talking about archetypes of Black women - the Mammy, the Jezebel, the Sapphire - and the ways they continue to be used against Black women, we fangirl over Hortense Spillers, and Alyssa struggles with pronunciation (#DecolonizeLanguage!). We dig into the repercussions of the Moynihan report, ungendering, and Tory Lanez's alleged assault of Megan Thee Stallion. This episode ends with our commitment to #ProtectALLBlackWomen and uplifting the names of recently murdered Black transwomen Alejandra Monocuco, Tiffany Harris / Dior H Ova, and Queasha Hardy. Content Warning: This episode discusses U.S. slavery, rape and rape culture, and intimate partner violence. If you would like to skip over the latter section, it's from 1:02:00 - 1:24:35. Discussed this week: Reparations for Aunt Jemima! (Still Processing, 2020) Ain’t I a Woman? (Sojourner Truth, 1851) Mama’s Baby, Papa’s Maybe: An American Grammar Book (Hortense Spillers, 1987) Sapphire as Praxis: Toward a Methodology of Anger (Bettina Judd, 2019) Thank you everyone for your support of our GoFundMe! We are fully funded and have hired two Black women transcriptionists. We are incredibly heartened!  Justice for Alejandra: https://www.change.org/p/superintendencia-de-salud-colombia-justice-for-alejandra Justice for Queasha: https://www.change.org/p/baton-rouge-police-department-justice-for-queasha-hardy Transcript is available NOW on our brand NEW website: bit.ly/ZDTranscript2 Be sure to check out the Zora's Daughters 100 syllabus for the First Semester of the podcast: http://zorasdaughters.com/zoras-daughters-100/ Follow us @zorasdaughters on Instagram and @zoras_daughters on Twitter!
01:26:14
August 5, 2020
S1, E1 What in the Misogynoir?!
It's OUR FIRST FULL EPISODE! We're talking about misogynoir: our experiences, transmisogynoir, the erasure of Zora Neale Hurston and her rediscovery thanks to Alice Walker, Essence Magazine drama, how gatekeeping benefits Black men, Brendane's viral Twitter thread, and we ask WHY, Academia? WHY?! Discussed this week: On misogynoir: citation, erasure, and plagiarism (Moya Bailey and Trudy, 2018) Looking for Zora (Alice Walker, 1975) A Society of One: Zora Neale Hurston, American Contrarian (The New Yorker, Claudia Roth Pierpoint, 1997) Thick: And Other Essays (Tressie McMillan Cottom, 2019) (Support Black-owned: The Lit. Bar) Follow us @zorasdaughters on Instagram and @zoras_daughters on Twitter! Transcript available at http://bit.ly/ZDTranscript1
01:22:02
July 22, 2020
The World Simultaneously Is and Is Not Ready For Us
An introduction to Zora's Daughters: a biweekly podcast where Alyssa and Brendane take a close look at some of the things we encounter in our everyday lives with the  goal of spreading love and affirmation, and demonstrating how thinking like a Black feminist anthropologist can contribute to understanding and changing the world around us. Follow us on Twitter @Zoras_Daughters and on Instagram @ZorasDaughters. Transcript available here: bitly.com/ZDTranscript0
02:37
July 15, 2020