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Bad Ideas about Writing

Bad Ideas about Writing

By Kyle Stedman
Bad Ideas about Writing is an open-access book edited by Cheryl E. Ball and Drew M. Loewe that counters major myths about writing instruction. Written for a general audience, the collection offers opinionated, research-based statements intended to spark debate and to offer a better way of teaching writing. The podcast is unaffiliated with the editors or authors and read by Dr. Kyle Stedman from Rockford University. All donations and ad revenue support the NAACP Legal Defense & Educational Fund and the Computers and Writing Graduate Research Network.
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A Final Reflective Episode
I (@kstedman) finished reading Bad Ideas about Writing. What's left to say? A lot, apparently. This final reflective episode is not found in the book; instead, it records some of the genesis of this podcast project, some details about how I made it, lots of random thoughts about scholarly audiobooks, and fewer thanks than I should have included. It's not required listening; think of it as the director's commentary. The transcript is available in this Google Doc.
30:39
May 05, 2022
63: Anyone Can Teach Writing, by Seth Kahn
Kyle Stedman (@kstedman) reads the bad idea "Anyone Can Teach Writing," by Seth Kahn. It's a chapter first published in Bad Ideas about Writing, which was edited by Cheryl E. Ball (@s2ceball) and Drew M. Loewe (@drewloewe). Don't miss the joke: the author of the chapter is disagreeing with the bad idea stated in the chapter's title. Keywords: academic labor, adjunct, contingent, non-tenure-track faculty, writing program administration/administrators, writing studies Seth Kahn is an English professor at West Chester University of Pennsylvania. He researches and writes about academic labor, especially adjunct labor equity. He also serves on the board of the New Faculty Majority Foundation and has co-chaired labor/contingent faculty committees in several professional organizations. (2017 bio) As always, the theme music is "Parade" by nctrnm, and both the book and podcast are licensed by a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International license. The full book was published by the West Virginia University Libraries and Digital Publishing Institute; find it online for free at https://textbooks.lib.wvu.edu/badideas. All ad revenue will be split between the NAACP Legal Defense & Educational Fund and the Computers and Writing Graduate Research Network.
16:23
April 22, 2022
62: Anyone Can Teach an Online Writing Course, by Beth L. Hewett
Kyle Stedman (@kstedman) reads the bad idea "Anyone Can Teach an Online Writing Course," by Beth L. Hewett. It's a chapter first published in Bad Ideas about Writing, which was edited by Cheryl E. Ball (@s2ceball) and Drew M. Loewe (@drewloewe). Don't miss the joke: the author of the chapter is disagreeing with the bad idea stated in the chapter's title. Keywords: online learning, online writing instruction, OWI, reading online, reading to learn, writing feedback, writing online, writing process Beth L. Hewett is an expert in online literacy instruction, the founding president of the Global Society for Online Literacy Educators, and the owner of Defend and Publish, an adult writing-coaching business. She is the author of numerous books, articles, and book chapters regarding writing in a digital era. Her most recent books include Teaching Writing in the Twenty-First Century and Administering Writing Programs in the Twenty-First Century, both from MLA Press. (2020 bio) As always, the theme music is "Parade" by nctrnm, and both the book and podcast are licensed by a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International license. The full book was published by the West Virginia University Libraries and Digital Publishing Institute; find it online for free at https://textbooks.lib.wvu.edu/badideas. All ad revenue will be split between the NAACP Legal Defense & Educational Fund and the Computers and Writing Graduate Research Network.
18:04
April 08, 2022
61: Face-to-Face Courses Are Superior to Online Courses, by Tiffany Bourelle and Andy Bourelle
Kyle Stedman (@kstedman) reads the bad idea "Face-to-Face Courses Are Superior to Online Courses" by Tiffany Bourelle and Andy Bourelle (@AndrewBourelle). It's a chapter first published in Bad Ideas about Writing, which was edited by Cheryl E. Ball (@s2ceball) and Drew M. Loewe (@drewloewe). Don't miss the joke: the author of the chapter is disagreeing with the bad idea stated in the chapter's title. Keywords: asynchronous methods, face-to-face instruction (f2f), MOOCs, multimodal composition, online writing instruction (OWI), synchronous methods Tiffany Bourelle is an associate professor of English at the University of New Mexico, where she teaches classes in online and multimodal pedagogies and administers eComp, the department's first-year online writing program. She is the coauthor of the books Teaching Writing in the 21st Century and Administering Writing Programs in the 21st Century, as well as co-editor of the anthology Women's Professional Lives in Rhetoric and Composition: Choice, Chance, and Serendipity. Her scholarly articles have been published in Computers and Composition, Kairos, Technical Communication Quarterly, WPA: Writing Program Administration, and other journals and anthologies. (2022 bio) Andrew Bourelle is an associate professor of English at the University of New Mexico, where he teaches classes in composition, creative writing, professional and technical writing, and rhetoric. He is the author of the novels 48 Hours to Kill and Heavy Metal. His scholarly articles have appeared in Communication Design Quarterly, Composition Forum, Journal of Business and Technical Communication, Journal of Teaching Writing, and other publications. (2022 bio) As always, the theme music is "Parade" by nctrnm, and both the book and podcast are licensed by a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International license. The full book was published by the West Virginia University Libraries and Digital Publishing Institute; find it online for free at https://textbooks.lib.wvu.edu/badideas. All ad revenue will be split between the NAACP Legal Defense & Educational Fund and the Computers and Writing Graduate Research Network.
15:01
April 01, 2022
60: Secondary-School English Teachers Should Only Be Taught Literature, by Elizabethada A. Wright
Kyle Stedman (@kstedman) reads the bad idea "Secondary-School English Teachers Should Only Be Taught Literature" by Elizabethada A. Wright. It's a chapter first published in Bad Ideas about Writing, which was edited by Cheryl E. Ball (@s2ceball) and Drew M. Loewe (@drewloewe). Don't miss the joke: the author of the chapter is disagreeing with the bad idea stated in the chapter's title. Keywords: secondary English education programs, rhetoric, AP Central, writing pedagogy, first-year writing Professor at University of Minnesota Duluth, Elizabethada A. Wright teaches in the Department of English, Linguistics, and Writing Studies and is a member of the faculty at the University of Minnesota Twin Cities’ Literacy and Rhetorical Studies Program. She is co-editor and contributor to Catholic Women’s Rhetoric in the United States: Ethos, the Patriarchy, and Feminist Resistance. She has published in Rhetoric Society Quarterly, Rhetoric Review, College English Association Critic, Studies in the Literary Imagination, as well as in a number of other journals and books. (2022 bio) As always, the theme music is "Parade" by nctrnm, and both the book and podcast are licensed by a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International license. The full book was published by the West Virginia University Libraries and Digital Publishing Institute; find it online for free at https://textbooks.lib.wvu.edu/badideas. All ad revenue will be split between the NAACP Legal Defense & Educational Fund and the Computers and Writing Graduate Research Network.
19:14
March 25, 2022
59: Dual-Enrollment Writing Classes Should Always Be Pursued, by Caroline Wilkinson
Kyle Stedman (@kstedman) reads the bad idea "Dual-Enrollment Writing Classes Should Always Be Pursued" by Caroline Wilkinson (@wilkicg). It's a chapter first published in Bad Ideas about Writing, which was edited by Cheryl E. Ball (@s2ceball) and Drew M. Loewe (@drewloewe). Don't miss the joke: the author of the chapter is disagreeing with the bad idea stated in the chapter's title. Keywords: college-level writing, composition/rhetoric, dual enrollment, writing studies, writing-program administration Caroline Wilkinson is an associate professor of English at New Jersey City University. She writes about dual-enrollment writing courses and the relationship between high schools and colleges. She also writes about the portrayals of what college-level writing might mean. (2020 bio) As always, the theme music is "Parade" by nctrnm, and both the book and podcast are licensed by a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International license. The full book was published by the West Virginia University Libraries and Digital Publishing Institute; find it online for free at https://textbooks.lib.wvu.edu/badideas. All ad revenue will be split between the NAACP Legal Defense & Educational Fund and the Computers and Writing Graduate Research Network.
16:44
March 18, 2022
58: You're Going to Need This for College, by Andrew Hollinger
Andrew Hollinger (@ashollinger) reads his chapter "You're Going to Need This for College." (Don't miss the joke: the author of the chapter is disagreeing with the bad idea stated in the chapter's title.) It's a chapter from Bad Ideas about Writing, which was edited by Cheryl E. Ball (@s2ceball) and Drew M. Loewe (@drewloewe). Kyle Stedman (@kstedman) produces the show and will be back as narrator next week. Chapter keywords: FYC/first-year composition, high school to college transition, threshold concepts, writing pedagogy Andrew Hollinger is coordinator of First Year Writing at the University of Texas Rio Grande Valley. He is a recipient of the University of Texas System’s Regents Outstanding Teaching Award. His work focuses on first year writing and curriculum, WPA work and definitions, as well as materiality, publics and circulation, and genre. In addition to his teaching, scholarship, and published work, he is interested in maker rhetorics and is a practicing bookbinder and linocut artist. (2020 bio) As always, the theme music is "Parade" by nctrnm, and both the book and podcast are licensed by a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International license. The full book was published by the West Virginia University Libraries and Digital Publishing Institute; find it online for free at https://textbooks.lib.wvu.edu/badideas. All ad revenue will be split between the NAACP Legal Defense & Educational Fund and the Computers and Writing Graduate Research Network.
13:01
March 11, 2022
57: Digital Natives and Digital Immigrants, by Phill Michael Alexander
Kyle Stedman (@kstedman) reads the bad idea "Digital Natives and Digital Immigrants" by Phill Michael Alexander. It's a chapter first published in Bad Ideas about Writing, which was edited by Cheryl E. Ball (@s2ceball) and Drew M. Loewe (@drewloewe).  Keywords: digital literacy, digital native, technoliteracy, tech savvy, prosumer Phill Alexander is an assistant professor in the Games Program at Miami University and serves as the co-director of their varsity esports program. His most recent book, Esports for Dummies, is available now. His research deals with race, communication, collaboration and identity formation in digital spaces, particularly video games. More about Phill can be found at phillalexander.com. (2020 bio) As always, the theme music is "Parade" by nctrnm, and both the book and podcast are licensed by a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International license. The full book was published by the West Virginia University Libraries and Digital Publishing Institute; find it online for free at https://textbooks.lib.wvu.edu/badideas. All ad revenue will be split between the NAACP Legal Defense & Educational Fund and the Computers and Writing Graduate Research Network.
14:54
March 04, 2022
56: The More Digital Technology, The Better, by Genesea M. Carter & Aurora Matzke
Kyle Stedman (@kstedman) reads the bad idea "The More Digital Technology, The Better," by Genesea M. Carter (@GeneseaC) and Aurora Matzke. It's a chapter first published in Bad Ideas about Writing, which was edited by Cheryl E. Ball (@s2ceball) and Drew M. Loewe (@drewloewe). Don't miss the joke: the author of the chapter is disagreeing with the bad idea stated in the chapter's title. Keywords: cognition, digital literacy, digital writing, multimodal writing, technostress Genesea M. Carter is associate director of composition and assistant professor of writing, rhetoric, and digital literacy at Colorado State University and co-editor of Class in the Composition Classroom: Pedagogy and the Working Class. Aurora Matzke is senior associate provost at Azusa Pacific University. As members of the iGeneration who teach and have taught at laptop-heavy campuses, they enjoy researching and teaching how to use technology in the classroom effectively and mindfully. Because of the importance placed on technology in society and on their campuses (and their love for their iPhones), they have first-hand experience with how technology can interfere with daily life and learning. As such, Genesea and Aurora are always looking for ways to get some tech-balance in their classrooms and after hours. Follow Genesea on Twitter @GeneseaC or visit her website at geneseacarter.com. (2022 bio) As always, the theme music is "Parade" by nctrnm, and both the book and podcast are licensed by a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International license. The full book was published by the West Virginia University Libraries and Digital Publishing Institute; find it online for free at https://textbooks.lib.wvu.edu/badideas. All ad revenue will be split between the NAACP Legal Defense & Educational Fund and the Computers and Writing Graduate Research Network. Oh, and sorry for the lousy audio quality this week. I had to record on campus because of a busy schedule, and after I found the quietest room I could, I recorded with a winter coat draped over the mic and my head—but hey-oh, that didn't help so much. Sorry.
13:52
February 25, 2022
55: Gamification Makes Writing Fun, by Joshua Daniel
Kyle Stedman (@kstedman) reads the bad idea "Gamification Makes Writing Fun," by Joshua Daniel (@FoxyJoshyD). It's a chapter first published in Bad Ideas about Writing, which was edited by Cheryl E. Ball (@s2ceball) and Drew M. Loewe (@drewloewe). Don't miss the joke: the author of the chapter is disagreeing with the bad idea stated in the chapter's title. Keywords: avatar, design, gamification, gaming, ludic, play, procedural rhetoric Joshua Daniel (previously published under Daniel-Wariya) is an assistant professor of rhetoric and professional writing at Oklahoma State University, where he also serves as associate director of First-Year Composition. His research interests involve the intersections of new media, computer games, and play, especially as they relate to the teaching of writing. He has published research about the ways people interpret and express both themselves and the world through the act of playing. He can be reached—and welcomes questions about his work—through his Twitter handle @FoxyJoshyD. (Slightly adjusted 2017 bio) As always, the theme music is "Parade" by nctrnm, and both the book and podcast are licensed by a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International license. The full book was published by the West Virginia University Libraries and Digital Publishing Institute; find it online for free at https://textbooks.lib.wvu.edu/badideas. All ad revenue will be split between the NAACP Legal Defense & Educational Fund and the Computers and Writing Graduate Research Network.
15:13
February 18, 2022
54: Texting Ruins Literacy Skills, by Christopher Justice
Kyle Stedman (@kstedman) reads the bad idea "Texting Ruins Literacy Skills," by Christopher Justice. It's a chapter first published in Bad Ideas about Writing, which was edited by Cheryl E. Ball (@s2ceball) and Drew M. Loewe (@drewloewe). Don't miss the joke: the author of the chapter is disagreeing with the bad idea stated in the chapter's title. Keywords: colloquial language, digital literacy, digital rhetoric, linguistics, nonstandard language, orthography, standard language, texting Dr. Christopher Justice is a writer, professor, independent scholar, and conservationist working in the Baltimore metropolitan region, where he has also taught at various local universities including Loyola University, Stevenson University, the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, and University of Baltimore. His scholarship focuses on writing theory and non-traditional writing systems such as texting and different forms of animal communication. His writing has appeared in numerous publications and presses. For more information about his work, please visit http://christopherjustice.weebly.com. (2020 bio) As always, the theme music is "Parade" by nctrnm, and both the book and podcast are licensed by a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International license. The full book was published by the West Virginia University Libraries and Digital Publishing Institute; find it online for free at https://textbooks.lib.wvu.edu/badideas. All ad revenue will be split between the NAACP Legal Defense & Educational Fund and the Computers and Writing Graduate Research Network.
19:46
February 11, 2022
53: Texting Ruins Students' Grammar Skills, by Scott Warnock
Kyle Stedman (@kstedman) reads the bad idea "Texting Ruins Students' Grammar Skills," by Scott Warnock. It's a chapter first published in Bad Ideas about Writing, which was edited by Cheryl E. Ball (@s2ceball) and Drew M. Loewe (@drewloewe). Don't miss the joke: the author of the chapter is disagreeing with the bad idea stated in the chapter's title. Keywords: computers and composition, correctness, digital writing, error, grammar, linguistics, texting Dr. Scott Warnock is a Professor of English and Associate Dean of Undergraduate Education in the College of Arts & Sciences at Drexel University. In his 18 years at Drexel, he has taught courses in various modalities and contexts, including onsite, hybrid, and online and ranging from first-year writing to the senior literature seminar to a graduate course. In 2020, he won Drexel’s Christian R. and Mary F. Lindback Foundation Award for Distinguished Teaching. Dr. Warnock is the author or co-author of five books and numerous chapters and journal articles about online writing instruction, computers and composition, and educational technology. He served as President of the Global Society of Online Literacy Educators from 2018 to 2020 and Co-Chair of the Conference on College Composition and Communication Committee for Effective Practices in Online Writing Instruction from 2011 to 2016. He has maintained the blog Online Writing Teacher since 2005. (2022 bio) As always, the theme music is "Parade" by nctrnm, and both the book and podcast are licensed by a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International license. The full book was published by the West Virginia University Libraries and Digital Publishing Institute; find it online for free at https://textbooks.lib.wvu.edu/badideas. All ad revenue will be split between the NAACP Legal Defense & Educational Fund and the Computers and Writing Graduate Research Network.
20:58
February 04, 2022
52: SAT Scores Are Useful for Placing Students in Writing Courses, by Kristen di Gennaro
Kyle Stedman (@kstedman) reads the bad idea "SAT Scores Are Useful for Placing Students in Writing Courses," by Kristen di Gennaro. It's a chapter first published in Bad Ideas about Writing, which was edited by Cheryl E. Ball (@s2ceball) and Drew M. Loewe (@drewloewe). Don't miss the joke: the author of the chapter is disagreeing with the bad idea stated in the chapter's title. Keywords: criterion-referenced tests, norm-referenced tests, placement testing, SAT, test use and misuse, validity, writing assessment Kristen di Gennaro is an associate professor of English and the director of composition at Pace University's main campus in New York City, where she teaches undergraduate courses in composition and linguistics. She has published on a variety of topics including writing assessment and pedagogy, microaggressions, and catcalls versus compliments. (2020 bio) As always, the theme music is "Parade" by nctrnm, and both the book and podcast are licensed by a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International license. The full book was published by the West Virginia University Libraries and Digital Publishing Institute; find it online for free at https://textbooks.lib.wvu.edu/badideas. All ad revenue will be split between the NAACP Legal Defense & Educational Fund and the Computers and Writing Graduate Research Network.
13:38
January 28, 2022
51: Plagiarism Detection Services Are Money Well Spent, by Stephanie Vie
Kyle Stedman (@kstedman) reads the bad idea "Plagiarism Detection Services Are Money Well Spent," by Stephanie Vie (@digirhet). It's a chapter first published in Bad Ideas about Writing, which was edited by Cheryl E. Ball (@s2ceball) and Drew M. Loewe (@drewloewe). Don't miss the joke: the author of the chapter is disagreeing with the bad idea stated in the chapter's title. Keywords: Blackboard, Creative Commons, plagiarism, SafeAssign, Turnitin Stephanie Vie is Associate Dean of the Outreach College and Professor of English at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa. She is the co-editor of Social Writing/Social Media: Publics, Presentations, and Pedagogies, and her scholarship has been published in numerous journals like Computers and Composition, Technical Communication Quarterly, Kairos, and First Monday. She is the 2016 recipient of the Charles Moran Award for Distinguished Contributions to the Field and the 2018 winner of the 7C Committee Technology Innovator Award. She tweets at @digirhet. (2020 bio) As always, the theme music is "Parade" by nctrnm, and both the book and podcast are licensed by a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International license. The full book was published by the West Virginia University Libraries and Digital Publishing Institute; find it online for free at https://textbooks.lib.wvu.edu/badideas. All ad revenue will be split between the NAACP Legal Defense & Educational Fund and the Computers and Writing Graduate Research Network.
19:21
January 21, 2022
50: Machines Can Evaluate Writing Well, by Chris M. Anson & Les Perelman
Kyle Stedman (@kstedman) reads the bad idea "Machines Can Evaluate Writing Well," by Chris M. Anson and Les Perelman. It's a chapter first published in Bad Ideas about Writing, which was edited by Cheryl E. Ball (@s2ceball) and Drew M. Loewe (@drewloewe). Don't miss the joke: the author of the chapter is disagreeing with the bad idea stated in the chapter's title. Keywords: essay grading, high-stakes writing tests, machine scoring, standardized tests, writing assessment Chris Anson is Distinguished University Professor and director of the Campus Writing and Speaking Program at North Carolina State University, where he works with faculty across the curriculum to improve the way that writing is integrated into all disciplines. For almost four decades, he has studied, taught, and written about writing and learning to write, especially at the high school and college levels. He is past chair of the Conference on College Composition and Communication and past president of the Council of Writing Program Administrators. He has studied and written about writing and computer technology and is a strong advocate of increased attention to digital modes of communication in instruction, but his research does not support the use of computers to score the evaluation of high-stakes writing tests. (2017 bio) Les Perelman recently retired as director of Writing Across the Curriculum in the department of Comparative Media Studies/Writing at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where he has also served as an associate dean in the Office of the Dean of Undergraduate Education. He is currently a research affiliate at MIT. He is a member of the executive committee of the Conference on College Composition and Communication and co-chairs that organization’s Committee on Assessment. Under a grant from Microsoft, Dr. Perelman developed an online evaluation system for writing that allows student access to readings and time to plan, draft, and revise essays for a variety of assessment contexts. Perelman has become a well-known critic of certain standardized writing tests and especially the use of computers to evaluate writing. (2017 bio) As always, the theme music is "Parade" by nctrnm, and both the book and podcast are licensed by a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International license. The full book was published by the West Virginia University Libraries and Digital Publishing Institute; find it online for free at https://textbooks.lib.wvu.edu/badideas. All ad revenue will be split between the NAACP Legal Defense & Educational Fund and the Computers and Writing Graduate Research Network.
23:38
January 14, 2022
49: Student Writing Must be Graded by the Teacher, by Christopher R. Friend
Christopher R. Friend (@chris_friend) reads his chapter "Student Writing Must be Graded by the Teacher." (Don't miss the joke: the author of the chapter is disagreeing with the bad idea stated in the chapter's title.) It's a chapter from Bad Ideas about Writing, which was edited by Cheryl E. Ball (@s2ceball) and Drew M. Loewe (@drewloewe). Kyle Stedman (@kstedman) produces the show and will be back as narrator next week. Chapter keywords: open peer review, peer review, rhetoric and civic engagement, student writing self-assessment, writing community engagement Chris Friend has been teaching writing classes since 2000, from middle schoolers to collegiate seniors, teens to septuagenarians, in-person, online, and everything in-between. He also teaches faculty to use critical pedagogy in digital spaces and advocates for extreme student agency. As assistant professor of English in new media at Kean University, Chris helps students engage their communities through a variety of digital projects. As director of Hybrid Pedagogy, Chris works with authors and editors in a double-open peer-review process that he believes brings out the best in authors and writing alike. He tweets about these and other topics from @chris_friend. (2021 bio) As always, the theme music is "Parade" by nctrnm, and both the book and podcast are licensed by a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International license. The full book was published by the West Virginia University Libraries and Digital Publishing Institute; find it online for free at https://textbooks.lib.wvu.edu/badideas. All ad revenue will be split between the NAACP Legal Defense & Educational Fund and the Computers and Writing Graduate Research Network. (And yes, you heard Kyle say at the end that it's the end of the first week of class. That's how long ago he recorded that introduction. Oh well! Getting back on schedule feels good!)
14:24
January 07, 2022
Interlude 2: More Episodes Soon!
TRANSCRIPT (read by Kyle Stedman, with no music or effects or anything): Oh, hey, what's up, remember me? This is Kyle Stedman, host of the Bad Ideas about Writing podcast, and wow, it's been a while, right? This is a friendly in-between episode to let you know what's up. The short answer is that I've been busy and that the rest of the episodes are coming soon. I mean, you probably get it: as I record this, it's December 2021, the pandemic is still raging, and teaching this last fall felt, in some ways, harder than ever. So my original thoughts of, "Oh, I'll get to that episode soon" eventually faded into "I'll get to that episode once I'm out of survival mode?" So here I am, nearly four months after the last completed episode was posted, finally rocking and rolling and planning for the future. How about that! I do feel bad if you were relying on this podcast-slash-audiobook in a time-sensitive context like a class, but otherwise, I'm trying pretty hard not to feel too bad about the delay, because after all we all need a little grace these days. So: look for new episodes this January (or this December if I get really into it), and just don't pay too much attention to the weather updates at the end of each episode, since a couple of these were initially recorded quite a while back. Numerically, the book will be done when I record chapter 63, and chapters 1-48 are out now, on all your podcast apps. That means what, 15 more episodes? 3 or 4 months' worth? Sounds like fun, right? No big deal! And after that, that'll be it, with maybe one wrap-up reflective episode from me, or maybe not. But I'm NOT planning to keep the podcast going hardcore in some new reimagined way after I finish reading the book. If anything, I'll just find another book to read! As always, feel free to reach out: you can find my email if you search Kyle Stedman Rockford University, and I'm on Twitter @kstedman, where I'm probably posting something about Christmas movie soundtracks or Nancy Drew or how awesome my students are. See you soon—I mean, hear you soon. I mean, you'll hear me soon . . . this is complicated, avoiding visual-based metaphors, right? How about this: peace to you and your loved ones.
02:18
December 13, 2021
48: When Responding to Student Writing, More is Better, by Muriel Harris
Kyle Stedman (@kstedman) reads the bad idea "When Responding to Student Writing, More is Better," by Muriel Harris. It's a chapter first published in Bad Ideas about Writing, which was edited by Cheryl E. Ball (@s2ceball) and Drew M. Loewe (@drewloewe). Don't miss the joke: the author of the chapter is disagreeing with the bad idea stated in the chapter's title. Keywords: evaluation, feedback, grading, response, writing center Muriel Harris, professor emerita of English at Purdue University, initiated and directed the Purdue Writing Lab where she learned a great deal from students she met in hundreds of tutorials, including which strategies for grammatical rules might work and which needed to be tossed out. Working with graduate student tutors, she initiated a website with instructional handouts on writing, the Purdue OWL (Online Writing Lab). Most of her professional writing has focused on writing centers and individualized instruction in writing. She authored Teaching One-to-One: The Writing Conference, co-authored two textbooks on writing, and is Editor-in-Chief of WLN: A Journal of Writing Center Scholarship. However, she and her husband consider their finest accomplishment in life to be their children and grandchildren. (2020 bio) As always, the theme music is "Parade" by nctrnm, and both the book and podcast are licensed by a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International license. The full book was published by the West Virginia University Libraries and Digital Publishing Institute; find it online for free at https://textbooks.lib.wvu.edu/badideas. All ad revenue will be split between the NAACP Legal Defense & Educational Fund and the Computers and Writing Graduate Research Network.
15:03
August 20, 2021
47: Rubrics Oversimplify the Writing Process, by Crystal Sands
Kyle Stedman (@kstedman) reads the bad idea "Rubrics Oversimplify the Writing Process," by Crystal Sands (@CrystalDSands). It's a chapter first published in Bad Ideas about Writing, which was edited by Cheryl E. Ball (@s2ceball) and Drew M. Loewe (@drewloewe). Don't miss the joke: the author of the chapter is disagreeing with the bad idea stated in the chapter's title. Keywords: critical thinking, faculty course loads, rubrics, self-evaluation, writing assessment Crystal Sands earned her Ph.D. in rhetoric from Texas Woman’s University in 2005. She has nearly 20 years of experience teaching writing at the college level. Having worked in the field as a full-time adjunct, a writing program director, and a director of an award-winning online writing lab, Sands has a wide variety of experiences working with students, teaching, and assessing writing. She is now an adjunct writing instructor at Walden University and Southern New Hampshire University, a full-time mom, and a hobby farmer with her husband, Ron. Her twitter handle is @CrystalDSands. (2017 bio) As always, the theme music is "Parade" by nctrnm, and both the book and podcast are licensed by a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International license. The full book was published by the West Virginia University Libraries and Digital Publishing Institute; find it online for free at https://textbooks.lib.wvu.edu/badideas. All ad revenue will be split between the NAACP Legal Defense & Educational Fund and the Computers and Writing Graduate Research Network.
11:31
August 13, 2021
46: Rubrics Save Time and Make Grading Criteria Visible, by Anna Leahy
Kyle Stedman (@kstedman) reads the bad idea "Rubrics Save Time and Make Grading Criteria Visible," by Anna Leahy (@AMLeahy). It's the chapter she wrote in Bad Ideas about Writing, which was edited by Cheryl E. Ball (@s2ceball) and Drew M. Loewe (@drewloewe). Don't miss the joke: the author of the chapter is disagreeing with the bad idea stated in the chapter's title. Keywords: assessment, formative feedback, revision, rubric, summative feedback Anna Leahy is the author of the nonfiction book Tumor and the poetry collections Aperture and Constituents of Matter. Her essays and poetry have appeared at The Atlantic, Crab Orchard Review, Fifth Wednesday Journal, The Southern Review, The Pinch, and elsewhere, and her essays have won top awards from the Los Angeles Review, Ninth Letter, and Dogwood. She is the editor of Power and Identity in the Creative Writing Classroom and What We Talk about When We Talk about Creative Writing and has contributed to a variety of other books and journals about teaching. She directs the MFA in Creative Writing program at Chapman University, where she edits the international Tab Journal and curates the Tabula Poetica reading series. See more at www.amleahy.com. (2020 bio) As always, the theme music is "Parade" by nctrnm, and both the book and podcast are licensed by a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International license. The full book was published by the West Virginia University Libraries and Digital Publishing Institute; find it online for free at https://textbooks.lib.wvu.edu/badideas. All ad revenue will be split between the NAACP Legal Defense & Educational Fund and the Computers and Writing Graduate Research Network.
14:47
August 06, 2021
45: Grading Has Always Made Writing Better, by Mitchell R. James
Kyle Stedman (@kstedman) reads the bad idea "Grading Has Always Made Writing Better," by Mitchell R. James (@mrjames5527). It's the chapter she wrote in Bad Ideas about Writing, which was edited by Cheryl E. Ball (@s2ceball) and Drew M. Loewe (@drewloewe). Don't miss the joke: the author of the chapter is disagreeing with the bad idea stated in the chapter's title. Keywords: assessment, formative assessment, grading, grading alternatives, summative assessment Mitchell R. James is a Professor of Composition and Literature at Lakeland Community College in Kirtland, OH and is the Managing Editor at Great Lakes Review. You can find Mitch’s latest fiction at Flash Fiction Magazine and Scissors and Spackle, poetry at Peauxdunque Review and Southern Florida Poetry Journal, and scholarship at Journal of Creative Writing Studies. Find more of his work at mitchjamesauthor.com, and follow him on Twitter @mrjames5527 and Facebook @perhupsous. (2020 bio) As always, the theme music is "Parade" by nctrnm, and both the book and podcast are licensed by a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International license. The full book was published by the West Virginia University Libraries and Digital Publishing Institute; find it online for free at https://textbooks.lib.wvu.edu/badideas. All ad revenue will be split between the NAACP Legal Defense & Educational Fund and the Computers and Writing Graduate Research Network.
10:43
July 30, 2021
44: Plagiarism Deserves to be Punished, by Jennifer A. Mott-Smith
Kyle Stedman (@kstedman) reads the bad idea "Plagiarism Deserves to be Punished," by Jennifer A. Mott-Smith. It's the chapter she wrote in Bad Ideas about Writing, which was edited by Cheryl E. Ball (@s2ceball) and Drew M. Loewe (@drewloewe). Don't miss the joke: the author of the chapter is disagreeing with the bad idea stated in the chapter's title. Keywords: borrowing, citation, patchwriting, plagiarism, referencing, source use, textual Jennifer A. Mott-Smith, associate professor of English, has been teaching college writing for over twenty years, so she knows firsthand how scary and confusing students may find plagiarism to be. Working mostly with multilingual writers, she has had the benefit of exposure to other traditions of source use and textual construction. As a scholar, she has been researching plagiarism since 2009. Her book, Teaching Effective Source Use: Classroom Approaches That Work, co-written with Zuzana Tomaš and Ilka Kostka, is being published by University of Michigan Press in 2017. (2017 bio) As always, the theme music is "Parade" by nctrnm, and both the book and podcast are licensed by a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International license. The full book was published by the West Virginia University Libraries and Digital Publishing Institute; find it online for free at https://textbooks.lib.wvu.edu/badideas. All ad revenue will be split between the NAACP Legal Defense & Educational Fund and the Computers and Writing Graduate Research Network.
17:36
July 23, 2021
43: Citing Sources is a Basic Skill Learned Early On, by Susanmarie Harrington
Susanmarie Harrington reads the bad idea "Citing Sources is a Basic Skill Learned Early On." It's the chapter she wrote in Bad Ideas about Writing, which was edited by Cheryl E. Ball (@s2ceball) and Drew M. Loewe (@drewloewe); the podcast is produced by Kyle Stedman (@kstedman). Don't miss the joke: the author of the chapter is disagreeing with the bad idea stated in the chapter's title. Keywords: citation, plagiarism, researched writing, working with sources, writing development Susanmarie Harrington is professor of English and director of Writing in the Disciplines at the University of Vermont. She has taught researched writing for over twenty years, teaching at all levels from first-year students to graduate students. She has collaborated with faculty across the disciplines in workshops and teaching, and she has taught in both urban and rural institutions. Most recently, she has worked with librarians, faculty in the disciplines, and the writing center to promote attention to department-based learning outcomes for students. She has co-edited and co-authored many different types of publications, working with quantitative and qualitative methods. Her variety of writing experiences and working relationships with faculty in many departments inspired her interest in citation and research development. (2017 bio) As always, the theme music is "Parade" by nctrnm, and both the book and podcast are licensed by a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International license. The full book was published by the West Virginia University Libraries and Digital Publishing Institute; find it online for free at https://textbooks.lib.wvu.edu/badideas. All ad revenue will be split between the NAACP Legal Defense & Educational Fund and the Computers and Writing Graduate Research Network.
11:59
July 16, 2021
42: The Traditional Research Paper is Best, by Alexandria Lockett
Kyle Stedman (@kstedman) reads the bad idea "The Traditional Research Paper is Best," by Alexandria Lockett (@MzJaneNova). It's a chapter from Bad Ideas about Writing, which was edited by Cheryl E. Ball (@s2ceball) and Drew M. Loewe (@drewloewe). Don't miss the joke: the author of the chapter is disagreeing with the bad idea stated in the chapter's title. Keywords: big data, Boolean logic, data deluge, traditional research paper, web 2.0 Dr. Alexandria L. Lockett is an Assistant Professor of English at Spelman College. She is lead author of Race, Rhetoric, and Research Methods (WAC Clearinghouse, April 2021) and co-editor of  Learning From the Lived Experiences of Graduate Student Writers (Utah State University Press, May 2020). She also publishes about the technological politics of race, surveillance, and access in articles that appeared in Composition Studies, Enculturation, and Praxis, as well as chapters featured in Wikipedia @ 20: An Incomplete Revolution (MIT Press), Humans at Work in the Digital Age (Routledge), Out in the Center (Utah State University Press), and Black Perspectives on Writing Program Administration: From the Margins to the Center (SWR Press). An extended biography is available via her portfolio at: www.alexandrialockett.com. (2021 bio) As always, the theme music is "Parade" by nctrnm, and both the book and podcast are licensed by a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International license. The full book was published by the West Virginia University Libraries and Digital Publishing Institute; find it online for free at https://textbooks.lib.wvu.edu/badideas. All ad revenue will be split between the NAACP Legal Defense & Educational Fund and the Computers and Writing Graduate Research Network.
16:52
June 18, 2021
41: Research Starts with a Thesis Statement, by Emily A. Wierszewski
Kyle Stedman (@kstedman) reads the bad idea "Research Starts with a Thesis Statement," by Emily A. Wierszewski (@ewazoo23). It's a chapter from Bad Ideas about Writing, which was edited by Cheryl E. Ball (@s2ceball) and Drew M. Loewe (@drewloewe). Don't miss the joke: the author of the chapter is disagreeing with the bad idea stated in the chapter's title. Keywords: discovery, process, research, thesis, thesis-first research model Emily Wierszewski has been teaching writing for over ten years, most recently at Seton Hill University outside of Pittsburgh, PA. Her graduate work focused on nonfiction writing, including the study of what makes writing persuasive, as well as how people learn to read and write. As a professor, she’s very interested in how her college students understand and have used the research process before coming to her class, including how their preconceptions about the purpose and process of research impact their attitudes toward and proficiency with college-level inquiry. She recently wrote a book chapter about how comics can help students more effectively engage with research in the writing classroom. Her Twitter handle is @ewazoo23. (2017 bio) As always, the theme music is "Parade" by nctrnm, and both the book and podcast are licensed by a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International license. The full book was published by the West Virginia University Libraries and Digital Publishing Institute; find it online for free at https://textbooks.lib.wvu.edu/badideas. All ad revenue will be split between the NAACP Legal Defense & Educational Fund and the Computers and Writing Graduate Research Network.
14:35
June 11, 2021
40: Research Starts with Answers, by Alison C. Witte
Kyle Stedman (@kstedman) reads the bad idea "Research Starts with Answers," by Alison C. Witte (@acwitte82). It's a chapter from Bad Ideas about Writing, which was edited by Cheryl E. Ball (@s2ceball) and Drew M. Loewe (@drewloewe). Don't miss the joke: the author of the chapter is disagreeing with the bad idea stated in the chapter's title. Keywords: argument, claim-based writing, classical argument, data-driven writing, research paper, research writing, rhetoric Alison Witte is the Supplemental Instruction Coordinator at the University of Dayton. She has taught research writing to college students for more than 10 years in courses on research writing, research methods, technical writing, and advanced composition, and she has co-developed curriculum for teaching research writing to international graduate students. Her research interests include student research practices, digital pedagogy, digital pedagogy preparation, and non-classroom writing. Her twitter handle is @acwitte82. (2021 bio) As always, the theme music is "Parade" by nctrnm, and both the book and podcast are licensed by a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International license. The full book was published by the West Virginia University Libraries and Digital Publishing Institute; find it online for free at https://textbooks.lib.wvu.edu/badideas. All ad revenue will be split between the NAACP Legal Defense & Educational Fund and the Computers and Writing Graduate Research Network.
14:31
June 04, 2021
39: The Five-Paragraph Theme Teaches "Beyond the Test," by Bruce Bowles, Jr.
Kyle Stedman (@kstedman) reads the bad idea "The Five-Paragraph Theme Teaches 'Beyond the Test'" by Bruce Bowles, Jr. It's a chapter from Bad Ideas about Writing, which was edited by Cheryl E. Ball (@s2ceball) and Drew M. Loewe (@drewloewe). Don't miss the joke: the author of the chapter is disagreeing with the bad idea stated in the chapter's title. Keywords: assessment washback, curriculum, five-paragraph theme, interrater reliability, localized assessment, portfolio assessment, standardized testing, validity Bruce Bowles Jr. is an Assistant Professor of English and the Director of the University Writing Center at Texas A&M University-Central Texas. His research interests focus on how we evaluate and make judgments across multiple contexts, including writing assessment, writing center administration, and political and public discourse. His work has been published in Composition Studies; Journal of Response to Writing; enculturation: A Journal of Rhetoric, Writing, and Culture; WLN: A Journal of Writing Center Scholarship; and Intraspection: A Journal of Rhetoric, Culture, and Style. (2020 bio) As always, the theme music is "Parade" by nctrnm, and both the book and podcast are licensed by a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International license. The full book was published by the West Virginia University Libraries and Digital Publishing Institute; find it online for free at https://textbooks.lib.wvu.edu/badideas. All ad revenue will be split between the NAACP Legal Defense & Educational Fund and the Computers and Writing Graduate Research Network.
17:40
May 28, 2021
38: The Five-Paragraph Essay Transmits Knowledge, by Susan Naomi Bernstein & Elizabeth Lowry
Kyle Stedman (@kstedman) reads the bad idea "The Five-Paragraph Essay Transmits Knowledge" by Susan Naomi Bernstein and Elizabeth Lowry. It's a chapter from Bad Ideas about Writing, which was edited by Cheryl E. Ball (@s2ceball) and Drew M. Loewe (@drewloewe). Don't miss the joke: the author of the chapter is disagreeing with the bad idea stated in the chapter's title. Keywords: academic writing, banking model of education, five-paragraph essay, problem posing, transition to postsecondary education Susan Naomi Bernstein is an adjunct assistant professor of English at Queens College, City University of New York, and a former co-coordinator of the Stretch Writing Program at Arizona State University–Tempe. Her publications include “Occupy Basic Writing: Pedagogy in the Wake of Austerity” in Nancy Welch and Tony Scott’s collection Composition in the Age of Austerity; "An Unconventional Education: A Letter to Basic Writing Practicum Students” in Journal of Basic Writing 37.1; and "Theory in Practice: Halloween Write-In" co-authored with Ian James, William F. Martin, and Meghan Kelsey in BWe: Basic Writing e-Journal 16.1. She has published four editions of Teaching Developmental Writing with Bedford/St. Martin's and wrote the Bedford Bits blog, Beyond the Basics, from 2011-2019. (2020 bio) Elizabeth Lowry received her Ph.D. in rhetoric and composition from Arizona State University, where she now holds a lecturer position in rhetoric and composition. Her research interests include public spheres, material culture, and 19th-century women’s rhetorics. Her work has been published in Rhetoric Review, Word and Text, and in edited collections. (2017 bio) As always, the theme music is "Parade" by nctrnm, and both the book and podcast are licensed by a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International license. The full book was published by the West Virginia University Libraries and Digital Publishing Institute; find it online for free at https://textbooks.lib.wvu.edu/badideas. All ad revenue will be split between the NAACP Legal Defense & Educational Fund and the Computers and Writing Graduate Research Network.
16:30
May 21, 2021
37: The Five-Paragraph Essay is Rhetorically Sound, by Quentin Vieregge
Kyle Stedman (@kstedman) reads the bad idea "The Five-Paragraph Essay is Rhetorically Sound" by Quentin Vieregge (@Vieregge). It's a chapter from Bad Ideas about Writing, which was edited by Cheryl E. Ball (@s2ceball) and Drew M. Loewe (@drewloewe). Don't miss the joke: the author of the chapter is disagreeing with the bad idea stated in the chapter's title. Keywords: basic writing, current-traditional rhetoric, discursive writing, five-paragraph essay (or theme), prescriptivism Quentin Vieregge is an associate professor of English at UW-Eau Claire--Barron County. He teaches writing, literature, and film classes. He has co-authored two books: Agency in the Age of Peer Production and The United States Constitution in Film: Part of Our National Culture.  And he has published more generally in the fields of rhetoric & composition and popular culture studies. (2020 bio) As always, the theme music is "Parade" by nctrnm, and both the book and podcast are licensed by a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International license. The full book was published by the West Virginia University Libraries and Digital Publishing Institute; find it online for free at https://textbooks.lib.wvu.edu/badideas. All ad revenue will be split between the NAACP Legal Defense & Educational Fund and the Computers and Writing Graduate Research Network.
15:15
May 14, 2021
36: Popular Culture is Only Useful as a Text for Criticism, by Mark D. Pepper
Kyle Stedman (@kstedman) reads the bad idea "Popular Culture is Only Useful as a Text for Criticism" by Mark D. Pepper (@MarkDPepper). It's a chapter from Bad Ideas about Writing, which was edited by Cheryl E. Ball (@s2ceball) and Drew M. Loewe (@drewloewe). Don't miss the joke: the author of the chapter is disagreeing with the bad idea stated in the chapter's title. Keywords: affect, cultural studies, fandom, popular culture, taste studies Mark D. Pepper is an associate professor of English at Utah Valley University where he teaches courses in composition, technical writing, popular culture, and graphic novels. Much of his research deals with how people use and talk about popular culture in their daily lives to create both personal identity and social belonging. His dissertation looked at how the popularity of texts is created and spread in a digital age of blogs, wikis, and social media. His own pop culture fandom started with comic books as a kid and carries on to a Netflix queue full of television series with far too many seasons to ever reasonably catch up on. (2017 bio) As always, the theme music is "Parade" by nctrnm, and both the book and podcast are licensed by a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International license. The full book was published by the West Virginia University Libraries and Digital Publishing Institute; find it online for free at https://textbooks.lib.wvu.edu/badideas. All ad revenue will be split between the NAACP Legal Defense & Educational Fund and the Computers and Writing Graduate Research Network.
19:56
May 07, 2021
35: Popular Culture is Killing Writing, by Bronwyn T. Williams
Kyle Stedman (@kstedman) reads the bad idea "Popular Culture is Killing Writing," by Bronwyn T. Williams (@bronwyntw). It's a chapter from Bad Ideas about Writing, which was edited by Cheryl E. Ball (@s2ceball) and Drew M. Loewe (@drewloewe). Don't miss the joke: the author of the chapter is disagreeing with the bad idea stated in the chapter's title. Also, oops: I thought using a different mic in a different place would sound "good enough." After recording, I realized too late that that's not true. Sorry for the worse-than-usual quality. Keywords: fan communities, genre, participatory culture, popular culture, remix Bronwyn T. Williams is a professor of English and director of the University Writing Center at the University of Louisville. He has taught writing and studied the connections between popular culture and students’ writing and reading practices, both in the U.S. and abroad, for more than 25 years. He is the author of a number of books on the teaching of writing, popular culture, and student identity. Twitter: @bronwyntw. Website: bronwyntwilliams.com. (2017 bio) As always, the theme music is "Parade" by nctrnm, and both the book and podcast are licensed by a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International license. The full book was published by the West Virginia University Libraries and Digital Publishing Institute; find it online for free at https://textbooks.lib.wvu.edu/badideas. All ad revenue will be split between the NAACP Legal Defense & Educational Fund and the Computers and Writing Graduate Research Network.
22:15
April 30, 2021
34: Creative Writing is a Unique Category, by Cydney Alexis
Kyle Stedman (@kstedman) reads the bad idea "Creative Writing is a Unique Category," by Cydney Alexis (@CydneyAlexis). It's a chapter from Bad Ideas about Writing, which was edited by Cheryl E. Ball (@s2ceball) and Drew M. Loewe (@drewloewe). Don't miss the joke: the author of the chapter is disagreeing with the bad idea stated in the chapter's title. Keywords: composition and rhetoric, creative writing, creativity, genre, reading, workplace writing Cydney Alexis is an associate professor of English at Kansas State University, where she teaches courses in composition pedagogy, digital rhetoric, the material culture of writing, literacy studies, professional writing, and writing center theory and practice. Her alma mater is the University of Wisconsin–Madison, where she was assistant director of both the first-year writing and Writing Fellows programs. Her research primarily focuses on the material culture of writing—those material goods, rituals, and practices that support writers in their trade. She is interested in tracing how writers’ adult practices are impacted by their early writing environments. You can find her on Instagram @materiallives and @writinglandscapes and on Twitter at @cydneyalexis. (2020 bio) As always, the theme music is "Parade" by nctrnm, and both the book and podcast are licensed by a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International license. The full book was published by the West Virginia University Libraries and Digital Publishing Institute; find it online for free at https://textbooks.lib.wvu.edu/badideas. All ad revenue will be split between the NAACP Legal Defense & Educational Fund and the Computers and Writing Graduate Research Network.
21:28
April 24, 2021
33: Excellent Academic Writing Must be Serious, by Michael Theune
Kyle Stedman (@kstedman) reads the bad idea "Excellent Academic Writing Must be Serious," by Michael Theune. It's a chapter from Bad Ideas about Writing, which was edited by Cheryl E. Ball (@s2ceball) and Drew M. Loewe (@drewloewe). Don't miss the joke: the author of the chapter is disagreeing with the bad idea stated in the chapter's title. Keywords: academic writing, comedy, composition, humor, writing Michael Theune is the Robert Harrington Professor of English and Writing Program Director at Illinois Wesleyan University in Bloomington, Illinois. (2020 bio) As always, the theme music is "Parade" by nctrnm, and both the book and podcast are licensed by a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International license. The full book was published by the West Virginia University Libraries and Digital Publishing Institute; find it online for free at https://textbooks.lib.wvu.edu/badideas. All ad revenue will be split between the NAACP Legal Defense & Educational Fund and the Computers and Writing Graduate Research Network.
18:13
April 16, 2021
32: Logos is Synonymous with Logic, by Nancy Fox
Nancy Fox reads her chapter exploring the bad idea "Logos is Synonymous with Logic." It's a chapter from Bad Ideas about Writing, which was edited by Cheryl E. Ball (@s2ceball) and Drew M. Loewe (@drewloewe). Don't miss the joke: the author of the chapter is disagreeing with the bad idea stated in the chapter's title. Produced as always by Kyle Stedman (@kstedman). Keywords: logic, logos, persuasive discourse, philosophy, rhetoric, rhetorical theory Nancy Fox is a faculty member in the English Department at the University of West Florida. She earned her Ph.D. in English Language and Rhetoric from the University of Washington, Seattle, and her dissertation is entitled American Athena: A Feminist Sophistic Analysis of the Discourses of Women Servicemembers. She is the recipient of the Andrew R. Hillen Foundation Fellowship. Dr. Fox has published poetry, essays, and a children’s book, as well as work in feminist studies, multimedia, and writing. Her subjects have ranged from analysis of the film The Kids Are All Right and Andy Warhol’s Dream America to a new discovery in the Mouse’s Tale in Alice in Wonderland. She lives on the Gulf Coast with her spouse and two children. (2021 bio) As always, the theme music is "Parade" by nctrnm, and both the book and podcast are licensed by a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International license. The full book was published by the West Virginia University Libraries and Digital Publishing Institute; find it online for free at https://textbooks.lib.wvu.edu/badideas. All ad revenue will be split between the NAACP Legal Defense & Educational Fund and the Computers and Writing Graduate Research Network.
11:40
April 02, 2021
31: Students Should Learn about the Logical Fallacies, by Daniel V. Bommarito
Kyle Stedman (@kstedman) reads the bad idea "Students Should Learn about the Logical Fallacies" by Daniel V. Bommarito (@d_bomm). It's a chapter from Bad Ideas about Writing, which was edited by Cheryl E. Ball (@s2ceball) and Drew M. Loewe (@drewloewe). Don't miss the joke: the author of the chapter is disagreeing with the bad idea stated in the chapter's title. Keywords: argument, invention, logic, reasoning, rhetoric Daniel V. Bommarito is an associate professor at Bowling Green State University, where he directs the doctoral program in Rhetoric and Writing Studies. His research explores composition theory and pedagogy at undergraduate and graduate levels from sociocultural and social cognitive perspectives. (2020 bio) As always, the theme music is "Parade" by nctrnm, and both the book and podcast are licensed by a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International license. The full book was published by the West Virginia University Libraries and Digital Publishing Institute; find it online for free at https://textbooks.lib.wvu.edu/badideas. All ad revenue will be split between the NAACP Legal Defense & Educational Fund and the Computers and Writing Graduate Research Network.
16:11
March 26, 2021
30: Formal Outlines Are Always Useful, by Kristin Milligan
Kyle Stedman (@kstedman) reads the bad idea "Formal Outlines Are Always Useful" by Kristin Milligan. It's a chapter from Bad Ideas about Writing, which was edited by Cheryl E. Ball (@s2ceball) and Drew M. Loewe (@drewloewe). Don't miss the joke: the author of the chapter is disagreeing with the bad idea stated in the chapter's title. Keywords: outlines, post draft outlining, reverse outlining, writing as a process, writing process Kristin Milligan is currently the associate director of the Learning Center at East Central College. In her more than six years of experience as a writing center tutor, Kristin has seen all kinds of outlines, messy and neat, informal and formal, and she has observed the effects of writing process choices on student texts. Kristin holds a Master’s degree from Texas State University in San Marcos, TX, and a teaching degree from Webster University in St. Louis, MO. She embraces multiple modes of brainstorming and organization as a way to reach diverse writers. (2017 bio) As always, the theme music is "Parade" by nctrnm, and both the book and podcast are licensed by a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International license. The full book was published by the West Virginia University Libraries and Digital Publishing Institute; find it online for free at https://textbooks.lib.wvu.edu/badideas. All ad revenue will be split between the NAACP Legal Defense & Educational Fund and the Computers and Writing Graduate Research Network.
13:10
March 19, 2021
29: Grammar Should be Taught Separately as Rules to Learn, by Muriel Harris
Kyle Stedman (@kstedman) reads the bad idea "Grammar Should be Taught Separately as Rules to Learn" by Muriel Harris (https://cla.purdue.edu/directory/profiles/muriel-mickey-harris.html). It's a chapter from Bad Ideas about Writing, which was edited by Cheryl E. Ball (@s2ceball) and Drew M. Loewe (@drewloewe). Don't miss the joke: the author of the chapter is disagreeing with the bad idea stated in the chapter's title. Keywords: COIK, grammar, grammatical correctness, language arts, literacy, rules of grammar, teaching grammar Muriel Harris, professor emerita of English at Purdue University, initiated and directed the Purdue Writing Lab where she learned a great deal from students she met in hundreds of tutorials, including which strategies for grammatical rules might work and which needed to be tossed out. Working with graduate student tutors, she initiated a website with instructional handouts on writing, the Purdue OWL (Online Writing Lab). Most of her professional writing has focused on writing centers and individualized instruction in writing. She authored Teaching One-to-One: The Writing Conference, co-authored two textbooks on writing, and is Editor-in-Chief of WLN: A Journal of Writing Center Scholarship.  However, she and her husband consider their finest accomplishment in life to be their children and grandchildren. (2020 bio) As always, the theme music is "Parade" by nctrnm, and both the book and podcast are licensed by a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International license. The full book was published by the West Virginia University Libraries and Digital Publishing Institute; find it online for free at https://textbooks.lib.wvu.edu/badideas. All ad revenue will be split between the NAACP Legal Defense & Educational Fund and the Computers and Writing Graduate Research Network.
13:49
March 12, 2021
28: Good Writers Must Know Grammatical Terminology, by Hannah J. Rule
Kyle Stedman (@kstedman) reads the bad idea "Good Writers Must Know Grammatical Terminology" by Hannah J. Rule (https://www.hannahjrule.com/). It's a chapter from Bad Ideas about Writing, which was edited by Cheryl E. Ball (@s2ceball) and Drew M. Loewe (@drewloewe). Don't miss the joke: the author of the chapter is disagreeing with the bad idea stated in the chapter's title. Keywords: grammar instruction, grammar, pedagogical grammar, rhetorical grammar, writing instruction Hannah J. Rule is Associate Professor of Composition and Rhetoric in the Department of English at the University of South Carolina. Her teaching and research focuses on the teaching of writing in postsecondary contexts, composition theory, and disciplinary histories. She is the author of Situating Writing Processes (2019), a new take on the trajectories of the process paradigm in composition studies. Her scholarship also appears in College Composition and Communication, Composition Studies, Composition Forum, as well as edited collections including Best of the Journals in Rhetoric & Composition 2018. (2020 bio) As always, the theme music is "Parade" by nctrnm, and both the book and podcast are licensed by a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International license. The full book was published by the West Virginia University Libraries and Digital Publishing Institute; find it online for free at https://textbooks.lib.wvu.edu/badideas. All ad revenue will be split between the NAACP Legal Defense & Educational Fund and the Computers and Writing Graduate Research Network.
14:34
March 05, 2021
27: Teaching Grammar Improves Writing, by Patricia A. Dunn
Kyle Stedman (@kstedman) reads the bad idea "Teaching Grammar Improves Writing" by Patricia A. Dunn (@PatriciaDunn1). It's a chapter from Bad Ideas about Writing, which was edited by Cheryl E. Ball (@s2ceball) and Drew M. Loewe (@drewloewe). Don't miss the joke: the author of the chapter is disagreeing with the bad idea stated in the chapter's title. Keywords: authentic writing, English language, grammar, rhetoric, usage Patricia A. Dunn (@PatriciaDunn1) is professor of English at Stony Brook University in New York, where she teaches current and future English teachers and writing instructors. She has taught writing in a high school, a two-year college, a private university, and several large state universities. She has presented on topics related to the teaching of writing at numerous national conferences, and she has published several books, articles, and blogs on the teaching of writing, including a 2011 book (co-written with Ken Lindblom), which is a rhetorical analysis of published grammar rants. (2017 bio) As always, the theme music is "Parade" by nctrnm, and both the book and podcast are licensed by a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International license. The full book was published by the West Virginia University Libraries and Digital Publishing Institute; find it online for free at https://textbooks.lib.wvu.edu/badideas. All ad revenue will be split between the NAACP Legal Defense & Educational Fund and the Computers and Writing Graduate Research Network.
16:19
February 26, 2021
26: The Passive Voice Should Be Avoided, by Collin Gifford Brooke
Kyle Stedman (@kstedman) reads the bad idea "The Passive Voice Should Be Avoided" by Collin Gifford Brooke (https://thecollege.syr.edu/people/faculty/brooke-collin-gifford/). It's a chapter from Bad Ideas about Writing, which was edited by Cheryl E. Ball (@s2ceball) and Drew M. Loewe (@drewloewe). Don't miss the joke: the author of the chapter is disagreeing with the bad idea stated in the chapter's title. Keywords: active voice, cohesion, grammar, mechanics, passive voice, sentences Collin Gifford Brooke is an associate professor in the writing program at Syracuse University. He studies the impact of contemporary technology on writing and language. He has taught college level writing for nearly 25 years. (2017 bio) As always, the theme music is "Parade" by nctrnm, and both the book and podcast are licensed by a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International license. The full book was published by the West Virginia University Libraries and Digital Publishing Institute; find it online for free at https://textbooks.lib.wvu.edu/badideas. All ad revenue will be split between the NAACP Legal Defense & Educational Fund and the Computers and Writing Graduate Research Network. Watch me edit a mis-spoken error in this YouTube video: https://youtu.be/cvFy0C8QuGs
14:00
February 19, 2021
25: Never Use "I," by Kimberly N. Parker
Kyle Stedman (@kstedman) reads the bad idea "Never Use 'I'" by Kimberly N. Parker (@drkimpossible). It's a chapter from Bad Ideas about Writing, which was edited by Cheryl E. Ball (@s2ceball) and Drew M. Loewe (@drewloewe). Don't miss the joke: the author of the chapter is disagreeing with the bad idea stated in the chapter's title. Keywords: emerging writers, first-person point of view, writing assumptions, writing instruction, writing voice Kimberly N. Parker teaches high school and college preparatory courses in the Cambridge Public Schools (Massachusetts). Her research interests include English language arts with culturally responsive pedagogy and the teaching and study of African American literature. She is an adjunct instructor at Tufts University and president of the New England Association of Teachers of English. Catch her virtually @drkimpossible. (2017 bio) As always, the theme music is "Parade" by nctrnm, and both the book and podcast are licensed by a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International license. The full book was published by the West Virginia University Libraries and Digital Publishing Institute; find it online for free at https://textbooks.lib.wvu.edu/badideas. All ad revenue will be split between the NAACP Legal Defense & Educational Fund and the Computers and Writing Graduate Research Network.
12:30
February 12, 2021
24: Leave Yourself Out of Your Writing, by R. Joseph Rodríguez
Kyle Stedman (@kstedman) reads the bad idea "Leave Yourself Out of Your Writing" by R. Joseph Rodríguez (@escribescribe). It's a chapter from Bad Ideas about Writing, which was edited by Cheryl E. Ball (@s2ceball) and Drew M. Loewe (@drewloewe). Don't miss the joke: the author of the chapter is disagreeing with the bad idea stated in the chapter's title. R. Joseph Rodríguez is a literacy educator and researcher in the Texas Hill Country. He is the author of Enacting Adolescent Literacies across Communities: Latino/a Scribes and Their Rites (Lexington Books, 2017), Teaching Culturally Sustaining and Inclusive Young Adult Literature: Critical Perspectives and Conversations (Routledge, 2019), and several academic articles and book chapters. Joseph has taught English and Spanish language arts in public schools, community  colleges, and universities across the country. His areas of research include children’s and young  adult literatures, language acquisition, and socially responsible biliteracies. Currently, Joseph is a teacher educator at St. Edward’s University in the Division of  Graduate and Professional Studies in Austin, Texas. He is coeditor of English Journal, a  publication of the National Council of Teachers of English. In addition, Joseph serves as a  consultant in secondary public schools. Joseph enjoys cooking, hiking, kayaking, storytelling, and traveling with the love of his  life and their cantankerous canine, Maxwell. Contact Joseph via Twitter @escribescribe. (2021 bio) As always, the theme music is "Parade" by nctrnm, and both the book and podcast are licensed by a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International license. The full book was published by the West Virginia University Libraries and Digital Publishing Institute; find it online for free at https://textbooks.lib.wvu.edu/badideas. All ad revenue will be split between the NAACP Legal Defense & Educational Fund and the Computers and Writing Graduate Research Network.
11:07
February 05, 2021
23: Writers Must Develop a Strong, Original Voice, by Patrick Thomas
Kyle Stedman (@kstedman) reads the bad idea "Writers Must Develop a Strong, Original Voice" by Patrick Thomas (@patrickwthomas). It's a chapter from Bad Ideas about Writing, which was edited by Cheryl E. Ball (@s2ceball) and Drew M. Loewe (@drewloewe). Don't miss the joke: the author of the chapter is disagreeing with the bad idea stated in the chapter's title. Chapter keywords: audience, authenticity, intertextuality, origins of writing, reading as meaning-making, speech, voice Patrick Thomas is an associate professor of English at the University of Dayton, in Dayton, Ohio, where he teaches courses in composition theory, literacy studies, and professional writing. His is interested in how people write outside of school, new theories of what writing is, and digital culture. His Twitter handle is @patrickwthomas. (2017 bio) As always, the theme music is "Parade" by nctrnm, and both the book and podcast are licensed by a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International license. The full book was published by the West Virginia University Libraries and Digital Publishing Institute; find it online for free at https://textbooks.lib.wvu.edu/badideas. All ad revenue will be split between the NAACP Legal Defense & Educational Fund and the Computers and Writing Graduate Research Network.
13:06
January 29, 2021
22: Good Writers Always Follow My Rules, by Monique Dufour & Jennifer Ahern-Dodson
Kyle Stedman (@kstedman) reads the bad idea "Good Writers Always Follow My Rules" by Monique Dufour (https://moniquedufour.com/) and Jennifer Ahern-Dodson (@jaherndodson). It's a chapter from Bad Ideas about Writing, which was edited by Cheryl E. Ball (@s2ceball) and Drew M. Loewe (@drewloewe). Don't miss the joke: the author of the chapter is disagreeing with the bad idea stated in the chapter's title. Chapter keywords: good/effective writing, prescriptive writing, style, writer’s block, writing process Monique Dufour is an assistant collegiate professor in the history department at Virginia Tech, where she is also director of graduate student professional development in the College of Liberal Arts and Human Sciences. She offers retreats, workshops and consultations for faculty and graduate students about their writing and their teaching, and about how to balance them both. Currently, she is writing a book, Teaching with TIME in Mind: Why It's Hard, Why You Should, and How You Can. To contact her, visit moniquedufour.com. (2021 bio) Jennifer Ahern-Dodson teaches writing, student activism, and women's leadership at Duke University. She also directs the Faculty Write Program and consults with faculty across disciplines on ways to teach and assess writing and make connections between their own writing practices and their teaching. In her research, she studies structures in which writers work and the conditions under which they thrive or struggle, and has been working with student, community, and faculty writers for more than 20 years. She is @jaherndodson on Twitter. (2021 bio) As always, the theme music is "Parade" by nctrnm, and both the book and podcast are licensed by a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International license. The full book was published by the West Virginia University Libraries and Digital Publishing Institute; find it online for free at https://textbooks.lib.wvu.edu/badideas. All ad revenue will be split between the NAACP Legal Defense & Educational Fund and the Computers and Writing Graduate Research Network.
14:46
January 22, 2021
21: Strunk and White Set the Standard, by Laura Lisbeth
Kyle Stedman (@kstedman) reads the bad idea "Strunk and White Set the Standard" by Laura Lisabeth (@lauralhny). It's a chapter from Bad Ideas about Writing, which was edited by Cheryl E. Ball (@s2ceball) and Drew M. Loewe (@drewloewe). Don't miss the joke: the author of the chapter is disagreeing with the bad idea stated in the chapter's title. Chapter keywords: grammar, literacies, Standard English, style, writing handbook Laura Lisabeth is a Lecturer in the Program in Writing and Rhetoric at Stony Brook University (SUNY). Her current research is the racial/political/cultural history of The Elements of Style and other such popular cultural influences on our ideas about English language usage. She is also interested in how anti-racist ways of thinking about academic writing provide counternarratives to Strunk and White style and look toward a more equitable language culture. Her book manuscript is titled Our White National Discourse: The Elements of Style and Twentieth-Century American Literacies. (2020 update to 2017 bio published in the book) As always, the theme music is "Parade" by nctrnm, and both the book and podcast are licensed by a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International license. The full book was published by the West Virginia University Libraries and Digital Publishing Institute; find it online for free at https://textbooks.lib.wvu.edu/badideas. All ad revenue will be split between the NAACP Legal Defense & Educational Fund and the Computers and Writing Graduate Research Network.
12:45
January 15, 2021
20: The More Writing Process, The Better, by Jimmy Butts
Jimmy Butts (@jimmy_butts) reads his chapter "The More Writing Process, The Better." (Don't miss the joke: the author of the chapter is disagreeing with the bad idea stated in the chapter's title.) It's a chapter from Bad Ideas about Writing, which was edited by Cheryl E. Ball (@s2ceball) and Drew M. Loewe (@drewloewe). Kyle Stedman (@kstedman) produces the show and will be back as narrator next week (I MEAN NEXT YEAR, WUUUT.) Chapter keywords: getting things done, post-process, process, recursivity, revision Jimmy Butts teaches writing and the teaching of writing to impressive, young humans. He likes to get them doing wonderfully weird things with words. He immensely enjoys finishing a draft. You can find him on Twitter @jimmy_butts or at http://theyellowrobot.com/. (2017 bio) As always, the theme music is "Parade" by nctrnm, and both the book and podcast are licensed by a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International license. The full book was published by the West Virginia University Libraries and Digital Publishing Institute; find it online for free at https://textbooks.lib.wvu.edu/badideas. All ad revenue will be split between the NAACP Legal Defense & Educational Fund and the Computers and Writing Graduate Research Network.
16:54
December 25, 2020
19: Strong Writing and Writers Don't Need Revision, by Laura Giovanelli
Kyle Stedman (@kstedman) reads the bad idea "Strong Writing and Writers Don't Need Revision" by Laura Giovanelli (@LauraGiovanelli). It's a chapter from Bad Ideas about Writing, which was edited by Cheryl E. Ball (@s2ceball) and Drew M. Loewe (@drewloewe). Don't miss the joke: the author of the chapter is disagreeing with the bad idea stated in the chapter's title. Chapter keywords: ideal reader, revision strategies, revision, writing about writing, writing as process Laura Giovanelli is Associate Teaching Professor and Associate Dean for Learning Spaces at Wake Forest University. Before she earned her MFA in fiction as a journalist writing for daily newspapers. Her personal essays, including one on pushing through writer’s block and writing as a writing teacher, have appeared in The Washington Post. According to her Google Doc revision history, she revised this article 19 times. You can follow her on Twitter @lauragiovanelli. As always, the theme music is "Parade" by nctrnm, and both the book and podcast are licensed by a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International license. The full book was published by the West Virginia University Libraries and Digital Publishing Institute; find it online for free at https://textbooks.lib.wvu.edu/badideas. All ad revenue will be split between the NAACP Legal Defense & Educational Fund and the Computers and Writing Graduate Research Network.
11:60
December 18, 2020
18: Writer's Block Just Happens to People, by Geoffrey V. Carter
Kyle Stedman (@kstedman) reads the bad idea "Writer's Block Just Happens to People" by Geoffrey V. Carter. It's a chapter from Bad Ideas about Writing, which was edited by Cheryl E. Ball (@s2ceball) and Drew M. Loewe (@drewloewe). Don't miss the joke: the author of the chapter is disagreeing with the bad idea stated in the chapter's title. Chapter keywords: blank pages, play of names, puns, writer’s block Geoffrey V. Carter is an associate professor of English at Saginaw Valley State University, where he teaches undergraduate courses in composition. His areas of interest include writer's block, video culture, and the history of pinball. His work has appeared in journals like PRE/TEXT, Kairos, Computers and Composition, and Enculturation. He has also published chapters in Bad Ideas About Writing (2017) and Rhetorical Speculations (2019). (2020 bio) As always, the theme music is "Parade" by nctrnm, and both the book and podcast are licensed by a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International license. The full book was published by the West Virginia University Libraries and Digital Publishing Institute; find it online for free at https://textbooks.lib.wvu.edu/badideas. All ad revenue will be split between the NAACP Legal Defense & Educational Fund and the Computers and Writing Graduate Research Network.
12:59
December 11, 2020
Interlude 1: Taking a Week Off
TRANSCRIPT: Hey, good morning, it's Kyle. After 17 weeks of dropping a new episode of Bad Ideas about Writing every Friday, it felt weird not to, so I wanted to pop in, say hi, and say, "See you next week." At Rockford University, where I teach, it's finals week, so there's a lot to do and not a lot of time to record and edit a full episode. Sorry/not sorry. But since I'm here, let me quickly say a couple things: 1) I'm motivated to read and release these episodes almost entirely because of your enthusiasm. This podcast started as a wild "what if" idea in an email I sent to Cheryl and Drew, the book's editors, and they were so excited that I practically had to keep going. That's a secret about me, if you didn't know: words of affirmation and encouragement mean a lot to me, giving me energy to do things I couldn't otherwise manage. So thanks for your support--it really does mean a lot. 2) If you're wondering, this podcast is purposefully low-engagement, because your encouragement can only give me SO MUCH energy and time. By low-engagement, I mean that there's no social media or email accounts connected to the podcast; there's no website other than the built-in hosting site at anchor.fm; I don't ask for engagement or emails or responses on the show; and there's no merch. That's partly because I'm busy, but partly because all that stuff is kind of beyond the point; my hope here is that teachers and students will listen to these recordings and share them for a long time in whatever contexts they need them--it's a long-term resource / audiobook, not a flashy, "markets itself in a modern way" podcast. That doesn't mean you can't get in touch; I'm on Twitter @kstedman and you can find my email address if you google me. To me, it's nice to keep this thing simple, you know? 3) If you haven't yet, you should really check out the actual free book Bad Ideas about Writing--just google it. If you're teaching writing or considering teaching writing, skim the table of contents and read ahead. I mean, for goodness sake, chapter  62, the next to last chapter, features online writing instruction expert Beth Hewett dismantling the bad idea, "Anyone Can Teach an Online Writing Course." These days, as we drown in this pandemic, we need advice and resources from experts like her more than ever--yet I'm not scheduled to read and share it until well into the second half of 2021. And there's more: tons of other chapters are just as crucial and needed today. So don't wait for me to hand you recordings on a sonic, podcast plate--go read them yourselves. Okay, I'm gonna get back to reading my students' rad work. I'm Kyle Stedman and I live in Rockford, Illinois, where every morning this week I've looked out at the small pond in my backyard, where a small pump is still shooting a mini-waterfall through the sheen of ice floating on the top of the pond, and every morning I think about going out there and taking a video of it and trying to figure out what kind of metaphor the water and the ice is suggesting to me, but it also looks really cold so I just stay inside. Thanks for listening.
02:60
December 04, 2020
17: Official American English is Best, by Steven Alvarez
Kyle Stedman (@kstedman) reads the bad idea "Official American English is Best" by Steven Alvarez (@chastitellez). It's a chapter from Bad Ideas about Writing, which was edited by Cheryl E. Ball (@s2ceball) and Drew M. Loewe (@drewloewe). Don't miss the joke: the author of the chapter is disagreeing with the bad idea stated in the chapter's title. Chapter keywords: English-only myths, immigrant communities, literacy, national language, Official English, plurilingual writing 2017 bio: Steven Alvarez is a writing researcher of English at St. John’s University. He has studied literacy and bilingual learning among Mexican immigrant communities across the country for over a decade. Follow him on Twitter @chastitellez and Instagram @stevenpaulalvarez. As always, the theme music is "Parade" by nctrnm, and both the book and podcast are licensed by a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International license. The full book was published by the West Virginia University Libraries and Digital Publishing Institute; find it online for free at https://textbooks.lib.wvu.edu/badideas. All ad revenue will be split between the NAACP Legal Defense & Educational Fund and the Computers and Writing Graduate Research Network.
16:15
November 27, 2020
16: African American Language is Not Good English, by Jennifer M. Cunningham
Jennifer M. Cunningham (@jenmcunningham) reads her chapter "African American Language is Not Good English." (Don't miss the joke: the author of the chapter is disagreeing with the bad idea stated in the chapter's title.) It's a chapter from Bad Ideas about Writing, which was edited by Cheryl E. Ball (@s2ceball) and Drew M. Loewe (@drewloewe). Kyle Stedman (@kstedman) produces the show and will be back as narrator next week. Chapter keywords: African American Language, African American Vernacular English, Black English, Ebonics, grammar, linguistics, Standard American English, Standard English, Standard Written English Here's Cunningham's 2017 bio from the book: Jennifer M. Cunningham is an associate professor of English at Kent State University at Stark. Her teaching and research center on the themes and connections among digital literacies, African American Language, and online pedagogies. Jennifer has a background in composition, linguistics, and education, earning her B.A. in integrated language arts, her M.A. in composition and linguistics, and her Ph.D. in literacy, rhetoric, and social practice. Among other scholarly activities, she has developed and taught online versions of research writing and first-year composition and is currently researching social presence in online writing classes as well as digital African American Language and Nigerian Pidgin English within digital messages. Her Twitter handle is @jenmcunningham, and her website is https://jencunningham.weebly.com/. Here's a 2020 update: Since publishing her chapter in Bad Ideas, Jennifer is currently the Writing Program Coordinator for Kent State University. She continues to research African American Language and recently submitted an NSF grant with a faculty member in computer science at another university with the hope of continuing her work by applying her methodological experience to a forensics linguistics project. As always, the theme music is "Parade" by nctrnm, and both the book and podcast are licensed by a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International license. The full book was published by the West Virginia University Libraries and Digital Publishing Institute; find it online for free at https://textbooks.lib.wvu.edu/badideas. All ad revenue will be split between the NAACP Legal Defense & Educational Fund and the Computers and Writing Graduate Research Network.
14:12
November 20, 2020
15: There is One Correct Way of Writing and Speaking, by Anjali Pattanayak
Kyle Stedman (@kstedman) reads the bad idea "There is One Correct Way of Writing and Speaking" by Anjali Pattanayak (@ArPattanayak). It's a chapter from Bad Ideas about Writing, which was edited by Cheryl E. Ball (@s2ceball) and Drew M. Loewe (@drewloewe). Don't miss the joke: the author of the chapter is disagreeing with the bad idea stated in the chapter's title. Chapter keywords: African American Vernacular, cultural rhetorics, Ebonics, non-standard dialect, rhetorical genre studies, writing and class Anjali Pattanayak is working towards an Ed.D. degree in educational leadership from Edgewood College. She's also served as the Academic Enrichment program coordinator for the Office of Multicultural Student Affairs at the University of Wisconsin–Platteville, and has run programs that help underrepresented students transition into their first year of college to support retention and matriculation. She has spent over five years doing outreach work with under-represented youth as they transition to college. She has taught both first-year composition and first-year experience classes. You can follow her on Twitter @lalaith_feanaro or @arpattanayak. As always, the theme music is "Parade" by nctrnm, and both the book and podcast are licensed by a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International license. The full book was published by the West Virginia University Libraries and Digital Publishing Institute; find it online for free at https://textbooks.lib.wvu.edu/badideas. All ad revenue will be split between the NAACP Legal Defense & Educational Fund and the Computers and Writing Graduate Research Network.
15:35
November 13, 2020
14: Failure is Not an Option, by Allison D. Carr
Kyle Stedman (@kstedman) reads the bad idea "Failure is Not an Option" by Allison D. Carr (@hors_doeuvre). It's a chapter from Bad Ideas about Writing, which was edited by Cheryl E. Ball (@s2ceball) and Drew M. Loewe (@drewloewe). Don't miss the joke: the author of the chapter is disagreeing with the bad idea stated in the chapter's title. Chapter keywords: basic writers, failure, growth mindset, productive failure, struggle, writing process Allison Carr is an associate professor of rhetoric and Director of Writing Across the Curriculum at Coe College. She is co-editor with Laura Micciche of Failure Pedagogies: Learning and Unlearning What It Means to Fail. Beyond researching the intersection of failure and emotion for her doctoral dissertation, Allison considers herself a failure savant, leading her students by example toward riskier, frightening, and sometimes downright stupid undertakings. She tweets about food, politics, writing, and baseball @hors_doeuvre. As always, the theme music is "Parade" by nctrnm, and both the book and podcast are licensed by a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International license. The full book was published by the West Virginia University Libraries and Digital Publishing Institute; find it online for free at https://textbooks.lib.wvu.edu/badideas. All ad revenue will be split between the NAACP Legal Defense & Educational Fund and the Computers and Writing Graduate Research Network.
16:02
November 06, 2020
13: Some People Are Just Born Good Writers, by Jill Parrott
Jill Parrott reads her chapter "Some People Are Just Born Good Writers." It's a chapter from Bad Ideas about Writing, which was edited by Cheryl E. Ball (@s2ceball) and Drew M. Loewe (@drewloewe). Kyle Stedman (@kstedman) produces the show and will be back as narrator next week. Chapter keywords: authorship, critical reading, literacy, metacognition, writing instruction Jill Parrott works in the Department of English at Eastern Kentucky University, where she is also the coordinator of the first-year writing program and the Quality Enhancement Plan co-director. She teaches all kinds of writing classes, from first-year courses to advanced composition to grammar and modern composition and rhetorical theory. In the past, she has written about copyright law and how our understanding of what an author is affects and is affected by intellectual property laws. She is researching how collaboration between writing instructors, libraries, and writing centers can help improve the way students interact with their own research and transitions from undergraduate writing to writing in graduate school. As always, the theme music is "Parade" by nctrnm, and both the book and podcast are licensed by a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International license. The full book was published by the West Virginia University Libraries and Digital Publishing Institute; find it online for free at https://textbooks.lib.wvu.edu/badideas. All ad revenue will be split between the NAACP Legal Defense & Educational Fund and the Computers and Writing Graduate Research Network.
14:46
October 30, 2020
12: Only Geniuses Can Be Writers, by Dustin Edwards & Enrique Paz
Enrique Paz (@eepaziii) reads a chapter he co-wrote with Dustin Edwards (@edwardsdusty): "Only Geniuses Can be Writers." It's a chapter from Bad Ideas about Writing, which was edited by Cheryl E. Ball (@s2ceball) and Drew M. Loewe (@drewloewe). Kyle Stedman (@kstedman) produces the show and pops in a bit at the beginning and ending of today's episode, but let's be honest: this show is not all about him. Chapter keywords: authorship, collaboration, genius, history of authorship, influence, originality, remix Dustin Edwards is an Assistant Professor of Writing and Rhetoric and Director of Graduate Programs at the University of Central Florida. He researches and teaches in areas of digital writing and rhetoric, professional writing, and material rhetorics. His current research examines the environmental implications of big data and digital infrastructure in our age of environmental crisis. Enrique Paz is an assistant professor of English and director of the writing center at Southern Illinois University. In the writing center and in scholarship, he explores issues around conceptions of writing, WAC/WID, and authorship. His latest research explores how disciplinary writing experiences can change misconceptions around writing. As always, the theme music is "Parade" by nctrnm, and both the book and podcast are licensed by a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International license. The full book was published by the West Virginia University Libraries and Digital Publishing Institute; find it online for free at https://textbooks.lib.wvu.edu/badideas. All ad revenue will be split between the NAACP Legal Defense & Educational Fund and the Computers and Writing Graduate Research Network.
17:10
October 23, 2020
11: You Need My Credentials to be a Writer, by Ronald Clark Brooks
Kyle Stedman (@kstedman) reads the bad idea "You Need My Credentials to be a Writer" by Ronald Clark Brooks (@RhetOrRon). It's a chapter from Bad Ideas about Writing, which was edited by Cheryl E. Ball (@s2ceball) and Drew M. Loewe (@drewloewe). Don't miss the joke: the author of the chapter is disagreeing with the bad idea stated in the chapter's title. Chapter keywords: credentials, empowerment, growth, optimism, process movement, support, writing community Ronald Clark Brooks is an associate professor and chair of the writing studies department at Montclair State University in Montclair, NJ. One of his primary interests is helping students learn to think of themselves as writers. As always, the theme music is "Parade" by nctrnm, and both the book and podcast are licensed by a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International license. The full book was published by the West Virginia University Libraries and Digital Publishing Institute; find it online for free at https://textbooks.lib.wvu.edu/badideas. All ad revenue will be split between the NAACP Legal Defense & Educational Fund and the Computers and Writing Graduate Research Network.
09:27
October 16, 2020
10: Writers are Mythical, Magical, and Damaged, by Teri Holbrook & Melanie Hundley
Kyle Stedman (@kstedman) reads the bad idea "Writers are Mythical, Magical, and Damaged" by Teri Holbrook & Melanie Hundley. It's a chapter from Bad Ideas about Writing, which was edited by Cheryl E. Ball (@s2ceball) and Drew M. Loewe (@drewloewe). Don't miss the joke: the authors of the chapter are disagreeing with the bad idea stated in the chapter's title. Chapter keywords: workshop, writing as a profession, writing as process, writing lives Teri Holbrook, a crime fiction writer turned literacy educator, is an associate professor at Georgia State University where she examines how digital technology and arts-based research affect writing—and vice versa. (2017 bio) Melanie Hundley is a professor at Vanderbilt University where she studies how teachers learn to write digital and multimodal texts. She is a passionate teacher of writing and young adult literature. (2017 bio) As always, the theme music is "Parade" by nctrnm, and both the book and podcast are licensed by a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International license. The full book was published by the West Virginia University Libraries and Digital Publishing Institute; find it online for free at https://textbooks.lib.wvu.edu/badideas. All ad revenue will be split between the NAACP Legal Defense & Educational Fund and the Computers and Writing Graduate Research Network.
19:09
October 09, 2020
9: Reading is Not Essential to Writing Instruction, by Julie Myatt
Kyle Stedman (@kstedman) reads the bad idea "Reading is Not Essential to Writing Instruction" by Julie Myatt. It's a chapter from Bad Ideas about Writing, which was edited by Cheryl E. Ball (@s2ceball) and Drew M. Loewe (@drewloewe). Don't miss the joke: the author of the chapter is disagreeing with the bad idea stated in the chapter's title. Chapter keywords: close reading, metacognition, model texts, reading rhetorically, recursive reading, rhetorical genre studies, standardized testing Julie Myatt is a Professor of English at Middle Tennessee State University, where she teaches undergraduate writing and literature courses and graduate courses in Rhetoric and Composition. Myatt currently serves as Director of MT Engage, MTSU's Quality Enhancement Plan, and has previously served as Co-Director of General Education English and Coordinator of Graduate Teaching Assistants in English. She is the immediate past Co-President of WPA Midsouth, an affiliate of the Council of Writing Program Administrators. Her publications also appear in the edited collections Composing Feminist Interventions and Failure Pedagogies. As always, the theme music is "Parade" by nctrnm, and both the book and podcast are licensed by a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International license. The full book was published by the West Virginia University Libraries and Digital Publishing Institute; find it online for free at https://textbooks.lib.wvu.edu/badideas. All ad revenue will be split between the NAACP Legal Defense & Educational Fund and the Computers and Writing Graduate Research Network.
18:53
October 02, 2020
8: Reading and Writing Are Not Connected, by Ellen C. Carillo
Kyle Stedman (@kstedman) reads the bad idea "Reading and Writing Are Not Connected" by Ellen C. Carillo. It's a chapter from Bad Ideas about Writing, which was edited by Cheryl E. Ball (@s2ceball) and Drew M. Loewe (@drewloewe). Chapter keywords: literacy acquisition, literacy, new literacies, reading pedagogies, reading wars, reading–writing connections Ellen C. Carillo is Professor of English at the University of Connecticut and the writing program administrator at its Waterbury campus. She is the author of Securing a Place for Reading in Composition: The Importance of Teaching for Transfer; Teaching Readers in Post-Truth America; A Writer’s Guide to Mindful Reading; The MLA Guide to Digital Literacy; and the editor of Reading Critically, Writing Well. Ellen has earned grants to conduct research on reading–writing connections in the classroom and regularly presents her findings and scholarship at national conferences. She is also a founding member and co-leader of “The Role of Reading in Composition Studies” special interest group, which meets at the Conference on College Composition and Communication’s annual convention. As always, the theme music is "Parade" by nctrnm, and both the book and podcast are licensed by a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International license. The full book was published by the West Virginia University Libraries and Digital Publishing Institute; find it online for free at https://textbooks.lib.wvu.edu/badideas. All ad revenue will be split between the NAACP Legal Defense & Educational Fund and the Computers and Writing Graduate Research Network.
15:01
September 25, 2020
7: Writing Knowledge Transfers Easily, by Ellen C. Carillo
Kyle Stedman (@kstedman) reads the bad idea "Writing Knowledge Transfers Easily" by Ellen C. Carillo. It's a chapter from Bad Ideas about Writing, which was edited by Cheryl E. Ball (@s2ceball) and Drew M. Loewe (@drewloewe). Chapter keywords: composition studies, metacognition, transfer of learning, vertical curriculum Ellen C. Carillo is Professor of English at the University of Connecticut and the writing program administrator at its Waterbury campus. Her administrative work involves directing the Writing Center, supervising the first-year writing program, and supporting faculty who teach writing-intensive courses across the disciplines. She has written a book, as well as articles and chapters about the importance of teaching for transfer. She incorporates this approach to teaching into the literature and writing courses she teaches. Ellen has earned two grants to explore transfer in different settings and has served as an advisor for graduate students who are completing dissertations on transfer. As always, the theme music is "Parade" by nctrnm, and both the book and podcast are licensed by a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International license. The full book was published by the West Virginia University Libraries and Digital Publishing Institute; find it online for free at https://textbooks.lib.wvu.edu/badideas. All ad revenue will be split between the NAACP Legal Defense & Educational Fund and the Computers and Writing Graduate Research Network.
11:29
September 18, 2020
6: You Can Learn to Write in General, by Elizabeth Wardle
Kyle Stedman (@kstedman) reads the bad idea "You Can Learn to Write in General" by Elizabeth Wardle (@ElizabethWardle), a chapter from Bad Ideas about Writing, which was edited by Cheryl E. Ball (@s2ceball) and Drew M. Loewe (@drewloewe). Chapter keywords: dispositions, genre conventions, genre, literacy, transfer Bio published in 2017: Elizabeth Wardle is Howe Professor of English and Director of the Roger and Joyce Howe Center for Writing Excellence at Miami University (Oxford, OH). She has directed the writing program at the University of Central Florida and the University of Dayton, experiences that have contributed to her ongoing interest in how learners use and transfer prior knowledge about writing, and how courses and programs can best help students learn to write more effectively. She regularly gives talks and workshops around the U.S. on how threshold concepts and knowledge about writing and knowledge transfer can be used to strengthen writing courses and programs. As always, the theme music is "Parade" by nctrnm, and both the book and podcast are licensed by a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International license. The full book was published by the West Virginia University Libraries and Digital Publishing Institute; find it online for free at https://textbooks.lib.wvu.edu/badideas. All ad revenue will be split between the NAACP Legal Defense & Educational Fund and the Computers and Writing Graduate Research Network.
09:43
September 11, 2020
5: First-Year Composition Should Be Skipped, by Paul G. Cook
In a first for this podcast (but not a last), Paul G. Cook (@paulgeecook) reads his own bad idea chapter, "First-Year Composition Should Be Skipped." Seriously, who needs Kyle Stedman (@kstedman) around here anyway (though he butts in as host regardless). Cook's narration is a chapter from Bad Ideas about Writing, which was edited by Cheryl E. Ball (@s2ceball) and Drew M. Loewe (@drewloewe). Chapter keywords: rhetorical listening, contingent labor, deep learning, dual enrollment, ethics, first-year composition, literacy, rhetoric, writing pedagogy Paul Cook is Associate Professor of English in the Department of English and Language Studies at Indiana University Kokomo and Director of Writing for the campus. He also serves as President of Faculty Senate and Reviews Editor for the online journal Across the Disciplines. He teaches courses in writing, rhetoric, digital media, and technical editing. Paul earned a BA from Winthrop University, an MA from Auburn University, and a PhD from the Rhetoric/Composition program at the University of South Carolina. His work has appeared in Pedagogy, JAC, Workplace: A Journal for Academic Labor, Across the Disciplines, Communication Law Review, and others. Most recently, he co-led, along with colleagues Polly Boruff-Jones, Mark Canada, Christina Downey, and Mike Caulfield, AASCU‘s webinar series “Digital Literacy in the Time of Pandemic.” Paul lives in Indianapolis just off the Monon Trail, the subject of one of his current writing projects. As always, the theme music is "Parade" by nctrnm, and both the book and podcast are licensed by a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International license. The full book was published by the West Virginia University Libraries and Digital Publishing Institute; find it online for free at https://textbooks.lib.wvu.edu/badideas. All ad revenue will be split between the NAACP Legal Defense & Educational Fund and the Computers and Writing Graduate Research Network.
16:29
September 04, 2020
4: First-Year Composition Prepares Students for Academic Writing, by Tyler Branson
Kyle Stedman (@kstedman) reads the bad idea "First-Year Composition Prepares Students for Academic Writing" by Tyler Branson (@TylerBranson), a chapter from Bad Ideas about Writing, which was edited by Cheryl E. Ball (@s2ceball) and Drew M. Loewe (@drewloewe). Chapter keywords: citizenship, current traditionalism, freshman composition, process theory, writing studies Tyler S. Branson is an assistant professor of English and associate director of composition at the University of Toledo. He teaches lower- and upper-division writing and rhetoric courses, including first-year writing, writing for public discourse, and business writing. His research focuses primarily on the practice of rhetoric and writing in public contexts. He also has related interests in civic engagement, histories of rhetoric and composition, and writing pedagogy. He is currently working on a book project focusing on the role of what he calls problematic partnerships in the field of writing studies. He occasionally blogs at http://tylersbranson.wordpress.com and tweets @tylerbranson. (2017 bio) The theme music is "Parade" by nctrnm, and both the book and podcast are licensed by a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International license. The full book was published by the West Virginia University Libraries and Digital Publishing Institute; find it online for free at https://textbooks.lib.wvu.edu/badideas.
14:33
August 28, 2020
3: America is Facing a Literacy Crisis, by Jacob Babb
Kyle Stedman (@kstedman) reads the bad idea "America is Facing a Literacy Crisis" by Jacob Babb (@JacobSBabb), a chapter from Bad Ideas about Writing, which was written by Cheryl E. Ball (@s2ceball) and Drew M. Loewe (@drewloewe). Chapter keywords: first-year writing, knowledge transfer, literacy crisis, semiliterates Jacob Babb is an associate professor of English at Indiana University Southeast. He has been teaching composition courses since 2004, including first-year and upper-level courses in rhetoric, argumentative writing, professional writing, and digital writing at multiple institutions. He has published articles and book chapters on epideictic rhetoric, writing program administration, and writing assessment. He is the associate editor of WPA: Writing Program Administration. His Twitter handle is @JacobSBabb. The theme music is "Parade" by nctrnm, and both the book and podcast are licensed by a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International license. The full book is edited by Cheryl E. Ball and Drew M. Loewe and was published for free by the West Virginia University Libraries and Digital Publishing Institute; find it online at https://textbooks.lib.wvu.edu/badideas.
12:40
August 21, 2020
2: Rhetoric is Synonymous with Empty Speech, by Patricia Roberts-Miller
Kyle Stedman (@kstedman) reads the bad idea "Rhetoric is Synonymous with Empty Speech" by Patricia Roberts-Miller (https://www.patriciarobertsmiller.com/), a chapter from Bad Ideas about Writing, which was written by Cheryl E. Ball (@s2ceball) and Drew M. Loewe (@drewloewe). Chapter keywords: conceptual metaphor, deliberative rhetoric, public argumentation, rhetorical topoi Patricia Roberts-Miller is a professor in the Department of Rhetoric and Writing at the University of Texas at Austin, where she also directs the writing center. Her scholarly and teaching interests include the history and theory of public argumentation—as she likes to put it, she’s a “scholar of train wrecks in public deliberation.” More about Trish can be found at patriciarobertsmiller.com. (2017 bio) The theme music is "Parade" by nctrnm, and both the book and podcast are licensed by a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International license. The full book is edited by Cheryl E. Ball and Drew M. Loewe and was published for free by the West Virginia University Libraries and Digital Publishing Institute; find it online at https://textbooks.lib.wvu.edu/badideas.
14:37
August 14, 2020
1: Introduction, by Cheryl E. Ball and Drew M. Loewe
In today's episode, Kyle Stedman (@kstedman) reads the Introduction to Bad Ideas about Writing, which was written by Cheryl E. Ball (@s2ceball) and Drew M. Loewe (@drewloewe). Cheryl E. Ball is associate professor of digital publishing studies in the Professional Writing and Editing program at West Virginia University. She is also editor of Kairos: A Journal of Rhetoric, Technology, and Pedagogy as well as the #writing book series with the WAC Clearinghouse/Colorado State University Open Press, both of which are open-access publishing venues available to anyone with an Internet connection. She teaches the importance of editing content in a digital world, and offers a special thank you to all of the undergraduate and graduate students at WVU who helped with the publication of this book. She also thanks WVU Libraries for its support of the Digital Publishing Institute. Finally, she is grateful to Drew M. Loewe for coming up with the idea for this book and for agreeing to let her work on it with him. Drew M. Loewe is an associate professor of writing and rhetoric at St. Edward’s University in Austin, Texas, where he also directs the Writing Center. His scholarly and teaching interests include rhetorical theory and criticism, argumentation, prose style, legal writing, writing centers, research methods, and the first-year writing sequence. He thanks St. Edward’s for supporting this project with time and money, and especially thanks Cheryl E. Ball for being the best co-editor anyone could hope for. The theme music is "Parade" by nctrnm, and both the book and podcast are licensed by a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International license. The full book is edited by Cheryl E. Ball and Drew M. Loewe and was published by the West Virginia University Libraries and Digital Publishing Institute; find it online for free at https://textbooks.lib.wvu.edu/badideas.  I (Kyle) made a mistake in the closing credits section of this episode: I thought I'd be able to post the full text of the chapter here in the show notes, but I don't actually have enough space. So for the text version of this chapter, please find the text in the link above.  
09:38
July 31, 2020