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The CEPEO Podcast

The CEPEO Podcast

By CEPEO

The Centre for Education Policy and Equalising Opportunities (CEPEO) at UCL Institute of Education. We create research to improve the education system and equalise opportunities for all.
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Who goes to private school? Looking beyond the money.

The CEPEO Podcast

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CEPEO Seminar Series - Dr Richard Murphy on Class rank and long-run outcomes
CEPEO Seminar Series - Dr Richard Murphy on Class rank and long-run outcomes
In this webinar, Dr Richard Murphy from the University of Texas will discuss his paper which considers an unavoidable feature of the school environment, class rank.  He will also discuss the necessary assumptions for the identification of rank effects and propose new solutions to identification challenges. Using administrative data on all public-school students in Texas, Richard's paper show that students with a higher third-grade academic rank, conditional on achievement and classroom fixed effects, have higher subsequent test scores, are more likely to take AP classes, graduate from high school, enroll in and graduate from college, and ultimately have higher earnings 19 years later.  CEPEO seminar series The Centre for Education Policy and Equalising Opportunities (CEPEO) hosts a research seminar series where guest speakers present cutting edge research.  Join policymakers, researchers and practitioners to explore the pressing questions of our time in education policy and equalising opportunities.
01:02:07
June 28, 2021
CEPEO Seminar Series - Dr. Alice Badbury & Prof. Dominic Wyse on Reading, phonics and testing: teaching during the pandemic and beyond
CEPEO Seminar Series - Dr. Alice Badbury & Prof. Dominic Wyse on Reading, phonics and testing: teaching during the pandemic and beyond
Alice Bradbury is Associate Professor of Sociology of Education at the UCL Institute of Education (IOE), and Co-Director of the Helen Hamlyn Centre for Pedagogy (0-11 years) (HHCP). Her research interests are in the relationship between education policy and inequalities in terms of class, gender, and 'race'. Her research examines the impact of policy in primary and early years education with a focus on issues of social justice. Recent research projects have focused on the role of the priorities of primary schools during Covid (funded by ESRC) and the retention of BME teachers in schools in areas of disadvantage (funded by the British Academy). Alice's latest book, Ability, Inequality and Post-Pandemic Schools: Rethinking Contemporary Myths of Meritocracy will be published in June 2021. Dominic Wyse is Professor of Early Childhood and Primary Education at University College London (UCL), Institute of Education (IOE). He is President of the British Educational Research Association (BERA), and Founding Director of the Helen Hamlyn Centre for Pedagogy (0-11 years) (HHCP). Dominic is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences (FAcSS), and a fellow of the Royal Society for the encouragement of Arts, Manufactures, and Commerce (RSA). The main focus of Dominic’s research is curriculum and pedagogy. His research has contributed to the understanding the pedagogy of writing, reading, literacy, and creativity across the life-course (e.g. How Writing Works: From the Invention of the Alphabet to the Rise of Social Media - Cambridge University Press; and The Good Writing Guide 4th Edition SAGE).
01:00:24
June 11, 2021
CEPEO Seminar Series - Susannah Hume, The Policy Institute - What do mature learners look for? Results from a conjoint experiment.
CEPEO Seminar Series - Susannah Hume, The Policy Institute - What do mature learners look for? Results from a conjoint experiment.
Title: What do mature learners look for? Results from a conjoint experiment. Abstract: Universities are increasingly concerned with how to attract and support mature learners into higher education courses. Qualitative research suggests that mature learners – whose priorities, constraints, work experience, and other commitments are likely to diverge from their 18-year-old peers – respond to different aspects of a higher education offer. However, this research generally features small samples of participants, is conducted with current mature learners (usually in institutions that specialise in mature learners), and relies on their self-report of what attracted them to a course. Working with the Centre for Transforming Access and Student Outcomes in Higher Education, we conducted a conjoint survey experiment with 2500 adults who were not currently studying, and whose highest qualification was Level 3 or below. We presented them a series of random permutations of HE courses, to assess which features tended to make a course more attractive or preferable. The results of this experiment can inform both an understanding of what matters to mature learners and the design of schemes to support their access to higher education. Bio(s): Susannah Hume is Director of Evaluation in the Policy Institute at King’s College London. Her research focuses on the effectiveness of social programmes, particularly those relating to social justice, access to education, and civic participation. Dr Eliza Kozman is Deputy Director (Research) at the Centre of Transforming Access and Student Outcomes in Higher Education. Eliza has a strong interest in social mobility and a background in higher education policy.
47:35
May 17, 2021
CEPEO Seminar Series - Hannah Nash on the Impact of COVID on Key Learning and Education (ICKLE) project
CEPEO Seminar Series - Hannah Nash on the Impact of COVID on Key Learning and Education (ICKLE) project
In this podcast, Hannah Nash presents the preliminary findings from the UKRI funded ICKLE project which is investigating the impact of COVID-19 schools closures on the progress of children who were in reception in 2020 and are now in year 1. Using a longitudinal design, the project is investigating the impact of COVID-19 schools closures on the progress of children who were in reception in 2020 and are now in year 1. The project uses data recorded by schools at three points – before the pandemic, in early Autumn 2020, and in Spring 2021 and survey data on home learning. These data will be used to investigate the factors that have moderated and mediated pupil progress against a subset of the Early Years Foundation Stage Profile goals and reading levels. Speaker: Dr Hannah Nash is a lecturer in the School of Psychology at the University of Leeds. Her research focuses on typical and atypical language and reading development and she is the principal investigator for the ICKLE project. Hannah completed her BSc, MsC & PhD at the University of York (2007) and has since worked as a research fellow at Lancaster University, the University of York and most recently UCL, before joining the School of Psychology as a Lecturer in October 2013. Her work contributes to the ‘Successful childhood development’ Grand Challenge within the School of Psychology. Within the School, Hannah heads the Language and Memory Lab and she represents Psychology at Language@Leeds and the Leeds Centre for Interdisciplinary Childhood and Youth Research. CEPEO seminar series The Centre for Education Policy and Equalising Opportunities (CEPEO) hosts a research seminar series where guest speakers present cutting edge research. Join policymakers, researchers and practitioners to explore the pressing questions of our time in education policy and equalising opportunities.
57:16
April 19, 2021
CEPEO Seminar Series - Dr Jenifer Ruiz-Valenzuela on college value-added and returns to field of study in further education
CEPEO Seminar Series - Dr Jenifer Ruiz-Valenzuela on college value-added and returns to field of study in further education
In this podcast, Dr Jenifer Ruiz-Valenzuela discusses the value-added of colleges providing vocational education to young and adult learners in England, and the returns to different fields of study taught at these colleges. Using unique panel data that includes multiple measures of students' ability and background characteristics, Jenifer will account for usual threats to identification. Jenifer found moderate heterogeneity in college value-added for outcomes such as daily earnings and employment probabilities Dispersion in value-added for academic outcomes was more pronounced. Earnings returns vary substantially across fields of study. Earnings returns were higher for young than for adult learners and tend to be larger for females. Jenifer Ruiz-Valenzuela is a Research Economist at the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics (LSE). Jenifer is also the research coordinator of the Centre for Vocational Education Research, also at LSE. Her research spans different areas on the economics of education and labour economics. She holds a PHD in Economics from the European University Institute.
01:00:01
March 29, 2021
CEPEO Seminar Series - Ruth Lupton, Sanne Velthuis and Lorna Unwin - Equalising opportunities in post-16 progression in England
CEPEO Seminar Series - Ruth Lupton, Sanne Velthuis and Lorna Unwin - Equalising opportunities in post-16 progression in England
This seminar explores research funded by the Nuffield Foundation, looking at the characteristics and post-16 trajectories of young people who miss out on the key benchmarks of GCSE maths and English at grades 9-4 (formerly A*-C). This group is too often overlooked in the policy focus on raising GCSE attainment and improving access to higher education. In this seminar, Ruth Lupton and her team illuminate the heterogeneity of this large group in terms of their prior achievements. They show how groups with different achievements fare in navigating the complex landscape of post-16 provision in England. One of their objectives is to increase the visibility of characteristics and experiences of young people who are too often defined by what they have not achieved and to show how their opportunities for post-16 progression could be improved. The team also argues that tackling inequalities in the post-16 phase cannot be done without improvements in data and research capacity and discusses ideas on how this might be done. About the Speakers Ruth Lupton Honorary Professor of Education at the University of Manchester Ruth’s research focuses on UK poverty and inequality, particularly in relation to education and spatial inequalities. Before joining the University of Manchester in 2013, she was Deputy Director of the Centre for Analysis of Social Exclusion (CASE) at LSE. Ruth also worked at the IOE for four years in the 2000s. Her recent work includes a review of the Conservatives’ record on compulsory education since 2015 with Polina Obolenskaya, a forthcoming book on 'Great Mistakes in Education Policy: and how to avoid them in the future' (with Debra Hayes, Policy Press April 2021), and leadership of the Joseph Rowntree Foundation funded Inclusive Growth Analysis Unit at the University of Manchester. Ruth is interested in local approaches to poverty and inequality and is currently a member of the Greater Manchester Independent Inequalities Commission chaired by Professor Kate Pickett. Sanne Velthuis Research Associate at the University of Manchester Sanne’s research interests include young people in further education and the labour market, as well as issues surrounding low pay and progression, and spatial inequalities in employment, skills and opportunities. She completed her PhD at Coventry University before moving to the University of Manchester, where she has researched young people’s education and training transitions, as well as processes of neighbourhood change. In her current role, she has researched the employment trajectories of low-paid workers in the UK. Lorna Unwin Professor Emerita (Vocational Education) and Honorary Professorial Fellow at LLAKES research centre at the UCL Institute of Education, London. Lorna is also Honorary Professorial Research Fellow at the School of Environment, Education and Development, University of Manchester, and Honorary Fellow of the National Institute of Economic and Social Research. She has conducted many studies of post-school education and vocational and workplace training and recently conducted a comparative study of aerospace engineering apprentices in England and Germany with colleagues at the University of Cologne. She has also been working with Ruth Lupton on studies of the education and training infrastructure in Greater Manchester. Her recent books include ‘Contemporary Apprenticeship: International Perspectives on an Evolving Model of Learning’, published by Routledge (co-edited with Alison Fuller) and the 'Wiley International Handbook on Vocational Education and Training' (co-edited with David Guile).
01:00:18
March 15, 2021
CEPEO Seminar Series - Dr. Claire Crawford - The impact of school closures on children’s wellbeing
CEPEO Seminar Series - Dr. Claire Crawford - The impact of school closures on children’s wellbeing
The impact of school closures on children’s wellbeing The effects of the covid-19 pandemic on mental health, especially amongst children, are receiving increasing attention. What is less clear are the channels through which these effects are operating. This paper helps fill this gap by isolating the impact of school closures on children’s mental health. We exploit the way in which primary school children were invited to return to school in England in the summer term of 2020, with government advice being that all children in reception, Year 1 and Year 6 should be invited to return from 1 June, while only vulnerable children and children of key workers could attend in Years 2, 3, 4 and 5. We adopt a difference-in-differences approach with child fixed effects, comparing changes over time (before the pandemic to July 2020) between children who were and were not invited to return to school using parent reports from the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ). Using reports from September 2020 – when all children had been invited to return school – we can also explore the extent to which these effects persist. Claire joined the Department of Economics at Birmingham Business School as a Reader in Economics in July 2018. Prior, she was an Assistant Professor of Economics at the University of Warwick, starting in January 2014. Claire started her career at the Institute for Fiscal Studies (IFS). She remains a Research Fellow of the IFS and is also an Associate of the Centre for Competitive Advantage in the Global Economy (CAGE) at Warwick and a member of the National Audit Office-University of Birmingham tax centre.
01:02:08
March 08, 2021
CEPEO Seminar Series - Dr. Clémentine Van Effenterre on School Schedule and the Gender Pay Gap
CEPEO Seminar Series - Dr. Clémentine Van Effenterre on School Schedule and the Gender Pay Gap
School Schedule and the Gender Pay Gap  Clémentine Van Effenterre provides causal evidence that children’s school schedules contribute to the persistence of the gender pay gap between parents. Historically, French children have had no school on Wednesdays. In 2013, a reform reallocated some classes to Wednesday mornings. Exploiting variations in the application of this reform over time and across the age of the youngest child, she shows that mothers are more likely to adopt a regular Monday-Friday full-time working schedule after the reform, while fathers’ labour supply is unchanged. Consequently, the reform decreased the monthly gender pay gap by 6 percent, generating fiscal revenues that substantially outweigh its cost. Clémentine Van Effenterre is an assistant professor of economics at the University of Toronto. Her research interests include labour economics, public economics and political economy. Her work investigates how organizations, institutions and social norms can affect gender differences in human capital investment decisions, labour market performances. Prior to joining the University of Toronto, Van Effenterre was a postdoctoral fellow at the Harvard Kennedy School. She received a Ph.D. in economics from the Paris School of Economics. She is the host of InequaliTalks, an economics podcast about inequality.
59:48
January 29, 2021
First steps in working out what works for children’s social care
First steps in working out what works for children’s social care
Welcome to the CEPEO podcast, the podcast series for the Centre for Education Policy and Equalising Opportunities at the UCLs Institute for Education. In today's episode, we have an intriguing discussing between our own Dr. Jake Anders and Michael Sanders, Chief Executive of What Works for Children's Social Care.
12:07
July 27, 2020
Intellectual Curiosity and Pupil Achievement
Intellectual Curiosity and Pupil Achievement
Welcome back to the CEPEO podcast, the podcast series for the Centre for Education Policy and Equalising Opportunities (CEPEO) at the UCL Institute of Education. In this episode, Professor Sophie Von Stumm, Professor of Psychology in Education at the University of York and Director of the Hungry Mind Lab discusses her research on Intellectual Curiosity and Pupil Achievement.
29:49
May 18, 2020
Who goes to private school? Looking beyond the money.
Who goes to private school? Looking beyond the money.
Welcome back to the CEPEO podcast, the podcast series for the Centre for Education Policy and Equalising Opportunities at the UCL Institute of Education. In this episode, Dr Jake Anders, Associate Professor of Educational and Social Statistics at UCL and a Deputy Director in CEPEO, talks about his recently released research in the British Educational Research Journal - “Determinants of private school participation: all about the money?
10:03
March 14, 2020
How do we best teach science?
How do we best teach science?
Welcome to the CEPEO podcast, the podcast series for the Centre for Education Policy and Equalising Opportunities at the UCL Institute of Education. In this episode, Dr Sam Sims, Research Fellow at UCL, discusses the impact of inquiry science teaching, based on research conducted with John Jerrim and Mary Oliver.
12:21
February 03, 2020