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Stories with Street CRed

Stories with Street CRed

By Christian Red
A long-time print investigative journalist brings unique sports stories and beyond to a new platform.
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Interview with legendary photographer Neil Leifer

Stories with Street CRed

Interview with legendary photographer Neil Leifer

Stories with Street CRed

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Interview with former NFL executive Ernie Accorsi
Growing up in Hershey, Pennsylvania, Ernie Accorsi had an early, rich sports experience, when the Philadelphia Eagles held training camp there, and where the Wilt Chamberlain-led Philadelphia Warriors trained and played. Accorsi started out as a sportswriter, before being hired by the Baltimore Colts in 1970 as the public relations director, the start of Accorsi's long career in the NFL. In this latest "Stories with Street Cred" podcast, Accorsi discusses his distinguished NFL arc, his childhood memories in Hershey, and his sportswriting experiences, which included an interview with Moonlight Graham, and an exclusive scoop on Chamberlain's trade to the Lakers. Accorsi's last NFL executive post was general manager of the Giants, and perhaps his signature front office move was acquiring quarterback Eli Manning in a draft-day trade with San Diego. Manning, of course, went on to beat Tom Brady twice in the Super Bowl. 
01:26:07
January 30, 2021
Interview with legendary photographer Neil Leifer
In a career that has spanned more than 60 years, and which began in an era when film was still used by photographers, Neil Leifer has taken some of the most iconic sports images -- Muhammad Ali glowering over Sonny Liston; Ali and Joe Frazier with promoter Don King; an overhead shot at the Houston Astrodome of the 1966 Ali-Cleveland Williams fight after Williams was KO'd -- when he worked for Sports Illustrated and later Time magazine. In this latest "Stories with Street CRed" podcast, I talk with Leifer about his life and legendary career, and we discuss his latest book, "Leifer. Boxing. 60 years of Fights and Fighters," published by Taschen. 
01:15:24
December 19, 2020
Interview with Jana Webb, founder and CEO of Joga
The Toronto-based Jana Webb has been a trailblazer in professional sports and in the strength and conditioning world, and her career path as a fitness expert and the founder of Joga is one that has had several pivots and restarts. But after starting her own company, Webb's success led to TV opportunities -- including a stint on "Real Housewives of Toronto" -- red-carpet events around the world and business partnerships training elite athletes in the NFL, CFL, MLB, NBA, and NHL. Webb suffered a near-death car accident in 2016, and in the fallout, she had to begin an arduous rehabilitation and later, the rebuilding of her career. Webb joins the latest "Stories with Street CRed" podcast to tell her inspirational and motivational story.  
37:48
December 14, 2020
Interview with two former New York Daily News Yankees beat writers - Peter Botte and Anthony McCarron.
Aspiring sports journalists may not be able to fathom a time when there weren't cell phones at your disposal, or when social media didn't exist to post a breaking news nugget. Former New York Daily News colleagues Peter Botte and Anthony McCarron can attest to just such an era, as both were Yankees beat writers when the franchise was in the midst of a dynasty under manager Joe Torre, and when owner George Steinbrenner was still at his blustery best. The New York tabloid rivalry was alive, the back pages ruled, and there was no shortage of pressure and stress on the job. Fasten your seatbelts for a trip back in time. 
58:51
December 4, 2020
Interview with former Olympic speed skating hopeful Bridie Farrell
Since the Boy Scouts of America filed for bankruptcy, social justice advocate Bridie Farrell has worked with former Scouts who may have been victims of sexual abuse. She has raised awareness about different legal options, including how Scout sex abuse survivors can file a bankruptcy claim. Farrell, who is a sex abuse survivor and who founded the non-profit "America Loves Kids," has been a consultant for the law firm Motley Rice, which is handling many of those bankruptcy claims. Farrell also discusses the New York Child Victims Act and some of the other sex abuse scandals, and she hopes that by continuing the national discussion on this issue, other survivors will be encouraged to tell their stories as well. 
29:25
November 16, 2020
Interview with former Olympic speed skating hopeful Bridie Farrell and reporter Mike O'Keeffe
Bridie Farrell was a teenage Olympic hopeful in short track speed skating when she crossed paths with an older male star of that sport. The relationship became an abusive one, Farrell says, and for years she stayed silent about her ordeal. But after she went public with what she experienced, she became a tireless social justice advocate. In this Part Two of the latest "Stories with Street CRed" podcast, Farrell joins me and reporter Mike O'Keeffe to discuss her story, sex abuse in sports, the challenges covering this issue and the passage of the Child Victims Act in New York State. 
47:59
October 8, 2020
Interview with investigative reporter Michael O'Keeffe
In the early 2000s, New York Daily News reporter Mike O'Keeffe worked on a series of stories involving Ernie Lorch, the founder of the powerful Riverside Church youth basketball program. Lorch, who died in 2012, had been accused of sex abuse by several former Riverside players. In the first of a two-part podcast, O'Keeffe and I discuss the Lorch case and other sex abuse scandals in sports; the challenges with reporting these kinds of stories and some of the recent milestones for survivors, including the passage of the Child Victims Act in New York State. 
36:39
October 7, 2020
New York Giants defensive great and two-time Super Bowl champ Leonard Marshall
Leonard Marshall was a second-round pick by the New York Giants in the 1983 draft, and his rookie season coincided with Bill Parcells' first year as head coach of the team. Marshall went on to star for 10 seasons with Big Blue and won two Super Bowl rings as a key player on those great Giants defenses, which were coached by Bill Belichick. Marshall had perhaps his career-defining moment in the 1990 NFC Championship Game, when the Giants played the two-time defending Super Bowl champion San Francisco 49ers at Candlestick Park. Marshall crushed Hall of Fame quarterback Joe Montana in the fourth quarter, paving the way for the Giants' victory and Super Bowl berth against the Buffalo Bills. After 12 seasons in the NFL, Marshall has become a successful businessman, branching out into real estate and becoming an advocate for the cannabis industry. 
49:16
September 13, 2020
Interview with former NFL player and Super Bowl champion Marvin Washington
Drafted by the New York Jets in 1989, defensive end Marvin Washington played eight seasons for the Jets before ending his NFL career with the 49ers. He was also a member of the 1998 Denver Broncos team that won Super Bowl XXXIII against the Atlanta Falcons. Washington discusses a wide range of topics, including athletes' activism today compared with when he played; what it is like to be an African-American father and to raise children in this country; the 1992 Jets-Chiefs game in which Washington's teammate, the late Dennis Byrd, was paralyzed; and his post-playing days, where he has become a leading voice in the cannabis industry. 
46:05
August 29, 2020
Al Downing Interview Episode Two
In this two-part "Stories with Street CRed" podcast, I interview former major league pitcher Al Downing, who played for 17 years in the majors. The Trenton, New Jersey-born Downing, a left-hander, began his pro career with the Yankee and played with the likes of Hall of Famers Mickey Mantle, Whitey Ford and Yogi Berra. Downing was also Yankee teammates with Elston Howard, the first African-American to play for the Yankees in the years after Jackie Robinson broke baseball’s color barrier in 1947. At the age of 22, Downing started Game 2 of the 1963 World Series between the Yankees and Dodgers. A year later, Downing would start Game 4 of the 1964 World Series against the Cardinals, and he would also pitch in relief twice during that seven-game series. Downing’s early baseball career overlapped with the civil rights movement and the turbulent ‘60s, and he pitched during an era when there were numerous prominent black pitchers who were the aces of their staff -- Hall of Famers Bob Gibson and Fergie Jenkins, lefty Vida Blue, Blue Moon Odom and Downing to name a few. Downing spent the second half of his career with the Dodgers after brief stops with the Oakland A's and Milwaukee Brewers during the 1970 season. And although Downing had a terrific overall career that included one season of at least 20 wins and a career 123 - 107 record, many baseball fans remember that he was the opposing pitcher on the Dodgers who gave up Hank Aaron’s record-breaking 715th home run on April 8, 1974, when the Hammer moved past Babe Ruth on the all-time home run list. This interview features Downing's reflections on a wide range of topics, including his early baseball career, the social unrest in the country when Downing played compared with recent events in 2020, and the details surrounding that night in Atlanta when he became part of history.
36:02
August 8, 2020
Al Downing Interview Episode One
In this two-part "Stories with Street CRed" podcast, I interview former major league pitcher Al Downing, who played for 17 years in the majors. The Trenton, New Jersey-born Downing, a left-hander, began his pro career with the Yankee and played with the likes of Hall of Famers Mickey Mantle, Whitey Ford and Yogi Berra. Downing was also Yankee teammates with Elston Howard, the first African-American to play for the Yankees in the years after Jackie Robinson broke baseball’s color barrier in 1947.  At the age of 22, Downing started Game 2 of the 1963 World Series between the Yankees and Dodgers. A year later, Downing would start Game 4 of the 1964 World Series against the Cardinals, and he would also pitch in relief twice during that seven-game series. Downing’s early baseball career overlapped with the civil rights movement and the turbulent ‘60s, and he pitched during an era when there were numerous prominent black pitchers who were the aces of their staff -- Hall of Famers Bob Gibson and Fergie Jenkins, lefty Vida Blue, Blue Moon Odom and Downing to name a few. Downing spent the second half of his career with the Dodgers after brief stops with the Oakland A's and Milwaukee Brewers during the 1970 season. And although Downing had a terrific overall career that included one season of at least 20 wins and a career 123 - 107 record, many baseball fans remember that he was the opposing pitcher on the Dodgers who gave up Hank Aaron’s record-breaking 715th home run on April 8, 1974, when the Hammer moved past Babe Ruth on the all-time home run list. This interview features Downing's reflections on a wide range of topics, including his early baseball career, the social unrest in the country when Downing played compared with recent events in 2020, and the details surrounding that night in Atlanta when he became part of history.
39:52
August 8, 2020
Operation Equine: A Look Back at a Landmark Federal Steroids Investigation
Mark McGwire's and Sammy Sosa's 1998 home run chase was the focus of a recent ESPN documentary, however the film only contained a cursory look at the steroids and performance-enhancing drug links to each former slugger. McGwire would admit to his PED use in 2010 during a televised interview, but his name had surfaced during a landmark federal investigation into steroids trafficking decades earlier, when two Michigan FBI agents carried out Operation Equine from 1989 to 1993. In this interview, those two retired agents, Greg Stejskal and Bill Randall, discuss the origins of the investigation, the hurdles and obstacles they faced at the time, and how the names of McGwire and Jose Canseco first came up during their investigation. I was part of a New York Daily News sports investigative team that covered the Equine case in a series of stories starting in February, 2005, and the exclusive coverage preceded the infamous congressional hearing on steroids and sports where McGwire and Sosa were both witnesses. Equine netted over 70 convictions, and the goal was never to target users. But the case served as a precursor to what was to become of the sports doping landscape. 
58:55
July 23, 2020