Baby Your Baby

Taking medications during pregnancy

An episode of Baby Your Baby

By KUTV 2News
Welcome to the KUTV 2News Baby Your Baby podcast. Here we talk about pregnancy, having a baby, and all things parenting.

Sponsored by the Utah Department of Health and Intermountain Healthcare.
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Down syndrome
Down syndrome is the most common chromosomal disorder. About 1 in 800 babies are born with it. Holly Menino sits down with Dr. Jennifer Goldman-Luthy, an assistant professor of pediatrics at the University of Utah and works in the University Pediatric Clinic and the University Hospital Nursery, on this episode of the Baby Your Baby Podcast. Together, they discuss Down syndrome, how it is diagnosed and how it impacts a newborn baby.   What are the symptoms of Down syndrome?  Facial features can include epicanthal folds (the way the eyelids cover the inner corner of the eye) and upslanting eyes, sometimes with white spots in the colored part of the eye (Brushfield spots); low set, small ears; flatter nose and flatter face; small mouth or tongue that sticks out. The body can have: short neck with extra skin at the back of the neck, a single palmar crease, wide hands with shorter fingers, short stature, a deep groove between the first and second toes. Mild to severe intellectual disability (most are mild to moderate). Low muscle tone which can make it harder to roll over, sit up, and walk as early as other kids, and can make it hard to swallow safely. Increased risk for: congenital heart defects, problems with development of the intestines or not swallowing safely, reflux, constipation, respiratory/breathing problems including sleep apnea, impaired hearing, vision problems like cataracts, celiac disease, Alzheimer's disease, childhood leukemia or other blood disorders, thyroid conditions, problems with the stability of the upper spine, shorter attention span and impulsivity, delayed speech, repetitive mannerisms (tics), autism, and behavioral problems.  How is it diagnosed? During pregnancy: Routine pregnancy screening could detect about 90% of babies with Down syndrome. Not all choose to get the screening done. To learn about screenings and genetic testing listing to this episode of the Baby Your Baby Podcast. So only about 50% of babies with Down syndrome are detected before delivery. How can I learn more about Down syndrome? Medical Home Portal website National Down Syndrome Congress website National Down Syndrome Society website To learn about Baby Gwen and her parents' journey after learning Gwen had down syndrome, click here. The Baby Your Baby program provides many resources for all pregnant women and new moms in Utah. There is also expert advice from the Utah Department of Health and Intermountain Healthcare that air each week on KUTV 2News.
16:52
August 16, 2019
Recognizing and preventing child abuse
Child abuse is something we don’t talk much about, but we need to talk about in order to stop it. Holly Menino sits down with Dr. Corey Rood, a child abuse pediatrician at the University of Utah School of Medicine and Primary Children’s Hospital, on this episode of the Baby Your Baby Podcast. Together they discuss how to recognize child abuse and what to do if you suspect it.  1 in 5 kids will be sexually abused nation wide before they turn 18. Last year, there were 10,600 substantiated victims of child abuse in Utah. In 2017, 1,720 kids died nationwide due to child abuse. The number of children who die of child abuse is about the same number of kids who die of cancer in a year. Cancer isn’t fully curable or preventable yet, but child abuse is.  If you see something, say something! Utah adults by law are obligated to report suspected child abuse.  Abuse is any action that causes or threatens harm.  Forms of abuse can include: Physical  Neglect  Emotional  Sexual If you see or suspect child abuse: Report it. It’s your responsibility. To report child abuse: Call the Child Abuse/Neglect Hotline 1-855-323-DCFS (3237) Call Law Enforcement  Reporting is anonymous and safe. You don’t have to confront someone you suspect is harming a child. For more information on preventing and reporting child abuse, click here. The Baby Your Baby program provides many resources for all pregnant women and new moms in Utah. There is also expert advice from the Utah Department of Health and Intermountain Healthcare that air each week on KUTV 2News.
15:28
August 9, 2019
Potty Training
When your child is between the age of 18 months and 3-years-old, it's time to start thinking about potty training. The best time to start is when your child starts to show an interest in the potty. Holly Menino sits down with Jackie Swan, the early Intervention Program Director at Summit County Health Department on this episode of the Baby Your Baby Podcast.  Together they discuss when to know if your child is ready for potty training and the best ways to teach them.  Question: What are signs that children are ready for potty training? Answer: Around 18 months, children develop control over their bowel and bladder. Some kids are ready at 18 months and some at age 3. Your child is ready when they stay dry for at least two hours at a time, recognize that they are urinating or having a bowel movement, develops physical skills that are critical for potty training including walking, pulling down pants, getting onto potty, coping parents toiling behavior, follows simple instructions, wants to wear big boy pants, doesn’t like to be in soiled diaper and asks to be changed. Question: What are some pre-training tips? Answer: Take trips to the bathroom to practice the routine, even when the child is still wearing diapers, change the diaper in the bathroom. Question: What are signs not to start potty training? Answer: When your child is going through significant changes in their life, it might be a good time to wait. Examples include: moving, change of child care arrangements, switching crib to bed, new baby, illness, death in family or crisis. If it’s a stressful time and you see more accidents, this is normal. Take a break and come back when things have settled down.  Question: What should I avoid when potty training? Answer: Be matter of fact and without lots of emotion, toilet training can have lots of power struggles because the toddler wants control. Don’t force your toddler to use the toilet, avoid power struggles, don’t talk about potty training or doing anything about it for a while until your child shows signs of readiness and interest again.  Once Upon a Potty and Everyone Poops are two recommended books to read with your child. The Baby Your Baby program provides many resources for all pregnant women and new moms in Utah. There is also expert advice from the Utah Department of Health and Intermountain Healthcare that air each week on KUTV 2News.
11:47
August 2, 2019
Post-maternity leave
If you are returning to work after having a baby, you will need to start planning weeks ahead of time. Sometimes, you even need to start while you're still pregnant. Holly Menino sat down with nurse Dani Kurtz from Intermountain Moms on this episode of the Baby Your Baby Podcast. Together, they discuss how to prepare yourself and your baby for going back to work.  Daycare: who you’re going to leave your baby with is probably one of the most stressful aspects of going back to work. Search during early pregnancy for daycare. Factors to consider when choosing a daycare. Once you’ve picked a daycare, get to know them. Downside: illness. It’s bound to happen. Pro: socialization Separation Anxiety: parents have more of it than babies. At the young age of 2-3 months when mothers typically go back to work, a baby doesn’t understand object permanence You can give your baby smaller and shorter doses of separation at home before having to do it the first time. While on maternity leave look for opportunities to leave your baby with a trusted caregiver for short amounts of time-go on a date, run some errands by yourself. That dreaded moment when you leave your crying baby in someone else’s arms is rough—but rest assured that you’ll probably cry more than your child. Breastfeeding/Pumping: how does it all work when going back to work? It is definitely possible to continue nursing a baby after going back to work! The key is maintaining milk supply by pumping about as often as your baby eats while you’re gone. Nurse in the morning before leaving for work and plan the rest of your day’s pumping schedule off of that first feeding. Talk with your boss about a safe and comfortable place to pump while you’re at work. To be most efficient, purchase or rent an electric double breast pump Be prepared with videos of your baby cooing and crying  Plan ahead Pack bags and plan outfits the night before. Do whatever you can to make the morning easier. If possible, make plans with your boss to work from home part time. Make time for you. This is much easier said than done, but think of yourself as a cell phone with limited battery power. If you don’t get charged, you’ll be just like your phone and shut down. At that point, you’re no good to yourself or anyone else! For more information click here.  The Baby Your Baby program provides many resources for all pregnant women and new moms in Utah. There is also expert advice from the Utah Department of Health and Intermountain Healthcare that air each week on KUTV 2News. 
18:36
July 26, 2019
How partners can help during labor, delivery and postpartum
When your partner is getting ready to give birth for the first time, Dads or significant others may not know what to expect or how to be involved or even wonder how much their being involved makes a difference. Studies prove that when fathers or partners are involved before, during and after a baby’s birth there are numerous benefits to the mom and the baby. Holly Menino sat down with Hollie Wharton, DNP, CNM, WHNP, a midwife and nurse practitioner at Intermountain Alta View Women’s Clinic on this episode of the Baby Your Baby Podcast. Together, they discuss the important role of partners during and after childbirth.  Benefits of Father/Partner Involvement Mother more likely to have early, regular prenatal care Parents more likely to attend pre/postnatal classes Mother more likely to breastfeed, continue breastfeeding Maternal smoking and alcohol abuse rates reduced Reduced anxiety  Less perceived pain  Greater satisfaction with the birth experience  Lower rates of postnatal depression  Lower rates of premature birth and infant mortality  Father more likely to take an active role  Father feels empowered rather than helpless A childbirth preparation class can help prepare you and your partner for labor and delivery Intermountain Healthcare hospitals offer one-day options on Saturdays or one evening a week for a few weeks. They can help you know what to expect during labor and what to expect at the hospital and how to prepare. To find Intermountain childbirth classes, call the hospital where you plan to deliver or visit your hospital’s website or click here. 10 things labor partners can help with:  Help monitor/coach partner thru contractions. Ask mom what you can do to help make her comfortable and support her (distraction, touch, breathing, music, pain relief, etc.).  Be her advocate and get to know the staff – you are part of the team. Understand what she’s going through is hard, exhausting and things don’t always go as planned. Be open to changes that may occur.  Encourage and support her through each stage. Sometimes just sitting next to her can be enough of support. Offer to hold her leg during pushing if necessary. Ask to be involved with process (cutting umbilical cord, helping with delivery). Enjoy the miracle of birth and your new baby. Participate in skin-to-skin with your baby to start bonding. Make sure to ask questions if you have them. We can accommodate you and your partner within reason. Feel comfortable enough to speak your thoughts.  The Baby Your Baby program provides many resources for all pregnant women and new moms in Utah. There is also expert advice from the Utah Department of Health and Intermountain Healthcare that air each week on KUTV 2News. 
16:31
July 19, 2019
Genetic testing
Some women may consider genetic testing when they are pregnant. Screening and diagnostic tests can help women find out about the genetic abnormalities of their unborn baby. Holly Menino sits down with Lauren Eekhoof, a genetics counselor with Intermountain Healthcare, on this episode of the Baby Your Baby Podcast. Together, they discuss how genetic testing is done and when you should meet with a counselor. How are genetic tests done and what conditions do these tests look for? Screening tests are blood tests that screen for common conditions like Down syndrome and other extra chromosome conditions. These tests are optional. Diagnostic tests are more invasive procedures that can provide a diagnosis for chromosome conditions in the pregnancy and typically are done if there is a high risk for a genetic condition in the pregnancy. These tests are also optional. When might you want to meet with a genetic counselor if you’re pregnant or thinking about getting pregnant? women who’ll be over age 35 at delivery women who’ve had an abnormal genetic test result women with abnormal ultrasound findings  women who’ve had a previous pregnancy with a genetic abnormality  couples with a family history of a genetic condition What do genetic counselors do? A genetics counselor can help you weigh the benefits, risks and limitations of genetic testing and provide information about the nature, inheritance, and implications of genetic disorders to help you make informed decisions. What are some reasons to do or not do genetic testing? Most pregnancies are uncomplicated, most babies are born healthy and no test will ensure the birth of a healthy baby. Some women may choose not to do genetic testing as this may cause anxiety during the pregnancy. Some women choose genetic testing for reassurance or for planning purposes. How accurate are the screening tests? It’s important to remember screening tests will never be 100 percent diagnostic. Each screening has a detection rate for different conditions as well as false positive and false negative rates. A normal screening result can be reassuring and makes the likelihood of those conditions in the pregnancy low. An abnormal screening is NOT a diagnosis and requires further investigation which may or may not involve diagnostic testing if a woman chooses. What are the risks of the more invasive genetic tests? There is a risk for pregnancy loss of about 1:300 to 1:500 procedures with various genetic tests. Women who choose a diagnostic testing procedure can weigh the benefits of diagnostic results with the possible risks of the procedures and would benefit from seeing a genetic counselor. To find a genetic counselor or for more information on genetic testing click here. The Baby Your Baby program provides many resources for all pregnant women and new moms in Utah. There is also expert advice from the Utah Department of Health and Intermountain Healthcare that air each week on KUTV 2News.
14:06
July 12, 2019
Postpartum anxiety and OCD
Anxiety and obsessive-compulsive disorders are fairly common during pregnancy and postpartum. 1 n 7 women have mood disorders. The disorders often begin during pregnancy, but may not be recognized until the postpartum period. Holly Menino sits down with psychiatrist Kelly Irons, MD, from the Intermountain Avenues Women's Center, on this episode of the Baby Your Baby Podcast. Together, they discuss the signs and treatments of mood disorders.  Why might women be susceptible to this during this time? Drastic hormone shifts occur during pregnancy and postpartum in the body and can affect the brain If you have a history of past behavioral health symptoms Life stressors: medical complications for mom or baby, job change, death of a loved one, moving, etc. Who is at risk? History or family history of behavioral health issues Traumatic labor and delivery Medical complications Isolation or lack of support from family and friends What are the signs of postpartum anxiety? Worry more than normal about the newborn (reasonable dose of worry is healthy) Terrified of hurting the baby Become irrational Panic attacks Can’t fall asleep or stay asleep Shortness of breath Heart palpitations Numbness in fingers Nausea, feeling faint Can’t think straight Duration of these feelings can be minutes or up to an hour. It is important to seek treatment, since anxiety can prevent proper bonding. What are the signs of postpartum OCD? Intrusive thought become prevalent and occur often Taking action to avoid intrusive thoughts Checking things over and over (checking that locks are locked, bath water is not too hot, avoiding picking up dangerous tools) A wrong, terrible thought it OCD, not psychosis. Psychosis is when thought and emotions are so impaired that contact is lost with external reality. Irrational thoughts become something you see yourself actually doing. Untreated anxiety or OCD combined with lack of sleep can lead to psychosis. Talk to your OB/Gyn if you have these symptoms and believe you need help. They can refer you to a behavioral health provider. The Baby Your Baby program provides many resources for all pregnant women and new moms in Utah. There is also expert advice from the Utah Department of Health and Intermountain Healthcare that air each week on KUTV 2News.
16:26
July 5, 2019
Nutrition during pregnancy
During pregnancy it is important to eat healthy foods for both you and the baby. Eating a variety of all of the food groups will help you to consume the nutrients that you need for you and your baby to stay healthy. Holly Menino sits down with Danielle Conlon, a Registered Dietitian Nutritionist with Utah State WIC Program, on this episode of the Baby Your Baby podcast. Together, they discuss nutrition during pregnancy, weight gain guidelines, and tips for preparing to breastfeed.  Prenatal Vitamins: Once you become pregnant, your doctor will prescribe a prenatal vitamin for you. The reason why it is important to take a prenatal vitamin during pregnancy is because nutrient needs increase during pregnancy, and prenatal vitamins will help you to meet those increased nutrient needs. Two of the nutrients that prenatal vitamins contain and that are critical during pregnancy are folic acid and iron. Folic acid helps to prevent birth defects, and iron helps your baby grow and develop. Which Foods to Eat: During pregnancy, eating a variety of all of the food groups will help you to consume the nutrients that you need for you and your baby to stay healthy. General recommendations for each food group include:  Eat whole grains such as whole wheat bread, whole wheat pasta, and brown rice.  Eat a variety of fruits and vegetables each day. These can include fresh, canned, or frozen fruits and vegetables. When buying canned fruits and vegetables, look for “low-sodium” and “no-added sugar” or “canned in water” labels on the cans. These are healthier choices than canned fruits and vegetables that contain high levels of sodium and sugar.  Eat 3 servings of dairy foods each day. Dairy foods have calcium, which is essential to make sure that yours and your baby’s bones are strong. Dairy products include milk, cheese, and yogurt. If you aren’t able to have dairy products, soy milk is a great source of protein and calcium that is dairy free. You can also talk to your doctor about if you should start a calcium supplement.  Eat healthy fats from oils such as avocados, olive or canola oil, or nuts and seeds.  Eat a variety of lean protein foods such as poultry, fish, eggs, beans/lentils, PB, and nuts or seeds. A common question about protein is if fish is safe to eat during pregnancy. Fish is safe during pregnancy as long as the fish doesn’t have high levels of mercury and it is cooked all the way through. During pregnancy, avoid raw fish such as sashimi or sushi that has raw fish, and fish with high mercury content such as tilefish, swordfish, king mackerel, or shark. Foods to avoid during pregnancy: meats, poultry, and fish that aren’t cooked well-done unpasteurized or “raw” milk and juice raw or runny eggs raw sprouts deli meats and hotdogs unless they are cooked until they are steaming or reach a temperature of 165 F soft cheeses such as feta, brie, or queso fresco  The Baby Your Baby program provides many resources for all pregnant women and new moms in Utah. There is also expert advice from the Utah Department of Health and Intermountain Healthcare that air each week on KUTV 2News. 
13:50
June 28, 2019
What to bring to the hospital when you go into labor
During your third trimester, it is time to start thinking about what to bring to the hospital when you go into labor. There are some essentials that mom and dad need to pack ahead of time, but the hospital will also provide you with some things. Holly Menino sits down with Nurse Diana Jensen from Intermountain Medical Center in this week’s Baby Your Baby podcast. They discuss what you should bring, what you should leave at home and what the baby will need.  What you should bring to the hospital: Nightgown (front-opening styles are easier for breast-feeding) Bathrobe Slippers Bras (nursing style if you plan to breast-feed your baby) Cosmetics and toiletries Pillow (hospital has pillows, but some patients prefer to bring their own) Journal, Thank You cards, writing paper, and pen Phone, camera, film or memory card, extra batteries, and chargers Clothes for you and your baby to wear home. For your baby, we suggest you bring a shirt, gown, hat, receiving blanket, and a heavier blanket (depending on the weather.) For you, clothes that fit in mid-pregnancy are usually best. Pacifiers – some babies don’t like the ones from the hospital and it’s always good to have extras Burp Cloths Birthing Plan Car Seat - this has to be installed in the care and checked to make sure the baby is in right before you leave. Make sure you’re current on your immunizations Choose a primary care provider for your baby What you shouldn't bring: Any personal valuables, such as, jewelry, credit cards, or cash. Intermountain hospitals provide: Diapers, wipes, nasal aspirators, onesies The Baby Your Baby program provides many resources for all pregnant women and new moms in Utah. There is also expert advice from the Utah Department of Health and Intermountain Healthcare that air each week on KUTV 2News. 
10:59
June 21, 2019
Taking medications during pregnancy
Moms may feel like they shouldn’t take medications during pregnancy to protect the baby  but, the illness or condition may be more harmful for the baby than the medication. Toughing out an illness usually isn’t better for baby. Holly Menino sits down with Al Romeo, a registered nurse with the Utah Department of Health’s MotherToBaby/Pregnancy Risk Line program on this episode of the Baby Your Baby Podcast. Together they discuss the risks and benefits of taking certain medications and vitamins.  *Correction: Carbamazepine use in pregnancy may have an increased risk of approximately 1% for neural tube defects (spina bifida). Ondansetron (Zofran) use in pregnancy is not associated with an increased risk of neural tube defects (spina bifida). *   There is always a chance for a baby to have a birth defect since the background chance for a major birth defect for all healthy pregnancies is between 3% to 5%. When we look at the research studies, we expect to see some birth defects in each study. We are looking to see if the rate of birth defects is higher than that background risk and we are looking for the same pattern across the studies.    Sometimes the condition is worse than the medication. Talk to your doctor to weigh the risks and benefits especially when it comes to fever, depression and diabetes. Some vaccines do more to protect mom while other vaccines do more to protect baby. We’ll talk about 3 common vaccines. The influenza vaccine helps protect mom from the flu virus. Having the flu during pregnancy increases the chance that mom will have difficulty breathing and adults can die from complications of the flu. The varicella, or chicken pox, vaccine is one that helps protect baby. Getting the chicken pox vaccine before pregnancy helps mom avoid chicken pox during pregnancy which can lead to scarring in the fetus, limb defects, eye defects, and other complications. The tDap vaccine, tetnaus, diptheria, and pertussis, helps protect baby. Getting the Tdap vaccine late in pregnancy gives a boost of immunity just before baby is born in case baby gets exposed to whooping cough, which can be deadly for baby. Listen to our podcast about immunizations here. Protecting baby sometimes means that mom has to take care of her own health so that those illnesses and chronic conditions don’t harm the baby. It’s a complex balance that may require different decisions for different situations based on mom’s medical condition. If moms or providers have concerns or questions about a particular medication or the situation, they can contact  MotherToBaby.utah.gov. The Baby Your Baby program provides many resources for all pregnant women and new moms in Utah. There is also expert advice from the Utah Department of Health and Intermountain Healthcare that air each week on KUTV 2News. 
31:21
June 14, 2019
Summer safety for kids
It’s summer — and a great time for families to spend fun days in the sun! Just remember to use extra caution with kids around water and cars to prevent tragedy — especially as we transition to summer and our schedules change. Holly Menino sits down with Jessica Strong, Community Health Manager at Intermountain Primary Children's Hospital, in this week's Baby Your Baby Podcast. They discuss three of the most dangerous ways kids can be injured during the summer and give tips on how to avoid a tragedy.  Water Safety In Utah, drowning is the second leading cause of death for children under age 14. Teach your children to swim and always supervise them around water. Use extra caution and care to supervise children near lakes, rivers and streams.   Water at any depth can be hazardous.    Prevent Heatstroke: Never Leave A Child Alone in a Vehicle About 40 children across the country die each year after being left in a hot vehicle. Of these fatalities, 87 percent are children ages 3 years and younger.  Never leave your child alone in a vehicle – even for a few minutes. A child’s body temperature can increase 3-5 times faster than an adult’s.  Keep a visual reminder that a child is with you. Place a stuffed animal or diaper bag in the seat next to you Place something you will need when you arrive at your destination in the back seat, like a cell phone or purse Order your free Baby Safety Snap at PrimaryChildrens.org/safetysnap. If you see a child left alone in a car, contact the police or call 911. Spot the Tot During warm weather months, Utah children are at increased risk for being accidentally run over by a vehicle in a driveway or parking lot, most often by a parent or caregiver.  Prevent injury by doing these three things: Walk completely around the car before getting in to drive Eliminate distractions (put phone away, turn off music) Roll down windows and listen before backing up    Additional Information & Resources: -Visit primarychildren’s.org/safety for more tips on how to keep kids safe this summer. -Primary Children’s “Hold On To Dear Life” Water Safety PSA: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2vuSAzkBkwk&list=PL84577120D5FE83BE&index=20 -Child Backovers: National Data can be found here https://www.kidsandcars.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/backover-19-map.pdf -Kids and Cars safety information: https://www.kidsandcars.org/ The Baby Your Baby program provides many resources for all pregnant women and new moms in Utah. There is also expert advice from the Utah Department of Health and Intermountain Healthcare that air each week on KUTV 2News. 
13:13
June 7, 2019
Importance of baby teeth & mom's oral health
The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services reports that dental decay is the most prevalent infectious disease in our nation's children. By the age of three, 5-10% of U.S. children have oral health issues; and by the age of five, about 60% of kids will have had at least one cavity. Children with oral health issues are more likely to experience oral pain, miss school, and perform poorly academically.  In this week's episode of the Baby Your Baby Podcast, Holly Menino heads up to Intermountain Primary Children's Hospital to talk with Dr. Hans Reinemer, DMD, Residency Program Director for Pediatric Dentistry. They discuss the importance of baby teeth and explain why mom's oral health is extremely important, not just for her own teeth, but to the health of her child's mouth as well.  Download & Subscribe on Apple Podcasts Want to listen on another platform? Click here. The Baby Your Baby program provides many resources for all pregnant women and new moms in Utah. There is also expert advice from the Utah Department of Health and Intermountain Healthcare that air each week on KUTV 2News.
13:39
May 31, 2019
Autism spectrum disorder
Autism spectrum disorder (ASD), is complex condition that refers to a person who has challenges with social skills, repetitive behaviors, and communication — both verbal and nonverbal. According to the Centers for Disease Control, autism affects an estimated 1 in 59 children in the United States. Signs of autism usually appear by 2-3 years of age, however some indicators can diagnose autism even earlier. For people with autism, research shows intervention is key to positive outcomes later in life.  In this week's Baby Your Baby Podcast, Holly Menino sits down with Colin Kingsbury, the Autism Systems Development Program Manager at the Utah Department of Health, and Dr. Amanda Bakian, Principal Investigator of the CDC's Autism and Developmental Disabilities Program in Utah. Together they discuss what parents need to know about autism spectrum disorder.  Resources: Utah Department of Health Medical Home Portal Utah Parent Center Autism Council of Utah  The Baby Your Baby program provides many resources for all pregnant women and new moms in Utah. There is also expert advice from the Utah Department of Health and Intermountain Healthcare that air each week on KUTV 2News.
22:28
May 24, 2019
Down syndrome — "Our Sweet Gwendolyn"
It wasn't what they ordered, but an extra chromosome is what they got. For Jessica and Josh Egan, the news that their baby had Down Syndrome was difficult to receive. However, they now see this change in their order as an upgrade — as described in their birth announcement.  In this week’s Baby Your Baby Podcast episode, Holly Menino sits down with Jessica and Josh Egan to talk about their journey to becoming parents.  They talk about the emotional roller coaster they went through during IVF, pregnancy, genetic testing, discovering that Baby Gwen had an extra chromosome, and what it was like when they're birth announcement went viral.  You can follow Baby Gwen and the Egans on Instagram or Facebook.  The Baby Your Baby program provides many resources for all pregnant women and new moms in Utah. There is also expert advice from the Utah Department of Health and Intermountain Healthcare that air each week on KUTV 2News. 
24:09
May 17, 2019
Anesthesia & kids
It can be scary as both a parent and a kid if your child needs to have surgery. Many parents have questions about their child undergoing anesthesia. It can also be hard to describe and prepare your child for the experience.  In this week's episode of the Baby Your Baby Podcast, Holly Menino heads up to Intermountain Primary Children's Hospital to talk with Dr. Erin Hinich, a pediatric anesthesiologist. Together they discuss what parents need to know about anesthesia and kids and how to help prepare your little one if they need surgery.  The Baby Your Baby program provides many resources for all pregnant women and new moms in Utah. There is also expert advice from the Utah Department of Health and Intermountain Healthcare that air each week on KUTV 2News. 
20:46
May 10, 2019
Postpartum depression — take care of yourself, think SNOWBALL
Welcoming a new baby into your family is one of the most joyous experiences life has to offer, but it can also be one of the most stressful. Many new moms struggle with the baby blues after giving birth, and one in seven moms will suffer from postpartum depression.  Holly Menino sits down with Intermountain Medical Center's Diana Jensen, RN in this week's episode of the Baby Your Baby podcast to talk about Postpartum Depression and how new and expecting moms can manage their mental health by using the acronym SNOWBALL.  Take Care of Yourself – think SNOWBALL Remember how to take care of yourself after birth by implementing SNOWBALL. S is for Sleep – Make sure you’re getting enough rest. When you’re tired you aren’t thinking clearly and your mood may suffer. N is for Nutrition – Eating food that’s good for you will help you recover and is especially important if you’re breastfeeding. O is for Omega 3 Fatty Acids – Fish oils have been proven to reduce anxiety and depression in new moms. W is for Walking – Exercise will improve your mood and help your body recover from giving birth. B is for Baby Breaks – Take some time away from your baby. It can help you feel more like yourself again. A is for Adult Time – Spending time with other adults your partner or your friends will help you maintain important relationships. L is for Liquids – Try to drink at least two quarts of water daily. L is for Laughter – Remember to laugh and give yourself a break. Life with a new baby requires a sense of humor. If you or someone you know is experiencing postpartum depression, don’t wait until it’s an emergency!  The Baby Your Baby program provides many resources for all pregnant women and new moms in Utah. There is also expert advice from the Utah Department of Health and Intermountain Healthcare that air each week on KUTV 2News.
12:58
May 3, 2019
How vaccines help achieve community immunity
In the year 2000, measles was nearly eradicated in the United States according to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC). Since then, measles outbreaks have been popping up all over the country despite a vaccine being available.   For this week's Baby Your Baby Podcast, Holly Menino talks with Rich Lakin, the Utah Department of Health's Immunization Program Manager, about why vaccines are so important to achieve community immunity against vaccine preventable diseases.  What can happen if a large number of people in a community aren’t vaccinated or choose not to vaccinate against preventable diseases like measles? Community or herd immunity is a form of protection from a disease that occurs when a large percentage of the population has become immune to it, most often through vaccination. If a high enough number of people are vaccinated against vaccine preventable diseases, such as measles, this helps protect individuals who may not be able to receive a vaccine because of immunocompromised conditions. This means people who have a compromised immune system – for example, someone who has had an organ transplant or is receiving radiation or chemotherapy for cancer - can still be protected and have less chances of suffering from these diseases. Some vaccine preventable diseases – such as measles - are so contagious that if one person has it, 90% of the people close to that person who are not immune to it will also become infected. This is what can happen during a measles outbreak. Infected people can spread measles to others from four days before, through four days after the rash appears. People who have been vaccinated can still get measles, but there is only a small chance of this happening. Only about 3% of people who receive two doses of the measles vaccine will get measles if they come in contact with someone who has the virus. If a person is fully vaccinated, and does come down with measles, they are more likely to have a mild case of the illness. So why do people who are vaccinated and come in contact with an infected person still run the risk of getting measles? There is still a possibility because everyone’s uptake of a vaccine is different. One individual may only have a response rate of 70% when receiving the vaccine, and another person could have a response rate of 90%. If the person with a response rate of 70% is exposed, you could say that their chance is 30% higher of getting the disease than the person whose vaccine response rate is 90%. This does not mean the vaccine didn’t work. Another consideration affecting the how much protection a vaccine will provide is storage and handling of the vaccine. If the vaccine is compromised because it wasn’t stored at the proper temperature or there were temperature changes during transportation, it could make it less effective. The infectious nature of vaccine preventable diseases like measles makes it easy to spread in our communities if we are not properly vaccinated. That’s why we recommend everyone healthy enough to receive the vaccine get the full two doses of the MMR vaccine. Not only will this protect you from getting sick, but it will help protect your family and friends, neighbors, classmates, and coworkers. The Baby Your Baby program provides many resources for all pregnant women and new moms in Utah. There is also expert advice from the Utah Department of Health and Intermountain Healthcare that air each week on KUTV 2News. 
16:12
April 26, 2019
Giving medicine to young kids
Is your child sick? If so, they might need some medicine. However, as a parent, it can sometimes be tricky to make sure they’re not getting too much or too little. In this week’s Baby Your Baby Podcast episode, Holly Menino heads up to Intermountain Primary Children’s Hospital to talk with Bevan Jensen, PharmD. Together they go through what parents need to know about giving medicine to young children. ----------- When giving medicine to kids, getting the dose right can be a challenge. Jensen has a few tips to make it a little bit easier for parents.   1. Avoid kitchen spoons  Spoons you would use to eat food are not a standard size. Instead, it’s best to use an oral syringe to keep your child safe and ensure they’re getting the right amount. If the medicine came with a dosing cup, then that is also appropriate.  2.  Bottle stoppers Bottle stoppers can make using an oral syringe much easier. To use…just stick the syringe into the stopper, flip the bottle upside-down, and then draw out the prescribed dose of medicine.  3. Read the label carefully  4. Keep medication away from kids  Lock up medicine and keep it up high when storing. Make sure all medicine has a safety cap — safety caps are not child-proof but are child-resistant.  5. Don’t mix medications If your child has to take more than one medication — for example an antibiotic and something for pain — have a conversation with your pharmacist. Ask about whether you can give the medications at the same time or if they need to be spaced out. Talk about whether they should or should not have their medicine with food as well as proper spacing between doses.  6. Cough medicine is not recommended for young kids There are risks to using cough medicine in children under the age of six, according to the FDA. For babies who are OVER the age of one, a spoonful of honey can help soothe the urge to cough.   If you have any questions about medicine as it relates to kids, talk to your pharmacist. They are an incredible resources and are happy to answer any questions you have.  If you accidentally give your child too much medicine, give the Utah Poison Control Center (UPCC) a call. They are available 24/7 at the number 1-800-222-1222.    The Baby Your Baby program provides many resources for all pregnant women and new moms in Utah. There is also expert advice from the Utah Department of Health and Intermountain Healthcare that air each week on KUTV 2News.
15:31
April 19, 2019
What to do before pregnancy & after becoming pregnant
In this week's episode of the Baby Your Baby Podcast, Holly Menino sits down with Nurse Dani from Intermountain Moms to talk about what a woman needs to do before pregnancy and what to do after finding out she's pregnant.  What a woman needs to do before pregnancy:  The Centers for Disease Control has challenged women to make a PACT with themselves to do what it takes to be as healthy as possible before getting pregnant:  P-Planning Ahead • Take a prenatal vitamin. Neural tube defects like spina bifida can result from not having enough folic acid in your system during the first couple of weeks following conception (before you even know you’re pregnant).  A—Avoiding Harmful Substances • Avoid alcohol, tobacco products, illicit street drugs, and ask your doctor before taking over-the-counter and prescription medications as well as herbal supplements. • Avoid exposure to radiation, toxic chemicals, and sexually transmitted infections.  C—Choose a Healthy Lifestyle • Talk with your doctor before you get pregnant. Schedule a preconception appointment to have your blood pressure, thyroid, blood sugar, weight, and overall health checked. Exercise and eat a healthy diet  T—Talk with Your Healthcare Provider • It’s important to be educated about risks that apply to everyone and risks that apply specifically to you. Risks specific to you will depend on your history: preterm labor, history of c/sections, history of preeclampsia, advanced age, obesity, etc. • Your provider will talk about immunizations you should get during pregnancy such as the flu shot and a Tdap booster shot.  What a woman needs to do after finding out she's pregnant:  That moment when you see a positive pregnancy test is quite possibly one of the most exciting moments women might experience. But after you see that, you may or may not know what to do next. Nurse Dani says women should — Take A STEP.  Take a prenatal vitamin • Make sure that you're taking a prenatal vitamin each day—one that has at least 400 micrograms of folic acid in it—to prevent spina bifida.  Avoid alcohol — there is no safe amount to consume while pregnant • Drinking alcohol during pregnancy can cause lifelong physical, behavioral, and intellectual disabilities. Drinking alcohol during pregnancy can cause miscarriage, stillbirth, and a range of lifelong physical, behavioral, and intellectual disabilities. These disabilities are known as fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASDs).  Schedule your first prenatal appointment • Your first prenatal appointment should happen by the 13th week of pregnancy, and you should plan on having at least 13 appointments over the course of the pregnancy.  Think twice about all medications • Talk with your doctor before taking prescription, over-the-counter, or herbal medications. They'll decide what's okay for pregnancy.  Exercise Pick a Provider • Make sure they're covered by your insurance, their location is convenient and not too far from home, find out what hospital you'd like to deliver at and pick a provider that has privileges there, think about the dynamics of group coverage. The Baby Your Baby program provides many resources for all pregnant women and new moms in Utah. There is also expert advice from the Utah Department of Health and Intermountain Healthcare that air each week on KUTV 2News.
20:05
April 12, 2019
What is Baby Your Baby?
Baby Your Baby is a program that focuses on making sure expecting mothers get recommended prenatal care. From financial help to preparing for pregnancy, Baby Your Baby helps guide new parents through the pregnancy process, birth, as well as the first few years of being a parent.  In this first episode of the Baby Your Baby Podcast, Holly Menino talks with Marie Nagata from the Utah Department of Health about the history of the Baby Your Baby program, resources available to new and expecting moms, as well as financial help available for low income women.  What is Baby Your Baby? Baby Your Baby is a program at the Utah Department of Health to help low income women receive prenatal care early on in their pregnancy. Baby Your Baby pays for doctor’s visits until a woman can get on Medicaid. Every woman should see her doctor as soon as she knows she’s pregnant. The program does not want anyone to wait to see a doctor, while she is waiting on paperwork to go through. Thirteen Weeks and Thirteen Visits: All pregnant women should have their first doctor’s appointment by their 13th week of pregnancy and visit their doctor at least 13 times throughout their pregnancy. Most first time moms are good about going to their doctor throughout their pregnancy. The problem most often seen with women not getting the prenatal care they need, usually comes with moms who are having their 2nd, 3rd or 4th baby. Sometimes women think that because their other pregnancies were fine, this one will be the same. Every pregnancy, and every baby, are different. It is important that with every pregnancy, a woman sees her doctor before the 13th week of pregnancy, and at least 13 times throughout her pregnancy. Testing for things like Gestational Diabetes and other health problems that often occur during pregnancy is important to the health of your baby. Using Gestational Diabetes as an example, we see many women who haven’t had Gestational Diabetes during previous pregnancies, who get it during their 3rd or 4th pregnancy. Gestational Diabetes can have severe health effects on both mother and baby, so it’s important to see your doctor and make sure you are getting the right tests. This is just one example of something that could show up in one pregnancy and not have occurred in another. That is why it is so important to make sure you are seeing your doctor 13 times during your pregnancy. Getting signed up for Baby Your Baby: Getting signed up for Baby Your Baby is easy. You can call 1-800-826-9662 or apply online.  Resources: Even if you don’t qualify for financial help through the Baby Your Baby program, there are many resources for all pregnant women and new moms in Utah. The Baby Your Baby website contains resources with information from before you get pregnant, until your baby is 5 years old. There is also expert advice from the Utah Department of Health and Intermountain Healthcare that air each week on KUTV 2News.
08:20
April 5, 2019
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