Baby Your Baby

Baby Your Baby

By KUTV 2News
Welcome to the KUTV 2News Baby Your Baby podcast. Here we talk about pregnancy, having a baby, and all things parenting.

Sponsored by the Utah Department of Health and Intermountain Healthcare.
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When your unborn baby is not expected to live
Receiving news of an impending pregnancy loss is devastating. You may experience a variety of emotions and have a lot of questions about what may happen and what to do next. That’s why the Angel Watch program was started more than 20 years ago. Jade Elliott sat down with Amelia Hopkin, a licensed clinical social worker with Intermountain Healthcare, to explain  how the Angel Watch program can help you if you learn that your unborn baby is not expected to live on this episode of the Baby Your Baby Podcast. How Angel Watch got started The Angel Watch program was started by two women who saw a need to help support women faced with impending pregnancy loss. In 2000, Intermountain Healthcare took interest and purchased it with the agreement to keep it free of charge and make it available to anyone –not just Intermountain patients – and that outreach would be done in homes. The program has grown beyond the Salt Lake area and is also offered in Utah County, Ogden, St. George and Logan. Angel Watch is staffed by specially trained social workers and chaplains Master’s level social workers, nurses, bereavement specialists and chaplains are available on-call to provide home visits when pregnant women receive a diagnosis of impending pregnancy loss. How do women connect with Angel Watch? The Angel Watch caregivers receive referrals from doctors, maternal fetal medicine specialist offices, genetic counselors and others familiar with the program, who let them know when a pregnant mom has received news her unborn baby has a life-limiting diagnosis and is interested in these services. These special caregivers work with moms during the transition time when babies are still in utero. Angel Watch offers in-home services and referrals Angel Watch services are done primarily in the form of home visits, phone calls, education and providing written materials and referrals to community resources. Ongoing support provided for two years We do support for two years following the loss. We can refer to other resources or other families who’ve experienced this at the beginning of the process or later down the road. There is a high risk for perinatal mood and anxiety disorders during and after these experiences. Our goal is to help reduce the trauma associated with this experience. Outcomes can be better for all involved if they get proper support. Parents can learn to model handling loss, so their children can learn how to handle the loss of their potential sibling. For more information about Angel Watch, click here. You can also call 801-698-4486 or email angelwatch@imail.org. The Baby Your Baby program provides many resources for all pregnant women and new moms in Utah. There is also expert advice from the Utah Department of Health and Intermountain Healthcare that air each week on KUTV 2News.
41:15
March 6, 2020
Specialized classes to help moms and families prepare for a new baby
For moms that want more specific education classes related to childbirth, Intermountain Hospitals offer a variety of classes by location. Jade Elliott  talks specifics about those classes with Kathy Credille, RN, MSN, with the Intermountain Healthcare Learning Network on this episode of the Baby Your Baby Podcast. Some of the specialized classes related to childbirth offered at Intermountain Healthcare hospitals include: Low-intervention childbirth A basic overview on non-medicated approach. Provides techniques and tools to manage labor and birth process. Requires deeper commitment from partner or coach. Hypnobirthing A form of self-hypnosis or meditations that helps you manage contractions. It’s a deeper intervention and requires a deeper commitment from the partner. It’s more focused than a traditional childbirth class. Breastfeeding Essentials This class is taught by a lactation specialist or registered nurse and goes deeper into breastfeeding details and addresses challenges. Participants practice with a doll to learn proper positioning. Tips and tricks are taught for making breastfeeding easier. Common breastfeeding problems are addressed such as latching on, nipple problems, clogged milk ducts, mastitis, etc. Breastfeeding is natural for some women and it’s challenging for some. Success depends not only on the mom, but also on the baby and their abilities. If a baby is born even as little as 3-5 weeks early, they can have challenges. This class gives you a chance to learn from the pros, i.e. other women who have been through this before and have become experts. It’s usually held on one evening. You can take this class while still pregnant. Other related classes: Pre-Natal Exercise – varies by location. Sibling Class –A new baby is a change for the whole family. How to interact with the baby. Held on one evening. Postpartum Care Support Group – a regular chance for mew moms to connect and share experiences and offer encouragement. Baby Care Class - goes deeper than the online classes. How to care for your newborn and what things to watch for. Baby safety – Covers growth and development. Recognizing illness in your baby or other concerns. How to sign up for childbirth education classes Go to https://intermountainhealthcare.org/ and then your local hospital webpage and click on the classes and events tab. Do a keyword search for birth. To listen to our podcast about introducing babies to pets, click here. To listen to our podcast about general childbirth education classes, click here. The Baby Your Baby program provides many resources for all pregnant women and new moms in Utah. There is also expert advice from the Utah Department of Health and Intermountain Healthcare that air each week on KUTV 2News.
13:04
February 28, 2020
WIC Program
WIC supports lower income families with over four decades of proven success by improving health outcomes for women, infants and children. WIC is a supplemental nutrition program designed to help pregnant women, new mothers, and children under the age of 5 eat well and stay healthy. Jade Elliott sat down with JoDell Geilmann-Parke, WIC Outreach Coordinator for Salt Lake County Health Department, on this episode of the Baby Your Baby Podcast to discuss the program and upcoming changes. Foods that meet high nutrition standards can be purchased with WIC grocery vouchers at a variety of participating stores. These foods vary depending on an individual’s nutrition needs but may include infant formula and cereal, a large selection of fruits and vegetables, eggs, milk, cheese, peanut butter and whole grains. In addition to food vouchers, WIC provides nutrition education and extensive breastfeeding support to participating families. WIC strives to reduce health disparities in the community by encouraging healthy eating habits, providing access to healthy foods, and promoting breastfeeding as the optimal source of nutrition for infants. WIC services are currently reaching less than 40% of eligible individuals in Utah. The big news for 2020 is that Utah WIC is converting from paper vouchers to smart cards and will be available throughout the state at all county health departments by the end of the year. E-WIC will streamline the shopping and checkout process and make using WIC easier for participants. WIC has also modernized their website to include a client portal and created a WIC Shopper APP to make WIC services more accessible. There are income eligibility requirements to participate in WIC. You can visit https://wic.utah.gov/ to check eligibility and find out how to apply or call 1-877-WICKIDS. The Baby Your Baby program provides many resources for all pregnant women and new moms in Utah. There is also expert advice from the Utah Department of Health and Intermountain Healthcare that air
12:51
February 21, 2020
Keeping your child healthy at daycare
Sooner or later your baby or child will be exposed to germs and may end up getting sick. If your baby goes to daycare or to other places they may interact with many children such as a church nursery, play group or public play areas, they may get sick at a younger age, but that does help them build immunity. Some children may not be exposed to a lot of germs until they start attending pre-school or school. Either way, your child will eventually be exposed to some common illnesses. Jade Elliott sat down with  Dr. Shellie Ring, a pediatrician with Intermountain Healthcare to talk about common contagious illnesses your baby might be exposed to at daycare or other public settings. Some of the most contagious diseases among babies and young children: RSV Respiratory syncytial virus. Common contagious virus that infects the respiratory tract among children under age two. Symptoms are similar to a cold, but if it progresses it can affect breathing and become serious. Pink Eye The official name for pink eye is conjunctivitis which is when the membrane that lines your eyelid becomes inflamed. Symptoms in the eye are redness, itchiness, grittiness, discharge that forms a crust during the night and make it difficult for your baby to open their eye in the morning. Stomach viruses and diarrhea Viral gastroenteritis is very common and very contagious. Your baby can get it from sharing a cup or utensils with someone who has the virus or coming into contact with infected fecal matter, and then put their hand in their mouth, which can happen a lot in daycare settings. Symptoms include diarrhea, vomiting, fever, abdominal pain, chills, achiness. It’s important to keep them home from daycare if they have these symptoms. Hand Foot Mouth Disease Symptoms include fever, sore throat, runny nose, and then a blister-like rash on the hands, feet or in the mouth. Children are contagious during the first week and remain contagious until the rash has disappeared. How to help prevent your child from getting sick The younger your baby is the more you’ll want to avoid public areas during cold and flu season and avoid being around people that are sick. Importance of proper hand washing and using sanitizer for young children and caregivers before eating and after diaper changing, using the bathroom, touching pets, being in public spaces or if anyone has symptoms. Changing tables and potty chairs, should be sanitized after each use at daycare. Toys and other items frequently touched like bathroom fixtures, drinking fountains, doorknobs or handles should be sanitized daily. Click here for more information about viruses and where in Utah they are active. The Baby Your Baby program provides many resources for all pregnant women and new moms in Utah. There is also expert advice from the Utah Department of Health and Intermountain Healthcare that air each week on KUTV 2News.
18:11
February 14, 2020
Dads and alcohol
It's not something that is often talked about, but alcohol use can impact dads and dads-to-be. Jade Elliot sat down with Marcela Smid, MD, maternal-fetal medicine, University of Utah Health, on this episode of the Baby Your Baby Podcast to discuss the negative effects of heavy alcohol use in dads. For healthy men under the age of 65: more than 4 drinks per day or more than 14 drinks per week may indicate risky drinking. Alcohol and other drug use has a familial component, and 40-60% of alcohol use disorder are attributed to genetic/familial components. Alcohol use among fathers-to-be may decrease fertility among couples with infertility. Among couples experiencing fertility issues, alcohol use may decrease sperm count and motility. Heavy alcohol use is associated with decreased paternal attachment to infants and increased maternal depressions. Any substance use disorders increases the risk of substance use disorder in children. For more information on infertility, click here or listen to our Baby Your Baby podcast on the topic. Click here to listen to the Baby Your Baby Podcast on alcohol use before and during pregnancy. For information on mental health and substance use disorder treatment services, click here. The Baby Your Baby program provides many resources for all pregnant women and new moms in Utah. There is also expert advice from the Utah Department of Health and Intermountain Healthcare that air each week on KUTV 2News.
19:50
February 7, 2020
Miscarriages
Going through miscarriages can be very difficult. It’s important to understand that a miscarriage is not your fault. Miscarriage can't be prevented and are usually due to a developmental problem or a chromosomal abnormality. 10–25 percent of pregnancies end in miscarriage, and one to five percent of women experience two or more pregnancy losses that don’t progress to term. Less than 1 percent of miscarriages are called stillbirths because they happen after 20 weeks gestation. Jade Elliott talks with Ware Branch, MD, Ware Branch, MD, a maternal-fetal medicine physician with University of Utah Health and Intermountain Healthcare, on this episode of the Baby Your Baby Podcast to discuss miscarriage. What are the symptoms of a miscarriage? Bleeding and spotting are the most common signs of miscarriage. Cramping can also happen. These symptoms don’t always mean you are miscarrying. It is important to talk with your doctor if you are experiencing any of these signs. Women may also see large clots or tissue discharge from their vagina. What causes miscarriage? Genetic abnormalities is one of the common causes of a miscarriage. As many as 50–70 percent of all early pregnancy loss occurs because the embryo has too much or too little genetic material. Pre-existing medical conditions may also play a role. Those conditions include immune system issues, thyroid/hormonal issues, Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS) and RH factor. Lifestyle, like alcohol and drug use may also play a role as well as the age of the mother. Can a miscarriage be prevented? A miscarriage cannot be prevented, but there are some things you can do to increase your chance of a healthy and successful pregnancy. Take a prenatal vitamin. Exercise regularly Avoid smoking and using alcohol or recreational drugs. Attend regular prenatal appointments. Eat a healthy diet. Talk to your doctor if you’ve had a miscarriage in the past, or if you have any concerns. For more information on miscarriages, click here. To learn how to cope with miscarriage, click here. To listen to the Baby Your Baby Podcast on infertility, click here. The Baby Your Baby program provides many resources for all pregnant women and new moms in Utah. There is also expert advice from the Utah Department of Health and Intermountain Healthcare that air each week on KUTV 2News.
30:24
January 31, 2020
Period tracker apps
There are a lot of reasons for women to track their menstrual cycle. In the last few years a lot of period tracker smart phone apps have been developed. There’s even one in the health app standardly included on the iPhone. Jade Elliott sat down with certified nurse midwife, Emily Hart Hayes from Intermountain Healthcare,  to talk about reasons to track your menstrual cycle and whether the apps are reliable at predicting fertility or helping you get pregnant or avoid pregnancy on this episode of the Baby Your Baby Podcast. Why it’s a good idea for women to keep track their period When you see a provider, they often ask for the date your last menstrual period started. “In healthcare, asking when you last had a period is like taking a fifth vital sign. If you haven’t had a period in a while or they’ve been irregular, it may indicate pregnancy, perimenopause or menopause or be a signal to check for thyroid problems, polycystic ovaries, or other conditions,” says Hayes. Apps can help you predict your period, but are they accurate? “Tracking your period and entering that information into an app can be helpful at predicting your periods, especially if you’ve got pretty regular cycles that happen about once a month. If your menstrual cycles are irregular, it can be harder to predict,” says Hayes. The more data you input, the better the app becomes at predicting your cycle. “An app can tell you your cycle is 30 days instead of the average of 28 days. The app may help you recognize that ovulation is not always on day 14 for example,” she adds. Knowing when your period is likely to occur is helpful for planning and to help you manage your life activities: for example, if you know when you might have a pre-menstrual headache or irritability or when cramps may be at their worst you can make adjustments. There are many period apps – check the privacy terms Some period tracker apps include: Eve, Ovia, Period Calendar, Period Diary, My Calendar, Flo Period, and even the My Health app that comes standard on iPhones allows you to input your menstrual cycle info. Most apps are essentially the same. Read and understand the privacy terms you’re agreeing too. You may or may not want to input your sexual activity information. For the contraception podcast mentioned during this podcast, click here. The Baby Your Baby program provides many resources for all pregnant women and new moms in Utah. There is also expert advice from the Utah Department of Health and Intermountain Healthcare that air each week on KUTV 2News.
14:35
January 24, 2020
Childbirth education classes
When you find out you’re pregnant for the first time, there are so many things to think about like finding out the gender, choosing baby equipment and decorating the nursery. But don’t forget about the most important event – the birth. Many women are nervous about labor. One of the best ways to help calm those fears is to take a childbirth education class to help you prepare and know what to expect during labor and learn about some of the different childbirth options available. Jade Elliott sat down with Kathy Credille, RN, MSN, with the Intermountain Healthcare Learning Network on this episode of the Baby Your Baby Podcast to discuss the childbirth classes and options  available for busy moms-to-be. Why childbirth education is so important Becoming a parent is such a transitional time, there are so many changes and there’s so much to learn. Our bodies are made to give birth. Knowing how to navigate that and work with your body is empowering. Childbirth education classes help decrease fear and increase knowledge. They also help prepare you to care for your newborn, which can be overwhelming. Childbirth education classes can help you understand the changes your body makes while pregnant and informs you about the labor and birth process. More knowledge about the birth process can help you make decisions as they arise. Every labor is different Learning about the labor and birth process helps you understand not only the common path that labor typically takes, but also the variations in the labor process and how to prepare to be flexible when your labor doesn’t go as planned. It can be helpful to make a labor plan, but you need to keep your mind open and be flexible. You can’t control everything. The classes also address the mental health aspects of this role transition time and be aware of peripartum depression and mood disorders. The classes also explains the process of your body returning to a non-pregnant state so that you have realistic expectations for that. Childbirth education classes help especially if you’re hoping for a non-medicated childbirth or low-intervention childbirth If you want to learn how to manage the pain and contractions of labor without medication, the classes are especially helpful. But even if you’re opting for an epidural, they help you understand and prepare for the labor process. The Baby Your Baby program provides many resources for all pregnant women and new moms in Utah. There is also expert advice from the Utah Department of Health and Intermountain Healthcare that air each week on KUTV 2News.
12:53
January 17, 2020
Screen time for babies and toddlers
Screens and media are everywhere and can be a powerful tool for your child’s learning and play. However, nothing can replace face-to-face interaction and play with your child. Jade Elliott sat down with Kaitlin Carpenter, MD, a pediatrician with Intermountain Healthcare, on this episode of the Baby Your Baby Podcast to discuss screen time guidelines for your kids. The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) has issued several recommendations regarding screen time for children: • Under 18 months: Avoid screen time other than video-chat. • 18-24 months: Limit screen time to high-quality programming. • Over 2 years old: Limit screen time to 1 hour per day of high-quality programming created for young children, like Sesame Street and other PBS shows such as Daniel Tiger. Make sure you are watching and discussing shows with your child. They can be great ways for you and your child to learn together. The most powerful thing parents can do is be a “media mentor” and show children how to appropriately interact with phones, tablets, and TVs. • Co-watch shows and videos or co-play games with kids. • Try to avoid constant use of your phone around your child. You are your child’s best role model. They will do what you do, so if you are constantly on your phone, your child will be too. • Designate times and places that are phone- or screen-free, like dinner time or bedtime. • Like anything else in a child’s life, children do well with consistent limits. Encourage playtime up and away from screens after the limits are up. It can be tempting to use media as an emotional pacifier (think crying toddler at the doctor’s office). While that is a nice solution that can be used sometimes, try not to make it a habit. Kids need to learn their own coping strategies (like a hug from mom or dad) or another way to channel those emotions. Here are some additional ideas and AAP resources for families: • When considering whether to get paper books or eBooks, choose paper books. Research has shown that children learn better and interact more with paper books. • There seems to be a relationship between increased media use in young children and obesity, research has shown. • Consider making a Media Use Plan with your family. Visit HealthyChildren.org/MediaUsePlan for tips. • Learn about age-appropriate apps and game reviews at Commonsensemedia.org. The Baby Your Baby program provides many resources for all pregnant women and new moms in Utah. There is also expert advice from the Utah Department of Health and Intermountain Healthcare that air each week on KUTV 2News.
13:12
January 10, 2020
Infertility
Infertility affects about 15% of couples. Infertility is considered the failure to become pregnant within one year of unprotected intercourse for women under the age of 35 and within six months of trying for women over 35. Jade Elliott sat down with Megan Link, MD, reproductive endocrinology and infertility specialist, University of Utah Health, on this episode of the Baby Your Baby Podcast to discuss the causes of infertility and the options for couples who are struggling to become pregnant. Is infertility just a woman’s problem? No, men can have infertility issues as well. In fact, male factor is the cause of infertility in 40-50% of couples. What causes infertility in women? Failure to ovulate Ovulating irregularly Fallopian tube problems Uterine problems Endometriosis Older age What causes infertility in men? Sperm problems: low sperm count, no sperm present in semen Prior vasectomy Cystic Fibrosis Sexual dysfunction: erectile dysfunction, ejaculatory dysfunction How long should couples try to get pregnant before seeing a doctor? Women under 35: 1 year Women over 35: 6 months Women 40 and older: more immediate evaluation is recommended If you are concerned in general; however, get evaluated sooner. You don’t have to wait a full year if you have a history of irregular periods, for example.  When should someone consider IVF? Male factor Tubal factor Other treatment options have failed Other options: Older age of the female partner: can use donor eggs Parents are carriers for genetic disease that could be transmitted to the child (Cystic Fibrosis, muscular dystrophy). IVF can be utilized to create embryos and then test the embryos to see if they are affected by the disease in question. Gestational surrogacy: Women has a medical condition that makes carrying a child dangerous to her health, or has a condition that makes it impossible for her to carry a pregnancy. In many of these cases, we can create embryos using her own eggs and then transfer one embryo into another women’s uterus. Oncofertility: Preserve eggs or embryos prior to receiving cancer treatment that is harmful to the ovaries. Elective fertility preservation: because fertility declines with age in women, an increasing number of women are choosing to freeze eggs until they are ready to start a family. Approximately 1 in every 100 babies born in the U.S. was conceived through IVF. For more information on IVF, click here. To learn more about infertility and your options, click here. The Baby Your Baby program provides many resources for all pregnant women and new moms in Utah. There is also expert advice from the Utah Department of Health and Intermountain Healthcare that air each week on KUTV 2News.
23:41
January 3, 2020
Adverse Childhood Experiences
Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) is the term used to describe all types of abuse, neglect, and other potentially traumatic experiences that occur to people under the age of 18. ACEs are unfortunately quite common; two out of three people have at least one emotional injury during childhood, meaning this essentially effects every family. Jade Elliott sits down with Dr. William Cosgrove, pediatrician and chair of Salt Lake County Board of Health, to discuss Adverse Childhood Experiences and how they can negatively impact someone throughout their life. ACEs have been linked to risky health behaviors, chronic health conditions, lower life potential, and early death.  As the number of adverse experiences increase, so does the risk for those outcomes. Positive experiences or protective factors can prevent children from experiencing adversity and can protect against many of the negative health and life outcomes even after adversity has occurred. It is important to address the conditions that put children and families at risk of ACEs so that we can prevent ACEs before they happen. Strengthen economic supports to families, including family-friendly work policies Support positive parenting, including reducing corporal punishment Provide quality care and education early in life Enhance parenting skills to promote healthy child development, including early childhood home visitation Intervene to lessen harms and prevent future risks To listen to our podcast about the importance of parental and infant mental health, click here. The Baby Your Baby program provides many resources for all pregnant women and new moms in Utah. There is also expert advice from the Utah Department of Health and Intermountain Healthcare that air each week on KUTV 2News.
20:25
December 27, 2019
Most pregnancies are normal
When women are thinking about getting pregnant or first find out they’re pregnant, all kinds of thoughts, questions and worries might run through their heads. Even though they might have friends, sisters or mothers who’ve had children, this is the first time they’re really thinking about themselves and what to expect and what might happen to their body, their baby and how their life might change. Jade Elliott sits down with certified nurse midwife, Emily Hart Hayes from Intermountain Healthcare, on this episode of the Baby Your Baby Podcast, to help allay some of those common fears that pregnant women have. The statistics show that 96 to 97 percent of the time, babies are born normal and healthy “Birth defects only occur in about 3 percent of births according to the U.S. National Institute of Health,” says Hayes. The US Healthy People 2020 initiative estimates that about 85 percent of pregnant women enter labor at “low risk” for problems. While complications can arise in pregnancy and birth, they are not the norm. It’s common for women to worry about their health and their baby’s health during pregnancy “Pregnancy is a normal, natural condition, but it can also be an uncomfortable condition. Women’s worries during pregnancy are often centered around whether what they are feeling is normal. Common worries include concerns about miscarriage, birth defects and preterm labor,” says Hayes. Keep exercising – it’s good for you One of the most effective ways you can help your pregnancy stay health and normal is to eat a healthy diet and get regular exercise. It’s best to start pregnancy at a healthy weight. Continuing to exercise will help you stay health and not gain too much weight. Hayes recommends women avoid exercise that would increase the chance of a blow to the abdomen or a fall, such as contact sports, skiing, or horseback riding. During exercise, your heart rate should be such that you can you carry on a conversation. Listen to your body. Is it too much? If it doesn’t cause pain or exhaustion then it’s ok. If you’ve been a regular runner then you can continue, but you may find you need to adjust your routine as your pregnancy progresses. You may be more prone to injury. During pregnancy, your balance changes. Cycling could be an issue. You may want to look more to low impact exercise such as swimming. Don’t start a rigorous new sport or exercise program when you’re pregnant, but starting a low-impact program such as daily walks is not only ok, but it’s encouraged. Be careful with your diet and weight gain during pregnancy Gaining some weight during pregnancy is normal, but gaining too much or too little can increase risks of developing complications in pregnancy. To learn about the weight gain guidelines, click here. For more information and resources, click here. The Baby Your Baby program provides many resources for all pregnant women and new moms in Utah. There is also expert advice from the Utah Department of Health and Intermountain Healthcare that air each week on KUTV 2News.
25:34
December 20, 2019
Introducing babies to pets
Bringing your new baby home is an exciting and stressful time for the whole family, including your family pet. Whether it is a dog, cat, bird, fish, or any other animal, there will be changes for you and for them when a new baby comes home. Jade Elliott sits down with Kaitlin Carpenter, MD, a pediatrician with Intermountain Healthcare, to discuss the best ways to introduce your baby to a family pet on this episode of the Baby Your Baby Podcast. Some studies have shown that children with pets in their home at an early age have less risk of developing asthma by age 7. Another study showed that children with dogs or cats in their home in the first year of life had fewer and less severe respiratory infections.  While the precise cause is unclear, these positive outcomes could be a result of good exposures and possibly because the children are building a health microbiome with help from a pet. There are some easy things new parents can do to ease the transition for babies and pets: Before the baby comes home, prepare your animal. Mess with their food while they are eating. Gently pull on ears and tails. Some parents will even play loud crying noises. Consider getting your stroller out so that the animal can get used to it. Give your animal their own space. Find a good place outside. If possible, block off the area with the pet’s food bowl so that it doesn’t become a temptation for babies. Place cat litter boxes well out of reach Make sure aquariums are high enough that little hands can’t reach them to pull them over. First introductions are important • Even the best animal may not react normally. Always watch your animal around your baby. Cats often like to sit on babies. Dogs like to lick babies’ faces. • Just like siblings need extra attention when a new baby comes home, it’s also important to give your pets some extra attention when possible. Include them on walks with the stroller. A few extra belly rubs can go a long way. The Baby Your Baby program provides many resources for all pregnant women and new moms in Utah. There is also expert advice from the Utah Department of Health and Intermountain Healthcare that air each week on KUTV 2News.
09:45
December 13, 2019
Parental and infant mental health
It's important to make sure parents and babies are happy and healthy. New parents are sometimes diagnosed with depression or anxiety. An infant's mental health can impact their overall development. Jade Elliott sits down with Heather Kunz, social worker, Salt Lake County Health Department, on this episode of the Baby Your Baby Podcast to talk about parental and infant mental health. Maternal Mental Health Depression Approximately 15% of women experience significant depression following childbirth. 10% of women experience depression during pregnancy.  A woman might experience feelings of: Anger Sadness Irritability Guilt Lack of interest in the baby Changes in eating and sleeping habits Trouble concentrating Thoughts of hopelessness To listen to the Baby Your Baby Podcast on how new and expecting moms can manage their mental health by using the acronym SNOWBALL, click here. To listen to the Baby Your Baby Podcast on postpartum depression and dads, click here. Anxiety Approximately 6% of pregnant women and 10% of postpartum women develop anxiety. This could include: Constant worry. Feeling that something bad is going to happen. Racing thoughts Disturbance of sleep and appetite Inability to sit still Physical symptoms like, dizziness, hot flashes, and nausea To listen to the Baby Your Baby Podcast on postpartum anxiety and OCD, click here. Infant Mental Health Infant mental health is reflected in appropriate cognitive, social, emotional, and physical development.   Good mental health for children under 5 includes: Secure attachments Positive relationships Confidence Curiosity Effective communication Increasing self-regulation Social competence Self-awareness Expressions of love and happiness To listen to the Baby Your Baby Podcast on the program, Parents as Teachers, which provides parents with child development knowledge and parenting support, click here. The Baby Your Baby program provides many resources for all pregnant women and new moms in Utah. There is also expert advice from the Utah Department of Health and Intermountain Healthcare that air each week on KUTV 2News.
17:03
December 6, 2019
Is a midwife right for you?
When you find out you’re pregnant you are faced with many choices. One of those choices is whether to have a physician or midwife care for you during your pregnancy and birth. Depending on where you live, you might think that only physicians care for women in pregnancy but, midwives are a safe choice for most women. Jade Elliott sits down with certified nurse midwife, Emily Hart Hayes from Intermountain Healthcare , on this episode of the Baby Your Baby Podcast to discuss the philosophy of midwifery, what to look for and when you are considering who to care for you and your baby during pregnancy and birth. In the U.S., certified nurse midwives and certified midwives attend 8 percent of births and the rate is about 12 percent if you look at just vaginal births. In Utah, midwives attend about 10 percent of births. The advantages of seeing a midwife Typically, midwives allow more time during prenatal visits and can also provide additional support during labor and birth. Midwives provide the same prenatal screening tests physicians do, including lab tests, ultrasounds, blood pressure checks, and monitoring for complications. Midwives generally have the philosophy to use interventions judiciously. For example, they may not break your bag of waters to speed up the birth process as long as labor is progressing normally. Midwives offer continuous labor support and that has been shown to decrease the chance of Caesarean section. Midwives will typically intervene as needed. They can prescribe medications and use medications to induce labor. They care for women who are laboring with or without epidural anesthesia for pain relief, and they may recommend a c-section be performed. Midwives generally don’t do a routine episiotomy or order a routine hydration IV, although an IV may routinely be placed for emergencies. They allow moms to eat and drink during normal labor if they desire. Midwives provide general women’s care and can manage some complications during pregnancy Midwives may care for you if you have health problem that arises before or during your pregnancy, whether independently or jointly with an OB/Gyn or maternal fetal medicine specialist. They care for women with gestational diabetes and pregnancy induced high blood pressure, depending on the setting, and they can attend births for women who have had a previous Cesarean birth. There are even midwives who work collaboratively with physicians who jointly care for women with high risk chronic conditions such as Type 1 diabetes, high blood pressure, or autoimmune diseases. Midwives aren’t just for pregnancy and birth. You can also see a midwife for general women’s primary care and gynecological issues such as pap smears, annual exams, birth control and family planning, immunizations including the HPV vaccine, and breast exams. Midwives care for women throughout the lifespan, from puberty to menopause and beyond. And yes, there are some male midwives. To learn more about midwives or to find one in your area, click here. The Baby Your Baby program provides many resources for all pregnant women and new moms in Utah. There is also expert advice from the Utah Department of Health and Intermountain Healthcare that air each week on KUTV 2News.
24:38
November 29, 2019
Kids and epilepsy
November is National Epilepsy Awareness Month. Epilepsy is prevalent worldwide. Jade Elliott sits down with Margo Thurman, Executive Director, Epilepsy Foundation of Utah, on this episode of the Baby Your Baby Podcast to discuss epilepsy, when it begins and some of the causes. In the U. S., 3.4 million have epilepsy. In Utah, approximately 30,000. Worldwide there are 65 million people living with epilepsy.  33 1/3 % of those with autism have epilepsy and 1 in every 5 of those with TBI have epilepsy. There are approximately 470,000 children under 17 years of age in the U.S. have active epilepsy. What is epilepsy? Epilepsy is the most common brain disorder – with no age, racial, social class, national or geographic boundaries. Any one of us can get epilepsy. Epilepsy is complex and there are many different types of epilepsy. Seizures are a symptom of epilepsy. When does epilepsy begin for most people? Epilepsy can begin at any age. About 50 % of cases begin in infancy, childhood and adolescence What are some causes of epilepsy? Causes before age 1 can include: a newborn illness; abnormal brain development; a genetic disorder; encephalitis (infection of brain) meningitis (infection of membranes covering the brain) febrile illness related seizures (febrile seizures) What are febrile seizures? Children 3 months to 6 years may have seizures with a high fever, these are called febrile seizures. This is more likely to happen to children with a family history of febrile seizures. Febrile Seizures occur in 2% to 5% of all children – (2 to 5 out of 100 children) Among children who have their first seizure before their 1st birthday, 50 % will have at least one more. What can parents do if their child has a febrile seizure? If child has frequent febrile seizures, talk to your health care team about the best approach to prevent/treat seizures. Can febrile seizures be cured? Children have best chance of becoming seizure free if they have early intervention with a specialist trained in epilepsy and seizures. What is the basic thing to remember when a seizure happens? If your child has a febrile seizure, administer seizure first aid --- Stay, Safe, Side Stay with your child and start timing seizure Keep your child Safe by moving them away from harmful objects Turn them on their side and place something small and soft under their head If seizures last longer than 5 minutes call 911 or take them to the emergency room If your child is walking around, carefully follow them To contact the Epilepsy Foundation of Utah, call 801-455-6089 or email utah@efa.org The Baby Your Baby program provides many resources for all pregnant women and new moms in Utah. There is also expert advice from the Utah Department of Health and Intermountain Healthcare that air each week on KUTV 2News.
13:24
November 22, 2019
Traveling with babies and toddlers
Traveling with babies can be both fun and stressful. Jade Elliott sat down with Kaitlin Carpenter, MD, a pediatrician with Intermountain Healthcare, on this episode of the Baby Your Baby Podcast to discuss some helpful tips to make the travel process more manageable. Car rides • Make sure that infants are always in a rear-facing car seat. Get a mirror on the back window or seat so that you can see your baby. Keep the environment comfortable and be prepared to sing silly songs for several hours. • Do not feed your baby in a moving car. Schedule feeding breaks for babies when they are very young. • For babies that are getting more mobile (think toddlers), it is important to have “wiggle breaks” every few hours. It can be great to find some place every 2-3 hours that has a park for them to get out and run. • Toys and snacks are vital. Don’t think you will get to listen to your podcast, you're more likely to listen to Mahna Mahna by the Muppets for 45 minutes straight, but if the baby is happy,  it is worth it. Plane rides • Make sure your infant or toddler has something to chew on during takeoff and landing to help pop ears. If you are breastfeeding, breastfeed during takeoff and landing (if the baby is awake). Often infants will fall asleep because the white noise and vibration are soothing, so don’t wake them up to feed them during landing. For toddlers I like to bring fruit snacks because they make them chew and taste good without making a huge mess. • Eliminate limits to screen time on an airplane. Have a tablet ready and watch away. Have your child practice using headphones before your trip. • Bring an empty water bottle to fill up before the flight for a toddler. • Kids ages 1-2 years are often the biggest challenge. If you can afford to get them a seat, please do. Try to set limits for the important things (kicking the chair in front of them), but let them have some leeway if possible (playing peekaboo with people around them). • Everyone has been that parent who stands and paces for an entire flight with a screaming toddler. Remember: It is always worse for you than it is for everyone else. Take a deep breath. The flight will eventually end. The Baby Your Baby program provides many resources for all pregnant women and new moms in Utah. There is also expert advice from the Utah Department of Health and Intermountain Healthcare that air each week on KUTV 2News.
13:41
November 15, 2019
Dads and postpartum depression
Having a baby is a major life change and a big adjustment, not just for moms, but for dads too. Being a postpartum parent puts you at slightly higher risk of depression. We hear a lot about postpartum depression in moms, but dads can have it too. Jade Elliott sat down with Anna McMillan, LCSW, Intermountain Healthcare, to discuss the signs and symptoms of postpartum depression in dads on this episode of the Baby Your Baby Podcast. 10.4% of new fathers experience depression compared to 4.8% of the general male population. If a mother has postpartum depression, it may increase the likelihood the father will have postpartum depression. In the 12 months following a child’s birth, it’s estimated rates of depression range from 24 to 50 percent for fathers whose spouses experience maternal postpartum depression. Symptoms of postpartum depression in men: They may not cry but may feel: Frustrated Irritable Detached Angry Impulsive May be more likely to: Engage in substance use or domestic violence Feel excluded from mother-baby bonding Discourage their partner from breastfeeding Risk factors that can contribute to depression in new or soon-to-be fathers include: Personal or family history of depression Unemployment or feeling overwhelmed with expectations of your role as provider or father Missing attention and/or sex from your partner Feeling excluded from the bond between mom and baby Lack of sleep after the baby is born Stressful birthing experience, baby with special needs Conflict between how you feel you should be as a man and how you are Lack of social or emotional support Where can you go for help if you need urgent mental health treatment for PPD or other behavioral health issues? Intermountain LDS Hospital in Salt Lake, McKay Dee Hospital in Ogden and Dixie Regional Medical Center in St. George offer walk in behavioral health access centers that are open 24 hours. Behavioral Health Access Centers provide psychiatric and crisis care for individuals 18 years and older. Click here for locations. You can also call the CrisisLine at (801) 587-3000. Other resources for about dads and postpartum depression include: http://postpartumdads.org/ http://postpartum.org/services/dads/signs-of-ppd-anxiety-in-men/ The Baby Your Baby program provides many resources for all pregnant women and new moms in Utah. There is also expert advice from the Utah Department of Health and Intermountain Healthcare that air each week on KUTV 2News.
15:00
November 8, 2019
Parents as Teachers program
A home-visiting program called Parents as Teachers is available for most families. The program  provides parents with child development knowledge and parenting support, so they can provide early detection of developmental delays and health issues, prevent child abuse and neglect, and increase their children's school readiness. On this week's episode of the Baby Your Baby Podcast, Mandi Peck, a health educator with the Salt Lake County Health Department, explains how this program works and why it's a useful tool for parents. PAT gives parents individualized, one-to-one support specific to their child(ren)’s needs and concerns. There are three areas (domains) we focus on in our home visits: development-centered parenting, parent-child interactions, and overall family well-being. Some of the things we suggest and work on during a visit includes: reading to the child, using play as education and as a monitor for development, and establishing good daily routines. We also host monthly group connections so participating PAT families can network, get peer support, and learn from each other. Any family can participate in this program. For more information about Parents as Teachers in Utah, click here. To see if you are eligible for the program specifically through the Salt Lake County Health Department, click here. Parents as Teachers is a nationwide program. To learn about more about it, click here. The Baby Your Baby program provides many resources for all pregnant women and new moms in Utah. There is also expert advice from the Utah Department of Health and Intermountain Healthcare that air each week on KUTV 2News.
19:18
November 1, 2019
Flu season and the influenza vaccination
Flu season is nearly here, so it's time to get your flu shot. Jade Elliott sat down with Dr. Per Gesteland, a pediatric hospitalist from the University of Utah School of Medicine and Intermountain Primary Children’s Hospital, on this episode of the Baby Your Baby Podcast to discuss the importance of the vaccine and why you and your family should get it every year. Influenza vaccine is available. Get your flu shot now – or at least by the end of October. Influenza vaccination is an essential component of prenatal care. Pregnant women who are worried or confused about vaccination can get information form the American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology website, and should talk to their doctor. Influenza vaccination is recommended for most everyone over age six months. Children aged six months through eight years who require two doses should receive their first dose as soon as possible to allow the second dose by the end of October. Insurance should cover the influenza vaccine and it is easy to get at your local pharmacy, doctor’s office or local health department, and at many workplaces. Influenza is the most common cause of death in children and adults of all the vaccine preventable illnesses in the U.S. Influenza vaccine is safe and effective and prevents thousands of deaths and hospitalizations each year. The influenza vaccine teaches your immune system to be more efficient at fighting the virus. Feeling symptoms of a sore arm, muscles, low grade fever or fatigue is not an allergy to the vaccine, those are just some symptoms people can feel when their immune system is learning how to fight an infection. While you still may feel symptoms of influenza if you are exposed to the virus, the vaccine is designed to help keep you out of the hospital or dying from the infection. In an average year 3 to 11 percent of people nationwide are infected with the influenza virus and have symptoms from it. More are infected when you count those who do not have symptoms. Rates can also be higher in severe influenza seasons like we had two years ago. GermWatch.org is a great tool for parents. GermWatch.org is a tool developed by the University of Utah and Intermountain Healthcare. It gives general information about: Trending illnesses in Utah and their symptoms Suggestions to help alleviate symptoms and when to be seen by a doctor Prevention recommendations. To learn more about flu season, click here. The Baby Your Baby program provides many resources for all pregnant women and new moms in Utah. There is also expert advice from the Utah Department of Health and Intermountain Healthcare that air each week on KUTV 2News.
15:02
October 25, 2019
Croup
Croup is now here in Utah. Most cases of croup are mild, but it can be very serious for infants. Jade Elliott sits down with Dr. Per Gesteland, a pediatric hospitalist from the University of Utah School of Medicine and Intermountain Primary Children’s Hospital, on this episode of the Baby Your Baby Podcast to talk about symptoms and when you should take your child to the doctor. Parainfluenza Type 1 is Causing Croup in Kids Typically appears in the fall of odd numbered years and we are starting to see cases. What are the symptoms of croup? A "barking" cough, may be worse at night Raspy voice Labored, noisy breathing Fever is possible Rash Eye redness Swollen lymph nodes Most cases of croup are mild and can be treated at home. oTry to keep your child calm, as crying can make croup worse. oMay treat fever with acetaminophen or ibuprofen. oSoothe cough by breathing moist air. Use a cool-mist humidifier or run a hot shower to fill a bathroom with steam. Or, breathe cool outdoor air by going outside or driving with the car windows slightly lowered. oDrink plenty of fluids. oSee a doctor when symptoms are more severe. Premature babies or children with asthma are more at risk for complications. Click here for the GermWatch page that's tracking  Parainfluenza Type 1. The Baby Your Baby program provides many resources for all pregnant women and new moms in Utah. There is also expert advice from the Utah Department of Health and Intermountain Healthcare that air each week on KUTV 2News.
13:36
October 18, 2019
Birth spacing
Birth spacing refers to the time between one child’s birth and the conception of the next pregnancy. On this episode of the Baby Your Baby Podcast, Jade Elliott sat down with Aimee Nussbaum, Maternal Child Health Director, March of Dimes Utah Market, to discuss why women should wait at least 18 months between pregnancies. What is birth spacing? Birth spacing refers to the time between one child’s birth and the conception of the next pregnancy. This is also known as the interpregnancy interval. Approximately 33% of all birth in the United States have short interpregnancy intervals (
13:33
October 11, 2019
Contraception
If you would like to prevent pregnancy, there are many different types of birth control options available to you. Depending on your health and needs, you can find a method that will work for you. There are three main types of reversible birth control. Talk to your health care provider to determine which method is best for you. Jade Elliott sat down with Nickee Palacios, Health Promotion Coordinator, Maternal and Infant Health Program, to discuss the different options for contraception. Long-Acting Reversible Contraception (LARCs) Intrauterine Device (IUD): a T-shaped piece of plastic that is put into the uterus and prevents sperm from fertilizing an egg. IUDs are over 99% effective and can last between 3 and 12 years, depending on which type you get. You can get either a hormonal IUD or a non-hormonal IUD, which is made of plastic and a small amount of natural, safe copper. The implant (Nexplanon) is a small rod that is inserted under the skin of your upper arm and releases hormones. It is over 99% effective and prevents pregnancy for up to 4 years. Hormonal Methods Birth control pills, patch, ring, and shot All four of these methods work by releasing hormones that keep your ovaries from releasing eggs and makes it harder for sperm to reach an egg. These methods, with typical use, are 91% effective. Barrier Methods Condoms and Diaphragm These two methods work by creating a barrier so sperm and and egg cannot meet. Neither of these methods contains hormones and are about 82% effective for the typical user. Condoms also prevent the spread of Sexually Transmitted Disease. A new Utah law allows pharmacies to dispense 3 types of birth control; the pill, patch or ring, through a standing order signed by Dr. Miner, Executive Director of the Utah Department of Health. Women, eighteen years and older, can get their pills, patch, or contraceptive ring directly from the pharmacist any participating pharmacy, such as an Associated Food Store, a Costco, or a Smith’s. Women can come directly to a participating pharmacy to ask about contraceptives or birth control. A pharmacist will do a health screening of her medical and health history. The health screening is nothing to worry about, It is just a list of questions to help the pharmacist understand her health history. She will be asked questions like “Do you have diabetes?” and “Do you smoke?” To find a list of participating pharmacies, click here, or call 801-273-2871. The Baby Your Baby program provides many resources for all pregnant women and new moms in Utah. There is also expert advice from the Utah Department of Health and Intermountain Healthcare that air each week on KUTV 2News.
07:41
October 4, 2019
Preventing pre-term births
Pre-term births  can happen to any expectant mother. Doctors says right now, they do not know all of the causes of pre-term birth, but there are some risk factors that can increase the chance of one. Jade Elliott sat down with Sean Esplin, MD, Maternal Fetal Medicine Specialist, Intermountain Healthcare, to discuss pre-term birth, the causes and how technology is helping doctors learn more about it. Common causes or risk factors that increase the chance of pre-term birth: Infection is most common. There are different types of infections and it depends on how the body responds to that infection. Smoking or substance abuse during pregnancy Short time between pregnancies Expecting multiples, twins, triplets, etc. This is becoming more common. Identical twins who share a placenta are especially risky. 50 percent of twins come early. Abnormal vaginal bleeding Abnormal shape of the uterus or a cervix that is short or weak. Maternal and fetal stress What kinds of symptoms of preterm labor should a woman call her doctor about? Call your obstetrician or other health care professional right away if you notice any of these signs or symptoms: Change in type of vaginal discharge (watery, mucus, or bloody) Increase in amount of discharge Pelvic or lower abdominal pressure Constant low, dull backache Mild abdominal cramps, with or without diarrhea Regular or frequent contractions or uterine tightening, often painless Ruptured membranes (your water breaks with a gush or a trickle of fluid) For more information on symptoms and risk factors, click here. Why is it so difficult to prevent pre-term birth? Of every 100 women, 10 percent will deliver pre-term. Doctors don't  know which 10 percent. When they have a heads up it’s easier to prevent. There’s a 30-40 percent recurrence rate if a woman has previously had a pre-term birth. In most cases doctors have no prior knowledge that a woman will have pre-term labor or deliver prematurely. Sometimes they can do surgery to stitch the cervix together if it’s opened prematurely. At 20 weeks gestation, it’s standard practice to look at the cervix in an ultrasound. Sometimes doctors insert a pessary device that helps holds the cervix closed. Sometimes doctors do everything we can, but we can’t stop the labor. This is the Instagram account mentioned on this episode, @imamom2be. The Baby Your Baby program provides many resources for all pregnant women and new moms in Utah. There is also expert advice from the Utah Department of Health and Intermountain Healthcare that air each week on KUTV 2News.
16:48
September 27, 2019
Childproofing your home
Cooler weather is coming and kids will be playing indoors more often. Whether you have young children who visit or you’re bringing home a new baby, fall is a good time to reduce the risk of injury inside your house. It’s also good to make sure your safety efforts and devices are up to standard and in good working condition. Jade Elliott sits down with Jessica Strong, Community Outreach Manager, Primary Children’s Hospital, on this episode of the Baby Your Baby Podcast. Together, they discuss how to make your home safe for kids. Falls are a leading cause of injury at home. Don’t leave babies alone on beds, changing tables, or sofas. Secure furniture to the wall using mounts, brackets, anchors, or wall straps to prevent tip-overs. Keep a locked gate at the top and bottom of stairs. Replace older safety gates that are large enough to entrap a child’s head and neck. Always strap children into highchairs, swings, bouncers, and strollers. Keep windows closed and locked Cribs Use an infant sleep sack instead of loose blankets to keep baby warm. Remove pillows and all other loose items (blankets, toys) from an infant’s sleep area to reduce the risk of suffocation. No older cribs w/drop sides Heating elements Cover all radiators and baseboard heaters with childproof screens. Keep electrical space heaters at least 3 feet from beds, curtains, or anything flammable. Unplug and store all hot appliances, such as curling irons, out of reach. When cooking, turn pan handles toward the back of the stove. Poisoning Store medicines and products in their original containers. Lock medicines and household products where children cannot see them or reach them. Call medicine by its proper name, not “candy”. Use a carbon monoxide alarm to help prevent poisoning. Keep the Poison Control Center’s number handy, such as a fridge magnet or programmed into your phone, 1-800-222-1222. Other safety measures Learn CPR and first aid. Use Anti-Scald Devices for faucets and shower heads and set your water heater temperature to 120 degrees Fahrenheit to help prevent burns. Use corner bumpers on furniture and fireplaces to help prevent injuries from falls against sharp edges. Cordless window coverings are recommended to help prevent strangulation.  If your blinds were installed in 2000 or earlier and you cannot afford cordless window coverings, visit the Window Covering Safety Council. To see Jade and Jessica walk through a home and demonstrate what they are talking about on the podcast, click here. For more information and keeping your child safe, click here. The Baby Your Baby program provides many resources for all pregnant women and new moms in Utah. There is also expert advice from the Utah Department of Health and Intermountain Healthcare that air each week on KUTV 2News.
11:48
September 20, 2019
Gestational diabetes
Gestational diabetes is a type of diabetes that happens during pregnancy. Like other kinds of diabetes, gestational diabetes affects how the body processes glucose or sugar, causing glucose levels to be higher than they should be. Jade Elliott sits down with Emily Hart Hayes, a Certified Nurse Midwife with Intermountain Healthcare, on this episode of the Baby Your Baby Podcast. Together they discuss how to prevent gestational diabetes and how to manage it. How common is gestational diabetes? According to the Centers for Disease Control, between 2 and 10 percent of pregnancies are affected by gestational diabetes. Why does it happen during pregnancy? Pregnancy hormones can make it harder for insulin to move glucose from your blood into other cells in your body. How can diet and exercise help you prevent or manage gestational diabetes? We know gestational diabetes is caused by the body's inability to process glucose normally. Maintaining a healthy weight, eating a balanced diet low in sugar, and getting regular exercise all help the body keep blood sugar under control. Exercise is especially important because it helps the body be more sensitive to insulin (the hormone that allows cells to use blood sugar for energy). Is gestational diabetes routinely tested for during pregnancy? When and how? Yes, most women will be tested for gestational diabetes. Typically, we test for this between 24- 28 weeks gestation (at the end of the 2nd trimester or beginning of the 3rd trimester). This usually involves drinking a sugary drink with a set amount of glucose in it, then measuring the blood glucose level an hour later to see how the body is able to process that sugar. For women who have risk factors, they may be tested early in pregnancy during the 1st trimester. What are the warning signs for gestational diabetes? Most people with gestational diabetes don’t have any symptoms, which is why it’s so important to test for this during routine pregnancy care. What are the risk factors? Being overweight or obese, Family history of type 2 diabetes, Have previously given birth to a baby who weighed more than nine pounds Have had gestational diabetes in a previous pregnancy Women who are African American, Hispanic/Latino, American Indian, Alaska Native, Native Hawaiian, or Pacific Islander Women considering pregnancy can help start the pregnancy out as healthy as possible by eating healthy and exercising to help reduce the chances of developing this disease and give their baby the best possible start in life. For women who have a body mass index in the obese or overweight category, they may reduce their risk of diabetes by losing weight prior to pregnancy. For more information on gestational diabetes, click here. The Baby Your Baby program provides many resources for all pregnant women and new moms in Utah. There is also expert advice from the Utah Department of Health and Intermountain Healthcare that air each week on KUTV 2News.
12:53
September 13, 2019
High-risk pregnancies
Some women have risk factors before pregnancy or events that happen during pregnancy that make their pregnancy high-risk. Jade Elliott sits down with Dr. Sean Esplin, a Maternal Fetal Medicine Specialist with Intermountain Healthcare, on this episode of the Baby Your Baby Podcast. Together they discuss high-risk pregnancies and what to do if you are at high risk. When is a pregnancy considered high risk? A pregnancy with complications that could affect the health of the mother, the baby or both would make a pregnancy high risk. What risk factors might women have before becoming pregnant that might make them high risk of having complications? 1. Age of the mother (under 17 or over 35) 2. Pre-existing medical conditions such as: High blood pressure Being overweight or obese Chronic disease like diabetes or autoimmune diseases Heart, lung or kidney problems Chronic infections like HIV or STDs History of miscarriage Family history of genetic disorders Talk to a doctor before becoming pregnant if you have one of those conditions. What can you do before and during pregnancy to help your pregnancy be low risk? Take folic acid supplements or pre-natal vitamins before and during pregnancy Stay up to date on immunizations Eat a healthy diet and maintain proper weight Get regular physical exercise, unless advised by your doctor Avoid cigarettes, alcohol and drugs, except medications approved by your doctor Go to your pre-natal check-ups What kinds of things might happen during pregnancy that would make it high risk? Expecting multiples (twins, triplets, etc.) Gestational diabetes Pre-eclampsia – characterized by high blood pressure, protein in urine. Swelling may occur. Premature labor Placenta previa – when the placenta partially or totally covers the cervix or opening of the uterus. Fetal development problems What are some signs or symptoms during pregnancy that you should call your doctor about? Vaginal bleeding or leaking fluid from the vagina Sudden or severe swelling of face, hands or fingers Pain or cramping in the lower abdomen Fever or chills Pain or burning with urination Severe or long-lasting headaches Vision problems Persistent vomiting, nausea, dizziness Baby is moving less than normal after 28 weeks. Fewer than 10 movements within two hours Have thoughts of harming yourself or your baby For more information on high-risk pregnancies and maternal fetal medicine, click here. The Baby Your Baby program provides many resources for all pregnant women and new moms in Utah. There is also expert advice from the Utah Department of Health and Intermountain Healthcare that air each week on KUTV 2News.
18:20
September 6, 2019
Meet Jade Elliott, the new host of the Baby Your Baby Podcast
KUTV's Jade Elliott is the new host of the Baby Your Baby Podcast.  Jade joined 2News after spending most of her news career in eastern Washington from Spokane to most recently back in her hometown, the Tri-Cities, where she was the main morning news anchor for KAPP/KVEW-TV. Jade is a wife and mom and, when not reading the news, she loves to sing, emcee events, wakeboard and watch football with her family. Married to a proud former Utah Ute football player, you can find them both at the stadium during the season. Jade loves getting up dark and early to bring you the latest news from overnight and throughout the morning. You can catch her during the week on 2News in the morning.
02:03
September 4, 2019
Developmental milestones
It's exiting for parents to watch their baby grow and learn. During the first year, new parents will see a lot of changes in their baby from learning to smile to crawling. Holly Menino sits down with Jackie Swan, the early Intervention Program Director at Summit County Health Department, on this episode of the Baby Your Baby Podcast.. Together, they discuss the developmental milestones a baby will experience during the first year. Question: What does a baby do at 2 months? Answer: Begins to smile, learns to self-calm, coos, turns toward sounds, pays attention to faces, begins to follow things with his eyes, can hold head up and begins pushing up on tummy, makes coordinated movements with arms and legs. Question: As the baby starts to grow, what can you expect at 4 months? Answer: Smiling spontaneously, likes to play with people, copies some movements and facial expressions like smiling/frowning, begins to babble, babbles with expression and copies sounds he hears, cries in different ways to show hunger, pain or being tired, lets you know if happy or sad, responds to affection, reaches for a toy with one hand, uses eyes and hands together, follows moving things from side to side, watches faces closely, recognizes familiar people, holds head steady, pushes down on legs when feet are on a surface, may be able to roll over from tummy to back, can hold a toy and shake it, bring hands to mouth, on tummy pushes up onto elbows. Question: Of course, the major milestone for 6 months is sitting independently. What other skills happen at 6 months? Answer: Knows familiar faces, likes to play with others especially parents, responds to other people’s emotions, likes to look at self in mirror, responds to sounds by making sounds, babbling with vowel sounds and takes turns with parent while making sounds, responds to own name, makes sounds to show joy and displeasure, begins to say consonant sounds, looks around at things nearby, brings things to mouth, shows curiosity about things, transfer toys hand to hand, rolls over in both directions, sits with no support, in standing supports weight on legs.  Question: What are the milestones at 9 months? Answer: May be afraid of strangers, clingy to familiar adults, has favorite toys, understands the meaning of “no”, makes a lot of different sounds mamamamama and babababa, copies sounds and gestures of others, uses index finger for pointing, understands when you hide an object, plays peek a boo, puts things in mouth, moves things smoothly from hand to hand, pincer grasp, gives toys to you on request, stands holding onto surface, gets into sitting position, crawls, sits and reaches for toys, pulls to stand. To see the toys Jackie and Holly are talking about during the podcast, click here. To learn more about toys that help babies learn and develop, click here.   The Baby Your Baby program provides many resources for all pregnant women and new moms in Utah. There is also expert advice from the Utah Department of Health and Intermountain Healthcare that air each week on KUTV 2News. 
14:42
August 30, 2019
Alcohol use before and during pregnancy
Alcohol use is a common question for newly pregnant women or breastfeeding moms. Even though most people know to avoid alcohol in pregnancy, many people don’t know the details about alcohol use in pregnancy and breastfeeding. Holly Menino sits down with Al Romeo, RN, PhD;  a registered nurse w with the Utah Department of Health’s MotherToBaby/Pregnancy Risk Line program. Together they discuss the risks of alcohol use and drinking while breastfeeding.   Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASDs) are caused by alcohol use during pregnancy and are 100% preventable. Estimates are that FASD affects up to 5 in 100 newborns. In Utah, 3% of women report drinking alcohol in last 3 months of pregnancy, affecting approximately 1,500 births each year. There is no known safe level of alcohol use. Daily alcohol use and binge drinking increase the risk of FASD. Some of the risks of alcohol use include miscarriage, birth defects (facial features such as a smooth philtrum (space between upper lip and nose) and thin upper lip; heart defects; skeletal defects (growth deficiencies)), developmental delays (attention deficits; learning disabilities; poor judgment (difficulty understanding right and wrong)).  FASD is difficult to diagnose, especially when the person does not have symptoms and the mother’s alcohol use in pregnancy is unknown. There is no cure and life-long treatment, interventions, and supports are needed to address related symptoms such as inappropriate behaviors.  Moms sometimes have questions about drinking alcohol while breastfeeding. For every serving of alcohol (12 ounces of beer, 4 ounce of wine, 1.5 ounces of hard liquor), women should wait 2 to 2.5 hours before breastfeeding. So, for 1 serving, the usual 3 hours between breastfeeding should be fine. For 2 servings, mom should wait 5 hours before breastfeeding again. If moms have concerns or questions about a particular situation, she can contact MotherToBaby Utah. They will provide her with more information. Their phone number is 801-328-2229 and website is MotherToBaby.utah.gov. For more information on FASDs, click here. The Baby Your Baby program provides many resources for all pregnant women and new moms in Utah. There is also expert advice from the Utah Department of Health and Intermountain Healthcare that air each week on KUTV 2News.
13:11
August 23, 2019
Down syndrome
Down syndrome is the most common chromosomal disorder. About 1 in 800 babies are born with it. Holly Menino sits down with Dr. Jennifer Goldman-Luthy, an assistant professor of pediatrics at the University of Utah and works in the University Pediatric Clinic and the University Hospital Nursery, on this episode of the Baby Your Baby Podcast. Together, they discuss Down syndrome, how it is diagnosed and how it impacts a newborn baby.   What are the symptoms of Down syndrome?  Facial features can include epicanthal folds (the way the eyelids cover the inner corner of the eye) and upslanting eyes, sometimes with white spots in the colored part of the eye (Brushfield spots); low set, small ears; flatter nose and flatter face; small mouth or tongue that sticks out. The body can have: short neck with extra skin at the back of the neck, a single palmar crease, wide hands with shorter fingers, short stature, a deep groove between the first and second toes. Mild to severe intellectual disability (most are mild to moderate). Low muscle tone which can make it harder to roll over, sit up, and walk as early as other kids, and can make it hard to swallow safely. Increased risk for: congenital heart defects, problems with development of the intestines or not swallowing safely, reflux, constipation, respiratory/breathing problems including sleep apnea, impaired hearing, vision problems like cataracts, celiac disease, Alzheimer's disease, childhood leukemia or other blood disorders, thyroid conditions, problems with the stability of the upper spine, shorter attention span and impulsivity, delayed speech, repetitive mannerisms (tics), autism, and behavioral problems.  How is it diagnosed? During pregnancy: Routine pregnancy screening could detect about 90% of babies with Down syndrome. Not all choose to get the screening done. To learn about screenings and genetic testing listing to this episode of the Baby Your Baby Podcast. So only about 50% of babies with Down syndrome are detected before delivery. How can I learn more about Down syndrome? Medical Home Portal website National Down Syndrome Congress website National Down Syndrome Society website To learn about Baby Gwen and her parents' journey after learning Gwen had down syndrome, click here. The Baby Your Baby program provides many resources for all pregnant women and new moms in Utah. There is also expert advice from the Utah Department of Health and Intermountain Healthcare that air each week on KUTV 2News.
16:52
August 16, 2019
Recognizing and preventing child abuse
Child abuse is something we don’t talk much about, but we need to talk about in order to stop it. Holly Menino sits down with Dr. Corey Rood, a child abuse pediatrician at the University of Utah School of Medicine and Primary Children’s Hospital, on this episode of the Baby Your Baby Podcast. Together they discuss how to recognize child abuse and what to do if you suspect it.  1 in 5 kids will be sexually abused nation wide before they turn 18. Last year, there were 10,600 substantiated victims of child abuse in Utah. In 2017, 1,720 kids died nationwide due to child abuse. The number of children who die of child abuse is about the same number of kids who die of cancer in a year. Cancer isn’t fully curable or preventable yet, but child abuse is.  If you see something, say something! Utah adults by law are obligated to report suspected child abuse.  Abuse is any action that causes or threatens harm.  Forms of abuse can include: Physical  Neglect  Emotional  Sexual If you see or suspect child abuse: Report it. It’s your responsibility. To report child abuse: Call the Child Abuse/Neglect Hotline 1-855-323-DCFS (3237) Call Law Enforcement  Reporting is anonymous and safe. You don’t have to confront someone you suspect is harming a child. For more information on preventing and reporting child abuse, click here. The Baby Your Baby program provides many resources for all pregnant women and new moms in Utah. There is also expert advice from the Utah Department of Health and Intermountain Healthcare that air each week on KUTV 2News.
15:28
August 9, 2019
Potty Training
When your child is between the age of 18 months and 3-years-old, it's time to start thinking about potty training. The best time to start is when your child starts to show an interest in the potty. Holly Menino sits down with Jackie Swan, the early Intervention Program Director at Summit County Health Department on this episode of the Baby Your Baby Podcast.  Together they discuss when to know if your child is ready for potty training and the best ways to teach them.  Question: What are signs that children are ready for potty training? Answer: Around 18 months, children develop control over their bowel and bladder. Some kids are ready at 18 months and some at age 3. Your child is ready when they stay dry for at least two hours at a time, recognize that they are urinating or having a bowel movement, develops physical skills that are critical for potty training including walking, pulling down pants, getting onto potty, coping parents toiling behavior, follows simple instructions, wants to wear big boy pants, doesn’t like to be in soiled diaper and asks to be changed. Question: What are some pre-training tips? Answer: Take trips to the bathroom to practice the routine, even when the child is still wearing diapers, change the diaper in the bathroom. Question: What are signs not to start potty training? Answer: When your child is going through significant changes in their life, it might be a good time to wait. Examples include: moving, change of child care arrangements, switching crib to bed, new baby, illness, death in family or crisis. If it’s a stressful time and you see more accidents, this is normal. Take a break and come back when things have settled down.  Question: What should I avoid when potty training? Answer: Be matter of fact and without lots of emotion, toilet training can have lots of power struggles because the toddler wants control. Don’t force your toddler to use the toilet, avoid power struggles, don’t talk about potty training or doing anything about it for a while until your child shows signs of readiness and interest again.  Once Upon a Potty and Everyone Poops are two recommended books to read with your child. The Baby Your Baby program provides many resources for all pregnant women and new moms in Utah. There is also expert advice from the Utah Department of Health and Intermountain Healthcare that air each week on KUTV 2News.
11:47
August 2, 2019
Post-maternity leave
If you are returning to work after having a baby, you will need to start planning weeks ahead of time. Sometimes, you even need to start while you're still pregnant. Holly Menino sat down with nurse Dani Kurtz from Intermountain Moms on this episode of the Baby Your Baby Podcast. Together, they discuss how to prepare yourself and your baby for going back to work.  Daycare: who you’re going to leave your baby with is probably one of the most stressful aspects of going back to work. Search during early pregnancy for daycare. Factors to consider when choosing a daycare. Once you’ve picked a daycare, get to know them. Downside: illness. It’s bound to happen. Pro: socialization Separation Anxiety: parents have more of it than babies. At the young age of 2-3 months when mothers typically go back to work, a baby doesn’t understand object permanence You can give your baby smaller and shorter doses of separation at home before having to do it the first time. While on maternity leave look for opportunities to leave your baby with a trusted caregiver for short amounts of time-go on a date, run some errands by yourself. That dreaded moment when you leave your crying baby in someone else’s arms is rough—but rest assured that you’ll probably cry more than your child. Breastfeeding/Pumping: how does it all work when going back to work? It is definitely possible to continue nursing a baby after going back to work! The key is maintaining milk supply by pumping about as often as your baby eats while you’re gone. Nurse in the morning before leaving for work and plan the rest of your day’s pumping schedule off of that first feeding. Talk with your boss about a safe and comfortable place to pump while you’re at work. To be most efficient, purchase or rent an electric double breast pump Be prepared with videos of your baby cooing and crying  Plan ahead Pack bags and plan outfits the night before. Do whatever you can to make the morning easier. If possible, make plans with your boss to work from home part time. Make time for you. This is much easier said than done, but think of yourself as a cell phone with limited battery power. If you don’t get charged, you’ll be just like your phone and shut down. At that point, you’re no good to yourself or anyone else! For more information click here.  The Baby Your Baby program provides many resources for all pregnant women and new moms in Utah. There is also expert advice from the Utah Department of Health and Intermountain Healthcare that air each week on KUTV 2News. 
18:36
July 26, 2019
How partners can help during labor, delivery and postpartum
When your partner is getting ready to give birth for the first time, Dads or significant others may not know what to expect or how to be involved or even wonder how much their being involved makes a difference. Studies prove that when fathers or partners are involved before, during and after a baby’s birth there are numerous benefits to the mom and the baby. Holly Menino sat down with Hollie Wharton, DNP, CNM, WHNP, a midwife and nurse practitioner at Intermountain Alta View Women’s Clinic on this episode of the Baby Your Baby Podcast. Together, they discuss the important role of partners during and after childbirth.  Benefits of Father/Partner Involvement Mother more likely to have early, regular prenatal care Parents more likely to attend pre/postnatal classes Mother more likely to breastfeed, continue breastfeeding Maternal smoking and alcohol abuse rates reduced Reduced anxiety  Less perceived pain  Greater satisfaction with the birth experience  Lower rates of postnatal depression  Lower rates of premature birth and infant mortality  Father more likely to take an active role  Father feels empowered rather than helpless A childbirth preparation class can help prepare you and your partner for labor and delivery Intermountain Healthcare hospitals offer one-day options on Saturdays or one evening a week for a few weeks. They can help you know what to expect during labor and what to expect at the hospital and how to prepare. To find Intermountain childbirth classes, call the hospital where you plan to deliver or visit your hospital’s website or click here. 10 things labor partners can help with:  Help monitor/coach partner thru contractions. Ask mom what you can do to help make her comfortable and support her (distraction, touch, breathing, music, pain relief, etc.).  Be her advocate and get to know the staff – you are part of the team. Understand what she’s going through is hard, exhausting and things don’t always go as planned. Be open to changes that may occur.  Encourage and support her through each stage. Sometimes just sitting next to her can be enough of support. Offer to hold her leg during pushing if necessary. Ask to be involved with process (cutting umbilical cord, helping with delivery). Enjoy the miracle of birth and your new baby. Participate in skin-to-skin with your baby to start bonding. Make sure to ask questions if you have them. We can accommodate you and your partner within reason. Feel comfortable enough to speak your thoughts.  The Baby Your Baby program provides many resources for all pregnant women and new moms in Utah. There is also expert advice from the Utah Department of Health and Intermountain Healthcare that air each week on KUTV 2News. 
16:31
July 19, 2019
Genetic testing
Some women may consider genetic testing when they are pregnant. Screening and diagnostic tests can help women find out about the genetic abnormalities of their unborn baby. Holly Menino sits down with Lauren Eekhoof, a genetics counselor with Intermountain Healthcare, on this episode of the Baby Your Baby Podcast. Together, they discuss how genetic testing is done and when you should meet with a counselor. How are genetic tests done and what conditions do these tests look for? Screening tests are blood tests that screen for common conditions like Down syndrome and other extra chromosome conditions. These tests are optional. Diagnostic tests are more invasive procedures that can provide a diagnosis for chromosome conditions in the pregnancy and typically are done if there is a high risk for a genetic condition in the pregnancy. These tests are also optional. When might you want to meet with a genetic counselor if you’re pregnant or thinking about getting pregnant? women who’ll be over age 35 at delivery women who’ve had an abnormal genetic test result women with abnormal ultrasound findings  women who’ve had a previous pregnancy with a genetic abnormality  couples with a family history of a genetic condition What do genetic counselors do? A genetics counselor can help you weigh the benefits, risks and limitations of genetic testing and provide information about the nature, inheritance, and implications of genetic disorders to help you make informed decisions. What are some reasons to do or not do genetic testing? Most pregnancies are uncomplicated, most babies are born healthy and no test will ensure the birth of a healthy baby. Some women may choose not to do genetic testing as this may cause anxiety during the pregnancy. Some women choose genetic testing for reassurance or for planning purposes. How accurate are the screening tests? It’s important to remember screening tests will never be 100 percent diagnostic. Each screening has a detection rate for different conditions as well as false positive and false negative rates. A normal screening result can be reassuring and makes the likelihood of those conditions in the pregnancy low. An abnormal screening is NOT a diagnosis and requires further investigation which may or may not involve diagnostic testing if a woman chooses. What are the risks of the more invasive genetic tests? There is a risk for pregnancy loss of about 1:300 to 1:500 procedures with various genetic tests. Women who choose a diagnostic testing procedure can weigh the benefits of diagnostic results with the possible risks of the procedures and would benefit from seeing a genetic counselor. To find a genetic counselor or for more information on genetic testing click here. The Baby Your Baby program provides many resources for all pregnant women and new moms in Utah. There is also expert advice from the Utah Department of Health and Intermountain Healthcare that air each week on KUTV 2News.
14:06
July 12, 2019
Postpartum anxiety and OCD
Anxiety and obsessive-compulsive disorders are fairly common during pregnancy and postpartum. 1 n 7 women have mood disorders. The disorders often begin during pregnancy, but may not be recognized until the postpartum period. Holly Menino sits down with psychiatrist Kelly Irons, MD, from the Intermountain Avenues Women's Center, on this episode of the Baby Your Baby Podcast. Together, they discuss the signs and treatments of mood disorders.  Why might women be susceptible to this during this time? Drastic hormone shifts occur during pregnancy and postpartum in the body and can affect the brain If you have a history of past behavioral health symptoms Life stressors: medical complications for mom or baby, job change, death of a loved one, moving, etc. Who is at risk? History or family history of behavioral health issues Traumatic labor and delivery Medical complications Isolation or lack of support from family and friends What are the signs of postpartum anxiety? Worry more than normal about the newborn (reasonable dose of worry is healthy) Terrified of hurting the baby Become irrational Panic attacks Can’t fall asleep or stay asleep Shortness of breath Heart palpitations Numbness in fingers Nausea, feeling faint Can’t think straight Duration of these feelings can be minutes or up to an hour. It is important to seek treatment, since anxiety can prevent proper bonding. What are the signs of postpartum OCD? Intrusive thought become prevalent and occur often Taking action to avoid intrusive thoughts Checking things over and over (checking that locks are locked, bath water is not too hot, avoiding picking up dangerous tools) A wrong, terrible thought it OCD, not psychosis. Psychosis is when thought and emotions are so impaired that contact is lost with external reality. Irrational thoughts become something you see yourself actually doing. Untreated anxiety or OCD combined with lack of sleep can lead to psychosis. Talk to your OB/Gyn if you have these symptoms and believe you need help. They can refer you to a behavioral health provider. The Baby Your Baby program provides many resources for all pregnant women and new moms in Utah. There is also expert advice from the Utah Department of Health and Intermountain Healthcare that air each week on KUTV 2News.
16:26
July 5, 2019
Nutrition during pregnancy
During pregnancy it is important to eat healthy foods for both you and the baby. Eating a variety of all of the food groups will help you to consume the nutrients that you need for you and your baby to stay healthy. Holly Menino sits down with Danielle Conlon, a Registered Dietitian Nutritionist with Utah State WIC Program, on this episode of the Baby Your Baby podcast. Together, they discuss nutrition during pregnancy, weight gain guidelines, and tips for preparing to breastfeed.  Prenatal Vitamins: Once you become pregnant, your doctor will prescribe a prenatal vitamin for you. The reason why it is important to take a prenatal vitamin during pregnancy is because nutrient needs increase during pregnancy, and prenatal vitamins will help you to meet those increased nutrient needs. Two of the nutrients that prenatal vitamins contain and that are critical during pregnancy are folic acid and iron. Folic acid helps to prevent birth defects, and iron helps your baby grow and develop. Which Foods to Eat: During pregnancy, eating a variety of all of the food groups will help you to consume the nutrients that you need for you and your baby to stay healthy. General recommendations for each food group include:  Eat whole grains such as whole wheat bread, whole wheat pasta, and brown rice.  Eat a variety of fruits and vegetables each day. These can include fresh, canned, or frozen fruits and vegetables. When buying canned fruits and vegetables, look for “low-sodium” and “no-added sugar” or “canned in water” labels on the cans. These are healthier choices than canned fruits and vegetables that contain high levels of sodium and sugar.  Eat 3 servings of dairy foods each day. Dairy foods have calcium, which is essential to make sure that yours and your baby’s bones are strong. Dairy products include milk, cheese, and yogurt. If you aren’t able to have dairy products, soy milk is a great source of protein and calcium that is dairy free. You can also talk to your doctor about if you should start a calcium supplement.  Eat healthy fats from oils such as avocados, olive or canola oil, or nuts and seeds.  Eat a variety of lean protein foods such as poultry, fish, eggs, beans/lentils, PB, and nuts or seeds. A common question about protein is if fish is safe to eat during pregnancy. Fish is safe during pregnancy as long as the fish doesn’t have high levels of mercury and it is cooked all the way through. During pregnancy, avoid raw fish such as sashimi or sushi that has raw fish, and fish with high mercury content such as tilefish, swordfish, king mackerel, or shark. Foods to avoid during pregnancy: meats, poultry, and fish that aren’t cooked well-done unpasteurized or “raw” milk and juice raw or runny eggs raw sprouts deli meats and hotdogs unless they are cooked until they are steaming or reach a temperature of 165 F soft cheeses such as feta, brie, or queso fresco  The Baby Your Baby program provides many resources for all pregnant women and new moms in Utah. There is also expert advice from the Utah Department of Health and Intermountain Healthcare that air each week on KUTV 2News. 
13:50
June 28, 2019
What to bring to the hospital when you go into labor
During your third trimester, it is time to start thinking about what to bring to the hospital when you go into labor. There are some essentials that mom and dad need to pack ahead of time, but the hospital will also provide you with some things. Holly Menino sits down with Nurse Diana Jensen from Intermountain Medical Center in this week’s Baby Your Baby podcast. They discuss what you should bring, what you should leave at home and what the baby will need.  What you should bring to the hospital: Nightgown (front-opening styles are easier for breast-feeding) Bathrobe Slippers Bras (nursing style if you plan to breast-feed your baby) Cosmetics and toiletries Pillow (hospital has pillows, but some patients prefer to bring their own) Journal, Thank You cards, writing paper, and pen Phone, camera, film or memory card, extra batteries, and chargers Clothes for you and your baby to wear home. For your baby, we suggest you bring a shirt, gown, hat, receiving blanket, and a heavier blanket (depending on the weather.) For you, clothes that fit in mid-pregnancy are usually best. Pacifiers – some babies don’t like the ones from the hospital and it’s always good to have extras Burp Cloths Birthing Plan Car Seat - this has to be installed in the care and checked to make sure the baby is in right before you leave. Make sure you’re current on your immunizations Choose a primary care provider for your baby What you shouldn't bring: Any personal valuables, such as, jewelry, credit cards, or cash. Intermountain hospitals provide: Diapers, wipes, nasal aspirators, onesies The Baby Your Baby program provides many resources for all pregnant women and new moms in Utah. There is also expert advice from the Utah Department of Health and Intermountain Healthcare that air each week on KUTV 2News. 
10:59
June 21, 2019
Taking medications during pregnancy
Moms may feel like they shouldn’t take medications during pregnancy to protect the baby  but, the illness or condition may be more harmful for the baby than the medication. Toughing out an illness usually isn’t better for baby. Holly Menino sits down with Al Romeo, a registered nurse with the Utah Department of Health’s MotherToBaby/Pregnancy Risk Line program on this episode of the Baby Your Baby Podcast. Together they discuss the risks and benefits of taking certain medications and vitamins.  *Correction: Carbamazepine use in pregnancy may have an increased risk of approximately 1% for neural tube defects (spina bifida). Ondansetron (Zofran) use in pregnancy is not associated with an increased risk of neural tube defects (spina bifida). *   There is always a chance for a baby to have a birth defect since the background chance for a major birth defect for all healthy pregnancies is between 3% to 5%. When we look at the research studies, we expect to see some birth defects in each study. We are looking to see if the rate of birth defects is higher than that background risk and we are looking for the same pattern across the studies.    Sometimes the condition is worse than the medication. Talk to your doctor to weigh the risks and benefits especially when it comes to fever, depression and diabetes. Some vaccines do more to protect mom while other vaccines do more to protect baby. We’ll talk about 3 common vaccines. The influenza vaccine helps protect mom from the flu virus. Having the flu during pregnancy increases the chance that mom will have difficulty breathing and adults can die from complications of the flu. The varicella, or chicken pox, vaccine is one that helps protect baby. Getting the chicken pox vaccine before pregnancy helps mom avoid chicken pox during pregnancy which can lead to scarring in the fetus, limb defects, eye defects, and other complications. The tDap vaccine, tetnaus, diptheria, and pertussis, helps protect baby. Getting the Tdap vaccine late in pregnancy gives a boost of immunity just before baby is born in case baby gets exposed to whooping cough, which can be deadly for baby. Listen to our podcast about immunizations here. Protecting baby sometimes means that mom has to take care of her own health so that those illnesses and chronic conditions don’t harm the baby. It’s a complex balance that may require different decisions for different situations based on mom’s medical condition. If moms or providers have concerns or questions about a particular medication or the situation, they can contact  MotherToBaby.utah.gov. The Baby Your Baby program provides many resources for all pregnant women and new moms in Utah. There is also expert advice from the Utah Department of Health and Intermountain Healthcare that air each week on KUTV 2News. 
31:21
June 14, 2019
Summer safety for kids
It’s summer — and a great time for families to spend fun days in the sun! Just remember to use extra caution with kids around water and cars to prevent tragedy — especially as we transition to summer and our schedules change. Holly Menino sits down with Jessica Strong, Community Health Manager at Intermountain Primary Children's Hospital, in this week's Baby Your Baby Podcast. They discuss three of the most dangerous ways kids can be injured during the summer and give tips on how to avoid a tragedy.  Water Safety In Utah, drowning is the second leading cause of death for children under age 14. Teach your children to swim and always supervise them around water. Use extra caution and care to supervise children near lakes, rivers and streams.   Water at any depth can be hazardous.    Prevent Heatstroke: Never Leave A Child Alone in a Vehicle About 40 children across the country die each year after being left in a hot vehicle. Of these fatalities, 87 percent are children ages 3 years and younger.  Never leave your child alone in a vehicle – even for a few minutes. A child’s body temperature can increase 3-5 times faster than an adult’s.  Keep a visual reminder that a child is with you. Place a stuffed animal or diaper bag in the seat next to you Place something you will need when you arrive at your destination in the back seat, like a cell phone or purse Order your free Baby Safety Snap at PrimaryChildrens.org/safetysnap. If you see a child left alone in a car, contact the police or call 911. Spot the Tot During warm weather months, Utah children are at increased risk for being accidentally run over by a vehicle in a driveway or parking lot, most often by a parent or caregiver.  Prevent injury by doing these three things: Walk completely around the car before getting in to drive Eliminate distractions (put phone away, turn off music) Roll down windows and listen before backing up    Additional Information & Resources: -Visit primarychildren’s.org/safety for more tips on how to keep kids safe this summer. -Primary Children’s “Hold On To Dear Life” Water Safety PSA: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2vuSAzkBkwk&list=PL84577120D5FE83BE&index=20 -Child Backovers: National Data can be found here https://www.kidsandcars.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/backover-19-map.pdf -Kids and Cars safety information: https://www.kidsandcars.org/ The Baby Your Baby program provides many resources for all pregnant women and new moms in Utah. There is also expert advice from the Utah Department of Health and Intermountain Healthcare that air each week on KUTV 2News. 
13:13
June 7, 2019
Importance of baby teeth & mom's oral health
The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services reports that dental decay is the most prevalent infectious disease in our nation's children. By the age of three, 5-10% of U.S. children have oral health issues; and by the age of five, about 60% of kids will have had at least one cavity. Children with oral health issues are more likely to experience oral pain, miss school, and perform poorly academically.  In this week's episode of the Baby Your Baby Podcast, Holly Menino heads up to Intermountain Primary Children's Hospital to talk with Dr. Hans Reinemer, DMD, Residency Program Director for Pediatric Dentistry. They discuss the importance of baby teeth and explain why mom's oral health is extremely important, not just for her own teeth, but to the health of her child's mouth as well.  Download & Subscribe on Apple Podcasts Want to listen on another platform? Click here. The Baby Your Baby program provides many resources for all pregnant women and new moms in Utah. There is also expert advice from the Utah Department of Health and Intermountain Healthcare that air each week on KUTV 2News.
13:39
May 31, 2019
Autism spectrum disorder
Autism spectrum disorder (ASD), is complex condition that refers to a person who has challenges with social skills, repetitive behaviors, and communication — both verbal and nonverbal. According to the Centers for Disease Control, autism affects an estimated 1 in 59 children in the United States. Signs of autism usually appear by 2-3 years of age, however some indicators can diagnose autism even earlier. For people with autism, research shows intervention is key to positive outcomes later in life.  In this week's Baby Your Baby Podcast, Holly Menino sits down with Colin Kingsbury, the Autism Systems Development Program Manager at the Utah Department of Health, and Dr. Amanda Bakian, Principal Investigator of the CDC's Autism and Developmental Disabilities Program in Utah. Together they discuss what parents need to know about autism spectrum disorder.  Resources: Utah Department of Health Medical Home Portal Utah Parent Center Autism Council of Utah  The Baby Your Baby program provides many resources for all pregnant women and new moms in Utah. There is also expert advice from the Utah Department of Health and Intermountain Healthcare that air each week on KUTV 2News.
22:28
May 24, 2019
Down syndrome — "Our Sweet Gwendolyn"
It wasn't what they ordered, but an extra chromosome is what they got. For Jessica and Josh Egan, the news that their baby had Down Syndrome was difficult to receive. However, they now see this change in their order as an upgrade — as described in their birth announcement.  In this week’s Baby Your Baby Podcast episode, Holly Menino sits down with Jessica and Josh Egan to talk about their journey to becoming parents.  They talk about the emotional roller coaster they went through during IVF, pregnancy, genetic testing, discovering that Baby Gwen had an extra chromosome, and what it was like when they're birth announcement went viral.  You can follow Baby Gwen and the Egans on Instagram or Facebook.  The Baby Your Baby program provides many resources for all pregnant women and new moms in Utah. There is also expert advice from the Utah Department of Health and Intermountain Healthcare that air each week on KUTV 2News. 
24:09
May 17, 2019
Anesthesia & kids
It can be scary as both a parent and a kid if your child needs to have surgery. Many parents have questions about their child undergoing anesthesia. It can also be hard to describe and prepare your child for the experience.  In this week's episode of the Baby Your Baby Podcast, Holly Menino heads up to Intermountain Primary Children's Hospital to talk with Dr. Erin Hinich, a pediatric anesthesiologist. Together they discuss what parents need to know about anesthesia and kids and how to help prepare your little one if they need surgery.  The Baby Your Baby program provides many resources for all pregnant women and new moms in Utah. There is also expert advice from the Utah Department of Health and Intermountain Healthcare that air each week on KUTV 2News. 
20:46
May 10, 2019
Postpartum depression — take care of yourself, think SNOWBALL
Welcoming a new baby into your family is one of the most joyous experiences life has to offer, but it can also be one of the most stressful. Many new moms struggle with the baby blues after giving birth, and one in seven moms will suffer from postpartum depression.  Holly Menino sits down with Intermountain Medical Center's Diana Jensen, RN in this week's episode of the Baby Your Baby podcast to talk about Postpartum Depression and how new and expecting moms can manage their mental health by using the acronym SNOWBALL.  Take Care of Yourself – think SNOWBALL Remember how to take care of yourself after birth by implementing SNOWBALL. S is for Sleep – Make sure you’re getting enough rest. When you’re tired you aren’t thinking clearly and your mood may suffer. N is for Nutrition – Eating food that’s good for you will help you recover and is especially important if you’re breastfeeding. O is for Omega 3 Fatty Acids – Fish oils have been proven to reduce anxiety and depression in new moms. W is for Walking – Exercise will improve your mood and help your body recover from giving birth. B is for Baby Breaks – Take some time away from your baby. It can help you feel more like yourself again. A is for Adult Time – Spending time with other adults your partner or your friends will help you maintain important relationships. L is for Liquids – Try to drink at least two quarts of water daily. L is for Laughter – Remember to laugh and give yourself a break. Life with a new baby requires a sense of humor. If you or someone you know is experiencing postpartum depression, don’t wait until it’s an emergency!  The Baby Your Baby program provides many resources for all pregnant women and new moms in Utah. There is also expert advice from the Utah Department of Health and Intermountain Healthcare that air each week on KUTV 2News.
12:58
May 3, 2019
How vaccines help achieve community immunity
In the year 2000, measles was nearly eradicated in the United States according to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC). Since then, measles outbreaks have been popping up all over the country despite a vaccine being available.   For this week's Baby Your Baby Podcast, Holly Menino talks with Rich Lakin, the Utah Department of Health's Immunization Program Manager, about why vaccines are so important to achieve community immunity against vaccine preventable diseases.  What can happen if a large number of people in a community aren’t vaccinated or choose not to vaccinate against preventable diseases like measles? Community or herd immunity is a form of protection from a disease that occurs when a large percentage of the population has become immune to it, most often through vaccination. If a high enough number of people are vaccinated against vaccine preventable diseases, such as measles, this helps protect individuals who may not be able to receive a vaccine because of immunocompromised conditions. This means people who have a compromised immune system – for example, someone who has had an organ transplant or is receiving radiation or chemotherapy for cancer - can still be protected and have less chances of suffering from these diseases. Some vaccine preventable diseases – such as measles - are so contagious that if one person has it, 90% of the people close to that person who are not immune to it will also become infected. This is what can happen during a measles outbreak. Infected people can spread measles to others from four days before, through four days after the rash appears. People who have been vaccinated can still get measles, but there is only a small chance of this happening. Only about 3% of people who receive two doses of the measles vaccine will get measles if they come in contact with someone who has the virus. If a person is fully vaccinated, and does come down with measles, they are more likely to have a mild case of the illness. So why do people who are vaccinated and come in contact with an infected person still run the risk of getting measles? There is still a possibility because everyone’s uptake of a vaccine is different. One individual may only have a response rate of 70% when receiving the vaccine, and another person could have a response rate of 90%. If the person with a response rate of 70% is exposed, you could say that their chance is 30% higher of getting the disease than the person whose vaccine response rate is 90%. This does not mean the vaccine didn’t work. Another consideration affecting the how much protection a vaccine will provide is storage and handling of the vaccine. If the vaccine is compromised because it wasn’t stored at the proper temperature or there were temperature changes during transportation, it could make it less effective. The infectious nature of vaccine preventable diseases like measles makes it easy to spread in our communities if we are not properly vaccinated. That’s why we recommend everyone healthy enough to receive the vaccine get the full two doses of the MMR vaccine. Not only will this protect you from getting sick, but it will help protect your family and friends, neighbors, classmates, and coworkers. The Baby Your Baby program provides many resources for all pregnant women and new moms in Utah. There is also expert advice from the Utah Department of Health and Intermountain Healthcare that air each week on KUTV 2News. 
16:12
April 26, 2019
Giving medicine to young kids
Is your child sick? If so, they might need some medicine. However, as a parent, it can sometimes be tricky to make sure they’re not getting too much or too little. In this week’s Baby Your Baby Podcast episode, Holly Menino heads up to Intermountain Primary Children’s Hospital to talk with Bevan Jensen, PharmD. Together they go through what parents need to know about giving medicine to young children. ----------- When giving medicine to kids, getting the dose right can be a challenge. Jensen has a few tips to make it a little bit easier for parents.   1. Avoid kitchen spoons  Spoons you would use to eat food are not a standard size. Instead, it’s best to use an oral syringe to keep your child safe and ensure they’re getting the right amount. If the medicine came with a dosing cup, then that is also appropriate.  2.  Bottle stoppers Bottle stoppers can make using an oral syringe much easier. To use…just stick the syringe into the stopper, flip the bottle upside-down, and then draw out the prescribed dose of medicine.  3. Read the label carefully  4. Keep medication away from kids  Lock up medicine and keep it up high when storing. Make sure all medicine has a safety cap — safety caps are not child-proof but are child-resistant.  5. Don’t mix medications If your child has to take more than one medication — for example an antibiotic and something for pain — have a conversation with your pharmacist. Ask about whether you can give the medications at the same time or if they need to be spaced out. Talk about whether they should or should not have their medicine with food as well as proper spacing between doses.  6. Cough medicine is not recommended for young kids There are risks to using cough medicine in children under the age of six, according to the FDA. For babies who are OVER the age of one, a spoonful of honey can help soothe the urge to cough.   If you have any questions about medicine as it relates to kids, talk to your pharmacist. They are an incredible resources and are happy to answer any questions you have.  If you accidentally give your child too much medicine, give the Utah Poison Control Center (UPCC) a call. They are available 24/7 at the number 1-800-222-1222.    The Baby Your Baby program provides many resources for all pregnant women and new moms in Utah. There is also expert advice from the Utah Department of Health and Intermountain Healthcare that air each week on KUTV 2News.
15:31
April 19, 2019
What to do before pregnancy & after becoming pregnant
In this week's episode of the Baby Your Baby Podcast, Holly Menino sits down with Nurse Dani from Intermountain Moms to talk about what a woman needs to do before pregnancy and what to do after finding out she's pregnant.  What a woman needs to do before pregnancy:  The Centers for Disease Control has challenged women to make a PACT with themselves to do what it takes to be as healthy as possible before getting pregnant:  P-Planning Ahead • Take a prenatal vitamin. Neural tube defects like spina bifida can result from not having enough folic acid in your system during the first couple of weeks following conception (before you even know you’re pregnant).  A—Avoiding Harmful Substances • Avoid alcohol, tobacco products, illicit street drugs, and ask your doctor before taking over-the-counter and prescription medications as well as herbal supplements. • Avoid exposure to radiation, toxic chemicals, and sexually transmitted infections.  C—Choose a Healthy Lifestyle • Talk with your doctor before you get pregnant. Schedule a preconception appointment to have your blood pressure, thyroid, blood sugar, weight, and overall health checked. Exercise and eat a healthy diet  T—Talk with Your Healthcare Provider • It’s important to be educated about risks that apply to everyone and risks that apply specifically to you. Risks specific to you will depend on your history: preterm labor, history of c/sections, history of preeclampsia, advanced age, obesity, etc. • Your provider will talk about immunizations you should get during pregnancy such as the flu shot and a Tdap booster shot.  What a woman needs to do after finding out she's pregnant:  That moment when you see a positive pregnancy test is quite possibly one of the most exciting moments women might experience. But after you see that, you may or may not know what to do next. Nurse Dani says women should — Take A STEP.  Take a prenatal vitamin • Make sure that you're taking a prenatal vitamin each day—one that has at least 400 micrograms of folic acid in it—to prevent spina bifida.  Avoid alcohol — there is no safe amount to consume while pregnant • Drinking alcohol during pregnancy can cause lifelong physical, behavioral, and intellectual disabilities. Drinking alcohol during pregnancy can cause miscarriage, stillbirth, and a range of lifelong physical, behavioral, and intellectual disabilities. These disabilities are known as fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASDs).  Schedule your first prenatal appointment • Your first prenatal appointment should happen by the 13th week of pregnancy, and you should plan on having at least 13 appointments over the course of the pregnancy.  Think twice about all medications • Talk with your doctor before taking prescription, over-the-counter, or herbal medications. They'll decide what's okay for pregnancy.  Exercise Pick a Provider • Make sure they're covered by your insurance, their location is convenient and not too far from home, find out what hospital you'd like to deliver at and pick a provider that has privileges there, think about the dynamics of group coverage. The Baby Your Baby program provides many resources for all pregnant women and new moms in Utah. There is also expert advice from the Utah Department of Health and Intermountain Healthcare that air each week on KUTV 2News.
20:05
April 12, 2019
What is Baby Your Baby?
Baby Your Baby is a program that focuses on making sure expecting mothers get recommended prenatal care. From financial help to preparing for pregnancy, Baby Your Baby helps guide new parents through the pregnancy process, birth, as well as the first few years of being a parent.  In this first episode of the Baby Your Baby Podcast, Holly Menino talks with Marie Nagata from the Utah Department of Health about the history of the Baby Your Baby program, resources available to new and expecting moms, as well as financial help available for low income women.  What is Baby Your Baby? Baby Your Baby is a program at the Utah Department of Health to help low income women receive prenatal care early on in their pregnancy. Baby Your Baby pays for doctor’s visits until a woman can get on Medicaid. Every woman should see her doctor as soon as she knows she’s pregnant. The program does not want anyone to wait to see a doctor, while she is waiting on paperwork to go through. Thirteen Weeks and Thirteen Visits: All pregnant women should have their first doctor’s appointment by their 13th week of pregnancy and visit their doctor at least 13 times throughout their pregnancy. Most first time moms are good about going to their doctor throughout their pregnancy. The problem most often seen with women not getting the prenatal care they need, usually comes with moms who are having their 2nd, 3rd or 4th baby. Sometimes women think that because their other pregnancies were fine, this one will be the same. Every pregnancy, and every baby, are different. It is important that with every pregnancy, a woman sees her doctor before the 13th week of pregnancy, and at least 13 times throughout her pregnancy. Testing for things like Gestational Diabetes and other health problems that often occur during pregnancy is important to the health of your baby. Using Gestational Diabetes as an example, we see many women who haven’t had Gestational Diabetes during previous pregnancies, who get it during their 3rd or 4th pregnancy. Gestational Diabetes can have severe health effects on both mother and baby, so it’s important to see your doctor and make sure you are getting the right tests. This is just one example of something that could show up in one pregnancy and not have occurred in another. That is why it is so important to make sure you are seeing your doctor 13 times during your pregnancy. Getting signed up for Baby Your Baby: Getting signed up for Baby Your Baby is easy. You can call 1-800-826-9662 or apply online.  Resources: Even if you don’t qualify for financial help through the Baby Your Baby program, there are many resources for all pregnant women and new moms in Utah. The Baby Your Baby website contains resources with information from before you get pregnant, until your baby is 5 years old. There is also expert advice from the Utah Department of Health and Intermountain Healthcare that air each week on KUTV 2News.
08:20
April 5, 2019