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Cinemallennials

Cinemallennials

By Dave Lewis
Hosted by Dave Lewis, Cinemallennials is a podcast where he and another millennial watch a classic film that they haven’t seen before ranging from the early 1900s to the late 1960s and discuss its significance and relevance in our world today.
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The Wizard of Oz (1939)

Cinemallennials

The Wizard of Oz (1939)

Cinemallennials

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The Phantom of the Opera (1925)
On today’s episode of Cinemallennials, I talked with Will Pender, host of Now that’s What I call a podcast about the silent horror classic, The Phantom of the Opera starring the Man of a Thousand Faces, Lon Chaney, and the original scream queen, Mary Philbin. Lon Chaney paved the way for all of our favorite grotesque but deeply human onscreen characters. Costumed and made up creatures like Dracula, Frankenstein, the Wolfman, the Creature from the Black Lagoon, the Apes from The Planet of the Apes, The Elephant Man, Jar Jar Binks, The Amphibian Man from The Shape of Water and one of my all-time favorites, Gollum/Sméagol could have never been realized if Lon Chaney and his makeup never appeared on screen. Based on Gaston Leroux’s 1910 novel, The Phantom of the Opera follows the story of Christine Daae, a young singer who for years has been tutored by a kindly masked figure, known to her as Spirit of Music but known to everyone else as The Phantom of the Opera, a shadowy spirit that causes chaos when his musical sensibilities are disturbed by the Opera’s owners.  Defied once more and thought to have been betrayed by his muse, our, sometimes recognized as an empathetic figure, the Phantom goes on a rampage claiming if he can’t have Christine, no one can. So sit back, relax, and befriend the outcast. Cinemallennials is a podcast where myself and another millennial are introduced to a classic film for the very first time ranging from the birth of cinema to the 1960s. Myself and my guest will open your eyes to the vast landscape of classic film as we discuss the films' performers,  their performances, those behind the camera, and how they and their films still influence our world today. Website: https://dlewmoviereview.com/ Social Media: Facebook: facebook.com/dlewmoviereviews/ Twitter: twitter.com/dlewmoviereview Instagram: @cinemallennials
01:04:03
April 13, 2022
8 1/2 (1963)
On today’s episode of Cinemallennials, I talk with another K Cut podcast host, James Bunn about Frederico Fellini’s master work on the process of filmmaking, 8 ½. Frederico Fellini’s legacy is that of his films, grounded fantasy, a cavalcade of nostalgia, fever dreams, lust, and desire. From Tim Burton to David Lynch, Fellini is revered as one of the masters of surrealist cinema. Considered as one of the greatest films and filmmakers of all time, from both a technical perspective boasting praise amongst other cinematic legends like Martin Scorsese, Ferderico Fellini’s 8 ½ is a tour into the soul of an artist. Someone that both believes in their own hype and yet doesn’t one that tries to express the truths of life and the condition of humanity but perpetuates lies. 8 ½ follows the story of Guido Anselmi, a famous Italian director that is stuck between reminiscing on his past, and developing his next great project. Caught between his writers block, nagging producers, his affair with his wife and the pressure of being an artist, Guido’s life both professionally and personally is crumbling. Will this next project be his magnum opus? Or will it fade away in the bustle of this circus we call life? So sit back, relax, and don’t climb out of your car in bumper to bumper traffic. You can purchase 8 1/2 here. Cinemallennials is a podcast where myself and another millennial are introduced to a classic film for the very first time ranging from the birth of cinema to the 1960s. Myself and my guest will open your eyes to the vast landscape of classic film as we discuss the films' performers,  their performances, those behind the camera, and how they and their films still influence our world today. Website: https://dlewmoviereview.com/ Social Media: Facebook: facebook.com/dlewmoviereviews/ Twitter: twitter.com/dlewmoviereview Instagram: @cinemallennials
35:53
March 16, 2022
It Happened One Night (1934)
On today’s episode of Cinemallennials, I’ll be talking to film scholar and host of the Audiovisual Cultures podcast, Dr. Paula Blair about Frank Capra’s 1934 screwball comedy It Happened One Night. Although it might not look like all that much on the outside when googling or seeing the most famous clips from It Happened One Night,  the film could easily be considered as one of the most influential, and well received comedies of all time. You could name any screwball or romantic comedy whether it be films like His Girl Friday, The Philadelphia Story, Bringing Up Baby, When Harry Met Sally to the comedies that we grew up on like Clueless, 10 Things I Hate About You, The Proposal or even Star Wars and Spaceballs as I found out in the episode you’ll find a direct thread from It Happened One Night, It Happened One Night follows the story of Ellen Andrews, a young heiress that daringly escapes from the clutches of her father in Miami, Florida in order to reunite with her soon to be husband King Westley in New York City. On her travels, Ellie soon encounters Peter Warne, a rough and tumble news reporter who just got fired. Peter recognizes Ellie and tells his boss he has the story of the year. Initially at odds with each other as their upbringings and personalities clash, the combination of their common desire to see the escape through, and the rapport they build on their journey slowly grows into something unexpected for the both of them. So sit back, relax, and whatever you do, be careful when you’re singing and driving. You can purchase It Happened One Night here Cinemallennials is a podcast where myself and another millennial are introduced to a classic film for the very first time ranging from the  birth of cinema to the 1960s. Myself and my guest will open your eyes to the vast landscape of classic film as we discuss the films' performers,  their performances, those behind the camera, and how they and their films still influence our world today. Website: https://dlewmoviereview.com/ Social Media: Facebook: facebook.com/dlewmoviereviews/ Twitter: twitter.com/dlewmoviereview Instagram: @dlew88
58:59
February 09, 2022
Casablanca (1942)
On today’s episode of Cinemallennials, I’ll be talking with my girlfriend Alex about one of the most influential, romantic, and anti-fascist films of all time, the unconquerable Casablanca. Films like Star Wars, Indiana Jones, and Space Jam 2 as well as Disney World’s former greatest ride, The Great Movie Ride have all referenced or have directly used scenes from Casablanca. Whether you’ve watched Casablanca or not, it’s writing, costumes, themes, music, and iconic imagery most likely occupies the part of your brain that holds your stock of references and lines from popular culture. From its cast of both main and side characters, its brilliant writing with its layers of both timeless and contemporary wit and themes to its score and use of the art of moving pictures Casablanca has been consistently called “the perfect film.” Casablanca follows the story of Richard Blaine, a hard-hearted isolationist that owns Rick’s Café American, a popular club that nightly houses hundreds of refugees who are stuck in Morocco’s second largest city due to the Nazi regime. Rumors fill the city after two Nazi couriers were murdered carrying transit papers that allow their owners to freely leave the city and be on the path to freedom. Rick is soon secretly given those papers to hang on to but their owner is arrested right in front of his very eyes and that’s not even half his troubles. The night is still young until Rick’s former lover Ilsa Lund walks into his gin joint with her resistance leader husband Victor Laszlo who has just escaped a concentration camp and wants to expose the world to the true horrors of the Nazi regime. Ilsa knows just how influential her old flame is in this limbo and seeks his help but having been hurt by her in the past Rick isn’t so sure he should help them and that is where our story begins so sit back relax and Here’s looking at you kid. You can purchase Casablanca here. Cinemallennials is a podcast where myself and another millennial are introduced to a classic film for the very first time ranging from the  birth of cinema to the 1960s. Myself and my guest will open your eyes to the vast landscape of classic film as we discuss the films' performers,  their performances, those behind the camera, and how they and their films still influence our world today. Website: https://dlewmoviereview.com/ Social Media: Facebook: facebook.com/dlewmoviereviews/ Twitter: twitter.com/dlewmoviereview Instagram: @cinemallennials
01:02:44
August 18, 2021
The Wizard of Oz (1939)
On today’s episode of Cinemallennials, I’ll be talking with Lars Henriks, a director, actor, and host of the Lars Henriks Podcast International who picked a film that really needs no introduction, The Wizard of Oz (1939). From its storied production history to its long list of changes in its illustrious who’s who of writing and directing departments, featuring names like, Victor Fleming, George Cukor, King Vidor, and Herman J. Mankiewicz, The Wizard of Oz has long been considered one of the greatest films of all time. The Wizard of Oz’s legacy is probably one of the most, if not the most widely recognizable not only was its writing and directing nearly perfect, but its casting, musical composition, set design and costuming all have  influenced the world of filmmaking ever since the film was released in 1939. The Wizard of Oz follows the story of a girl from Kansas, Dorothy and her little dog Toto. After feeling underappreciated on her aunt and uncle’s farm, Dorothy decides to run away. She then bumps into a traveling magician who convinces her to return home due to an impending tornado. After getting home, she is soon  knocked out by a flying window pane. When she wakes up, Dorothy steps into a new world. A world full of magic and whimsy where she is regarded as a both a hero and a villain for killing the Wicked Witch of the East. The witch’s sister, The Wicked Witch of the West swears revenge on Dorothy and vows to prevent her from returning home. Now stranded and being hunted in this strange land, Dorothy takes the Yellow Brick Road to the Emerald City in order to seek the advice from Oz, the great and powerful, an all knowing Wizard. While on her way, she encounters a scarecrow, a tin man and a cowardly lion who are also looking for the Wizard. Teaming together, the fellowship travel to the Emerald City, but the road won’t be easy as the Wicked Witch of the West, her flying monkeys and other cronies are hot on their trail.  So sit back, relax, and we're off to see the wizard! You can purchase The Wizard of Oz here. Cinemallennials is a podcast where myself and another millennial are introduced to a classic film for the very first time ranging from the  birth of cinema to the 1960s. Myself and my guest will open your eyes to the vast landscape of classic film as we discuss the films' performers,  their performances, those behind the camera, and how they and their films still influence our world today. Website: https://dlewmoviereview.com/ Social Media: Facebook: facebook.com/dlewmoviereviews/ Twitter: twitter.com/dlewmoviereview Instagram: @cinemallennials
01:14:55
July 14, 2021
Planet of the Apes (1968)
On today's episode of Cinemallennials I talked with my cousin Devon about the 1968 science fiction classic, Planet of the Apes, directed by Franklin J. Schaffner and starring Charlton Heston, Roddy McDowall, and Kim Hunter. Planet of the Apes follows the story of a crew of astronauts that crash land on a planet 300 million light years into the future where their perception of both man and ape are reversed, the simians are intelligent and are the conquerors of the world where man is primitive and enslaved. Confronted with this discovery after being hunted by the apes, one of the astronauts Taylor becomes enslaved and has caught the eye of both an animal psychologist, Dr. Zira and her archeologist fiancée Cornelius who claims that apes evolved from man. Upon the discovery of this hypothesized missing link, the chief scientist and defender of the ape faith, Dr. Zaius does all that he can to exterminate Taylor in order to protect the dark knowledge only he knows. From featuring themes like racial supremacy to the balance of faith and science, Planet of the Apes is truly not only a hard Science-Fiction classic, but it is still extremely relevant for our world today. You can purchase Planet of the Apes here. Cinemallennials is a podcast where myself and another millennial are  introduced to a classic film for the very first time ranging from the  birth of cinema to the 1960s. Myself and my guest will open your eyes to  the vast landscape of classic film as we discuss the films' performers,  their performances, those behind the camera, and how they and their  films still influence our world today. Website: https://dlewmoviereview.com/ Social Media: Facebook: facebook.com/dlewmoviereviews/ Twitter: twitter.com/dlewmoviereview Instagram: @dlew88
58:40
June 16, 2021
The Great Escape (1963)
On today's episode of Cinemallennials I talked with James Wilson about the 1963 World War II film, The Great Escape directed by John Sturges and starring both British and Hollywood legends Steve McQueen, Richard Attenborough, James Garner, Charles Bronson, and Donald Pleasance. The Great Escape follows the story of a group of allied prisoners during World War II who are hell-bent on escaping from Stalag Luft III, a maximum-security prisoner of war camp. After previous attempts unfortunately failed, two master escapees, Captain Virgil Hilts and Squadron Leader Roger Bartlett enter into the camp and devise a most dangerous and daring escape plan, dig tunnels underneath the very ground the camp stands on in order to plunge the Nazi regime into a period of chaos distracting them from their evil campaign of hateful death and destruction. So, sit back, relax, and always make sure to stay in character when you’re trying to escape from a Nazi prisoner of war camp. You can purchase The Great Escape here Cinemallennials is a podcast where myself and another millennial are introduced to a classic film for the very first time ranging from the birth of cinema to the 1960s. Myself and my guest will open your eyes to the vast landscape of classic film as we discuss the films' performers, their performances, those behind the camera, and how they and their films still influence our world today. Website: https://dlewmoviereview.com/ Social Media: Facebook: facebook.com/dlewmoviereviews/ Twitter: twitter.com/dlewmoviereview Instagram: @cinemallennials
36:29
June 02, 2021
The Seventh Seal (1957)
On this episode of Cinemallennials, I talked with Oisín Ó Ruacháinn about Ingmar Bergman’s 1957 allegorical masterpiece, The Seventh Seal, a personal favorite of mine and is often considered to be one of the all-time greatest films ever made. The Seventh Seal launched Bergman’s reputation as a world-class director, ushered in a new era of the American movie-going experience allowing art house and international film to become more widely exposed, it launched the career of Max Von Sydow who you know from The Exorcist, Minority Report, Star Wars: The Force Awakens, Game of Thrones, and Skyrim. Finally, The Seventh Seal proved that film could be a wildly successful and popular vessel for philosophical themes like what is the meaning of life across a wide audience. The Seventh Seal follows the story of Antonius Block, a knight that has just returned to his native Sweden after 10 years on Crusade. As he aims to leave the rocky beach he and his squire land on, he is welcomed home by Death although initially, Block says he isn’t afraid, as death’s black cloak comes closer he admits his fear and challenges Death to a game of chess in order to stay alive and perform one last meaningful deed before the end. So sit back, relax, and don’t challenge death to a board game. You can buy The Seventh Seal here Cinemallennials is a podcast where myself and another millennial are introduced to a classic film for the very first time ranging from the birth of cinema to the 1960s. Myself and my guest will open your eyes to the vast landscape of classic film as we discuss the films' performers,  their performances, those behind the camera, and how they and their films still influence our world today. Website: https://dlewmoviereview.com/ Social Media: Facebook: facebook.com/dlewmoviereviews/ Twitter: twitter.com/dlewmoviereview Instagram: @cinemallennials
01:00:55
May 19, 2021
Shane (1953)
Hello, my name is Dave Lewis and I am the host of Cinemallennials, a podcast where myself and another millennial watch a classic film that we haven’t seen before ranging from the early 1900s to the late 1960s and discuss its significance and relevance in our world today. On today’s episode, I talked with Andreas Babiolakis, creator of FilmsFatale.com about the 1953 western Shane starring Alan Ladd, Jean Arthur, Van Heflin, and Brandon De Wilde directed by the great George Stevens who directed Giant, A Place in the Sun, The Diary of Anne Frank, and The Greatest Story Ever Told. Shane follows the story of a mysterious man named Shane who rides into the lives of humble homesteaders Joe, Marion, and their son Joey on the vast plains of Wyoming. Joey is immediately fascinated with the man and his ornamented gun belt thinking he must be this great hero that is until his mother tells him not to get too attached. Shane thinks he has a found a paradise until he is thrust into an ongoing war between the homesteaders and the local cattle baron, Ryker, and his gang. Shane feels he must act in order to protect the family he has fallen in love with and to redeem himself. So sit back, relax and “Come Back Shane!” You can purchase Shane here Cinemallennials is a podcast where myself and another millennial are introduced to a classic film for the very first time ranging from the birth of cinema to the 1960s. Myself and my guest will open your eyes to the vast landscape of classic film as we discuss the films' performers,  their performances, those behind the camera, and how they and their  films still influence our world today. Website: https://dlewmoviereview.com/ Social Media: Facebook: facebook.com/dlewmoviereviews/ Twitter: twitter.com/dlewmoviereview Instagram: @cinemallennials
50:38
May 05, 2021
The Great Dictator (1940)
On today’s episode, I am joined by Logan and Brayden from the Absolutely Gobsmacked Podcast who picked Charlie Chaplin’s 1940 satiric triumph, The Great Dictator. Charlie Chaplin is one of the most recognizable, and most important comedians of all time. By the late 1930s however, he had still not made the transition to sound causing critics to doubt the comedian’s future. As Nationalism and Fascism were out for all to see with the rise of Italy’s Benito Mussolini and with the similarly mustachioed Adolf Hitler and his Nazi thugs Chaplin chose to be a voice for the voiceless by wielding his comedy and humanist ideals against the world’s evil and intolerant. From his depiction of Hitler’s ridiculous mannerisms and hypocrisy to the now-viral sensation that is often called The Greatest Speech Ever, The Great Dictator was the first and is now the last laugh in face of Adolf Hitler and his current wannabees. The Great Dictator follows the story of a Jewish barber who develops amnesia after a plane crash during the last days of WWI. Over the next twenty years, while the barber is sheltered in a mental hospital, his countrymen turn their eye to evil as they give their beloved country of Tomainia over to the anti-Semitic fascist dictator Adenoid Hynkel who looks exactly like the Jewish barber. After being persecuted by Hynkel and his cronies, our barber soon has his memory restored, begins to rebel, and maybe the only one in the world that can stop Hynkel’s agenda of hate. So sit back, relax, and become a little more absent-minded. You can purchase The Great Dictator here Cinemallennials is a podcast where myself and another millennial are introduced to a classic film for the very first time ranging from the birth of cinema to the 1960s. Myself and my guest will open your eyes to the vast landscape of classic film as we discuss the films' performers,  their performances, those behind the camera, and how they and their films still influence our world today. Website: dlewmoviereview.com/ Social Media: Facebook: facebook.com/dlewmoviereviews/ Twitter: twitter.com/dlewmoviereview Instagram: @cinemallennials
49:47
April 21, 2021
Some Like It Hot (1959)
Hello, my name is Dave Lewis and I am the host of Cinemallennials, a podcast where myself and another millennial watch a classic film that we haven’t seen before ranging from the early 1900s to the late 1960s and discuss its significance and relevance in our world today. On today’s episode, I talked with Mary Jo Hernandez about the 1959 comedy, Some Like it Hot, directed by Hollywood legend Billy Wilder who wrote and directed films like Double Indemnity, Sunset Boulevard, Sabrina, and The Apartment. Some Like it Hot starring Marylin Monroe, Tony Curtis, and Jack Lemmon follows the story of Joe and Jerry, who just witnessed the famous St. Valentine Day’s Massacre and are on the run from gangster Spats Columbo. The lads have a brilliant idea in order to escape the windy city, the lads disguise themselves as women in order to join an all-girls band that’s on its way to Florida. Once they are accepted into the band, both Joe and Jerry go gaga over the band’s singer, Sugar Kane. Like the lads, Sugar also changes her identity to get what she wants when she meets the heir to the Shell Oil empire. From themes like faking it until you make it to the acceptance of new identities, Some Like it Hot is a hilarious but meaningful romp. So, sit back relax, and don’t be like most of the guys trying to pick up women in this movie. You can purchase Some Like it Hot here. Cinemallennials is a podcast where myself and another millennial are introduced to a classic film for the very first time ranging from the birth of cinema to the 1960s. Myself and my guest will open your eyes to the vast landscape of classic film as we discuss the films' performers,  their performances, those behind the camera, and how they and their films still influence our world today. Website: dlewmoviereview.com/ Social Media: Facebook: facebook.com/dlewmoviereviews/ Twitter: twitter.com/dlewmoviereview Instagram: @cinemallennials
26:29
April 07, 2021
Godzilla (1954)
On today’s episode, I talked with Izzy from Be Kind Rewind, her YouTube channel where she explores Hollywood history, women in film, and general film studies. Izzy picked the original 1954 Godzilla just in time for the newest chapter in the longest-running franchise in film history, Godzilla vs. Kong that comes out today internationally and on March 31st here in the United States. Godzilla follows the story of a massive jurassic beast called Godzilla that has been reawakened by recent nuclear H-bomb testing. Enraged by its rude awakening, Godzilla wreaks havoc on Japan. As another nuclear threat faces Japan nine years after the carnage dealt at Hiroshima and Nagasaki, both politicians and scientists bicker on how to approach the monster with its nuclear fallout breath. Do they study its resistance to the bombs or do they neutralize the threat outright, but the most complex of all these questions remains if it absorbed the colossal power of nuclear weapons how can it be killed? In order to find out, sit back, relax, and don’t get breathed on! You can purchase Godzilla here. Cinemallennials is a podcast where myself and another millennial are introduced to a classic film for the very first time ranging from the birth of cinema to the 1960s. Myself and my guest will open your eyes to the vast landscape of classic film as we discuss the films' performers,  their performances, those behind the camera, and how they and their films still influence our world today. Website: https://dlewmoviereview.com/ Social Media: Facebook: facebook.com/dlewmoviereviews/ Twitter: twitter.com/dlewmoviereview Instagram: @cinemallennials
46:56
March 24, 2021
Paths of Glory (1957)
On today’s episode, I talked with Nick Reed about the 1957 anti-war film, Paths of Glory, directed by the great Stanley Kubrick. Based on real-life events, Paths of Glory stars Kirk Douglas as Colonel Dax, who is ordered by his pompous, and overambitious commanding officer, played by George Macready to lead a suicide mission. After the attack fails, Colonel Dax is then forced to defend his men against accusations of cowardice and betrayal which could ultimately lead to their deaths. From the dehumanization of soldiers to the absurdity of the upper-class immunity of war consequences and its romanticizations of battle, Paths of Glory explores the effects war has on everyone involved, from overeager blood-stained general to innocent barmaids. So sit back, relax, and confront the reality of humanity’s greatest failures.  You can purchase Paths of Glory here. Cinemallennials is a podcast where myself and another millennial are introduced to a classic film for the very first time ranging from the birth of cinema to the 1960s. Myself and my guest will open your eyes to the vast landscape of classic film as we discuss the films' performers,  their performances, those behind the camera, and how they and their films still influence our world today. Website: dlewmoviereview.com/ Social Media: Facebook: facebook.com/dlewmoviereviews/ Twitter: twitter.com/dlewmoviereview Instagram: @cinemallennials
37:43
March 10, 2021
The Hidden Fortress (1958)
On today’s episode, I talked with Nolan Ryan, yes you heard that right and no its not that Nolan Ryan, but we talked about legendary Japanese director, Akria Kurosawa’s 1958 epic, The Hidden Fortress. If you’re in any way interested in film, you’ve heard of those kinds of films that did alright in the era in which they were born but would go on to inspire major blockbusters that were released much later, The Hidden Fortress is one of these films as depending on who you ask, has either inspired one of the biggest blockbusters in history, or the film’s director directly lifted from it and that film is Star Wars. The Hidden Fortress follows the accidental adventure of two peasants, Tahei and Matashichi who stumble onto a large cache of gold that was hidden by the recently defeated Akisuki clan. They decide to split the gold until a mysterious man begins to follow them, uncovers their plot, all while hiding a secret of his own, a fiery princess who longs to restore her clan and reunite with her people, if only there was a way to pass through enemy lines undetected and thus begins our adventure. So sit back, relax, and throw everything into the fire. You can purchase The Hidden Fortress here Cinemallennials is a podcast where myself and another millennial are introduced to a classic film for the very first time ranging from the birth of cinema to the 1960s. Myself and my guest will open your eyes to the vast landscape of classic film as we discuss the films' performers,  their performances, those behind the camera, and how they and their films still influence our world today. Website: dlewmoviereview.com/ Social Media: Facebook: facebook.com/dlewmoviereviews/ Twitter: twitter.com/dlewmoviereview Instagram: @cinemallennials
53:32
February 24, 2021
Seven Samurai (1954)
On today’s episode, I am joined by my cousin Sean Clark who picked Akria Kurosawa’s 1954 epic Seven Samurai. It’s considered from both a technical and ­­ cultural level, whether it be from its editing, camera techniques, symbolism, and its dialogue, as the most influential, remade, reworked, and referenced films of all time as well perhaps the greatest film ever made. Akira Kurosawa had created many films besides Seven Samurai that were remade and emulated by the most well-respected directors over the nearly 60 years he worked in the film industry. Rashomon, Yojimbo, Throne of Blood, The Hidden Fortress, Kagemusha, and Ran have all been personally cited as inspirations for the upper echelons of the directing world. The directors that Kurosawa’s films were muses for were; Ingmar Bergman, Frederico Fellini, Bernardo Bertolucci, Andrei Tarkovsky, Werner Herzog, Stanley Kubrick, and probably most famously, Steven Spielberg and George Lucas as you’ll see in the next episode of Cinemallennials.  Seven Samurai follows a village of poor farmers and their families under threat of yet another harvest raiding party made by a group of brutal bandits in one of Japan’s deadliest periods. After consulting with the local wise man, the farmers are set on their quest to find hungry samurai who are willing to defend the village from its impending doom. The farmers achieve their goal of finding and feeding their hungry samurai, but even both the villagers and the samurai might not be who they exactly claim to be. So, sit back relax, and don’t try to recruit samurai by attempting to knock them out.  You can purchase Seven Samurai here  Cinemallennials is a podcast where myself and another millennial are introduced to a classic film for the very first time ranging from the birth of cinema to the 1960s. Myself and my guest will open your eyes to the vast landscape of classic film as we discuss the films' performers,  their performances, those behind the camera, and how they and their films still influence our world today. Website: dlewmoviereview.com/ Social Media: Facebook: facebook.com/dlewmoviereviews/ Twitter: twitter.com/dlewmoviereview Instagram: @cinemallennials
51:37
February 10, 2021
The Big Sleep (1946)
On today’s episode, I talked with Devin Araujo about the 1946 noir, The Big Sleep. Produced and directed by the legendary Howard Hawks, starring the equally as legendary Humphrey Bogart and Lauren Bacall, who previously enchanted the word over in 1944’s To Have and Have Not, causing a massive call for the two stars and future Hollywood power couple to share the screen again. Private eye, Philip Marlowe (played by Bogey) is hired by aging millionaire general Sternwood to investigate the disappearance of Sean Regan, an ex-IRA officer and bootlegger that the general had hired to dig into his youngest daughter, Carmen’s gambling debts as the man looking for them, pornographer and rare book salesman, Geiger is on the prowl. Marlowe takes the job and tails Geiger home to find a drugged Carmen and a murdered Geiger. Marlowe takes Carmen home and recruits the help of Carmen’s older sister, Vivian, but he soon finds out that she’s no angel either. So sit back, relax, and don’t throw yourself at the first person you’re attracted to. You can purchase The Big Sleep here Cinemallennials is a podcast where myself and another millennial are introduced to a classic film for the very first time ranging from the birth of cinema to the 1960s. Myself and my guest will open your eyes to the vast landscape of classic film as we discuss the films' performers,  their performances, those behind the camera, and how they and their films still influence our world today. Website: dlewmoviereview.com/ Social Media: Facebook: facebook.com/dlewmoviereviews/ Twitter: twitter.com/dlewmoviereview Instagram: @dlew88
38:30
January 27, 2021
North by Northwest (1959)
On today’s episode, I talked with an old school friend of mine, Mike Bardzilowski who picked 1959’s North by Northwest starring Cary Grant, and New Jersey’s own, Eva Marie Saint. While our generation generally knows Alfred Hitchcock’s horror pictures like Psycho, and The Birds at this point in Hitchcock’s career he was known as the master of suspense, from his intrigue-based melodramas and psychological thrillers filled with heavy metaphors and themes. He was on one of the most prolific runs ever for a director in Hollywood, he made Dial M for Murder, Rear Window, To Catch a Thief, The Man Who Knew Too Much (his own remake), and Vertigo in 1958. Hitchcock wanted to take a break from that kind of filmmaking to make something fun. He had an idea for a master spy mistaken identity story, and always wanted to make a chase scene on the top of Mount Rushmore, but he and writer Ernest Lehman needed to fill in the rest and that’s how North by Northwest was born North by Northwest follows the story of Roger O. Thornhill, or ROT for short, a fast and loose-lipped ad-man that accidentally ends up being kidnapped by a group of spies that think he’s someone else, he luckily escapes their grasp, but not for too long as he is soon set up for the murder of a UN official, leading to a life of dodging both US authorities and communist agent until he runs into Eve Kendall, an elegant blonde that might have more to her than meets the eye. So sit back, relax, and… DUCK! You can purchase North by Northwest here Cinemallennials is a podcast where myself and another millennial are introduced to a classic film for the very first time ranging from the birth of cinema to the 1960s. Myself and my guest will open your eyes to the vast landscape of classic film as we discuss the films' performers,  their performances, those behind the camera, and how they and their films still influence our world today. Website: dlewmoviereview.com/ Social Media: Facebook: facebook.com/dlewmoviereviews/ Twitter: twitter.com/dlewmoviereview Instagram: @dlew88
49:49
January 13, 2021
All About Eve (1950)
On today’s episode, I talked with my cousin, Kelly, the executive editor on We are Bookish who also has a master’s degree in screenwriting, and you can tell by what she says in the show. Kelly picked 1950’s All About Eve, the first Best Picture winner we are talking about on the show. Written and directed by Joseph Mankiewicz, who adapted the script from a short story called The Wisdom of Eve by Mary Orr, All About Eve is a film that personifies theater by presenting the people who run them, play in them, and who obsessively consume it and the vicious cycle of it all. All About Eve due to its elegant and sharp-witted writing is often to be the greatest screenplay ever written, this is also due to the many interpretations people glean from the film, whether it be how women treat each other, how age plays a factor in acting, what does it mean to be successful as a woman and comments on sexuality making its appeal to be inherently intriguing to audiences ever since it was released in 1950. All About Eve is well, all about Eve, played by Anne Baxter in the sense of her relationship to Margot Channing, played by Bette Davis. Eve is obsessed with Margo and goes to see every show the actress is in, and one night she is invited to meet her matinee idol and tells Margo the tragic story of her life. Margo pities Eve and hires her, and even shelters her in her own home, her social circles, and professional career that is until Eve starts to pull on some of Margo’s established threads. So sit back, relax and fasten your seatbelts for a bumpy night.  You can purchase All About Eve here. Cinemallennials is a podcast where myself and another millennial are introduced to a classic film for the very first time ranging from the birth of cinema to the 1960s. Myself and my guest will open your eyes to the vast landscape of classic film as we discuss the films' performers,  their performances, those behind the camera, and how they and their films still influence our world today. Website: dlewmoviereview.com/ Social Media: Facebook: facebook.com/dlewmoviereviews/ Twitter: twitter.com/dlewmoviereview Instagram: @dlew88
54:52
December 30, 2020
Lost Horizon (1937): Peace on Earth and Goodwill Toward Men
On today’s episode, I talked with James Lamdin Founder and Director of Vintage and Pre-owned watches at Analog/Shift, a vintage and pre-owned watch boutique located in New York City, if our main character Robert was a New Yorker instead of a Brit, he’d be well acquainted with James who picked Frank Capra’s 1937 epic, Lost Horizon. Based on the 1933 novel of the same name written by James Hilton, Lost Horizon follows the story of Robert Conway, a war hero, author, and soon-to-be British foreign secretary who is fed up with a world that is progressively getting more and more aggressive and greedy by the second. After rescuing 90 white people like the film’s title storybook opening actually says, Conway his brother George, and three other refugees are unknowingly hijacked and are brought crashing down to a remote mountain range where they encounter a secret valley called Shangri-La where peace and prosperity reigns, for some, for others, they see it as a jail cell. So it back, relax, and spread peace on earth and goodwill toward men. You can purchase Lost Horizon here  Check out the amazing collection Analog/Shift has for all of your favorite watch geeks. Cinemallennials is a podcast where myself and another millennial are introduced to a classic film for the very first time ranging from the birth of cinema to the 1960s. Myself and my guest will open your eyes to the vast landscape of classic film as we discuss the films' performers,  their performances, those behind the camera, and how they and their films still influence our world today. Website: dlewmoviereview.com/ Social Media: Facebook: facebook.com/dlewmoviereviews/ Twitter: twitter.com/dlewmoviereview Instagram: @dlew88
01:27:17
December 16, 2020
Citizen Kane (1941)
On today’s episode, I talked with Christian Palacios, an old soccer and AP World history classmate and he picked a film that is steeped in both world and film history, and that film is, Citizen Kane. At the age of 16, Welles gets his acting debut using the gift of the gab in Dublin in 1931, fast 1935 he makes his radio debut, on CBS, a year later he establishes himself as a director with The Voodoo Macbeth, which featured an all-black cast adaptation of the accursed play. In 1937 he established Mercury Theatre and opened with a powerful anti-fascist adaptation of Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar, titled Caesar: Death of a Dictator and at the age of 23 he shocked the world over with War of the Worlds. All of these achievements led up to what is known as the greatest film contract ever written, one in which said he would provide two films to RKO Pictures both with complete creative control that means producing, cowriting, acting, and editing an unheard of and mocked notion at the time, especially for a new film director. He teamed up with writer Herman Mankiewicz, and Directory of Photography, Greg Tolland, one man had a vendetta the other, wanted to break new ground and that greatest of all-time contract, combined with two of Hollywood’s best behind the scenes men, they soon resulted in arguably the greatest film ever made, Citizen Kane. Citizen Kane follows a reporter on assignment to find out the meaning of the last word of the greatest media mogul in the 20th century, Charles Foster Kane, Rosebud. Our reporter visits both surviving and deceased mentors, partners, friends, and an ex-wife to figure out the placement of the last piece to the jigsaw that was Charles Foster Kane’s life. So sit back, relax, and watch out for any screaming cockatoos. You can purchase Citizen Kane here. Cinemallennials is a podcast where myself and another millennial are introduced to a classic film for the very first time ranging from the birth of cinema to the 1960s. Myself and my guest will open your eyes to the vast landscape of classic film as we discuss the films' performers,  their performances, those behind the camera, and how they and their films still influence our world today. Website: dlewmoviereview.com/ Social Media: Facebook: facebook.com/dlewmoviereviews/ Twitter: twitter.com/dlewmoviereview Instagram: @dlew88
51:21
December 02, 2020
Sullivan's Travels (1941)
On today’s episode, I talked with Aubrey Rieder who chose 1941’s Sullivan’s Travels, the comedic romp that isn’t just a comedy. Written and directed by wildly ahead of his time, playwright Preston Sturges, and starring Joel McCrea and the gorgeously tough Veronica Lake  Sullivan’s Travels follows the story of John L. Sullivan a multimillionaire director of comedy films like Ants in your Plants of 1941, and Hey Hey In the Hayloft who plans to make O Brother Where Art Thou? an epic that follows the social miseries of the day. When confronted about not having the life- experience of those miseries by his producers, Sullivan has a great idea that if he goes full method by dressing up and living amongst the downtrodden and the poor he’ll truly understand the subject of his film. That is until he arrives back in LA only hours later and discovers a down on her luck but practical actress and that’s where our rollicking adventure begins.  So sit back relax, and don’t forget the doughnuts You can purchase Sullivan's Travels here (P.S. Check out David Cairns' video essay on the DVD, Blu-Ray, or The Criterion Channel and tell him (@dcairns on Twitter) that Cinemallennials sent you.  Cinemallennials is a podcast where myself and another millennial are introduced to a classic film for the very first time ranging from the birth of cinema to the 1960s. Myself and my guest will open your eyes to the vast landscape of classic film as we discuss the films' performers,  their performances, those behind the camera, and how they and their films still influence our world today. Website: dlewmoviereview.com/ Social Media: Facebook: facebook.com/dlewmoviereviews/ Twitter: twitter.com/dlewmoviereview Instagram: @dlew88
51:48
November 18, 2020
The Immigrant (1917)
On today’s episode, I talked with my friend Mary Gallagher who picked the 1917 comedy short, The Immigrant starring Charlie Chaplin, Edna Purviance, and Eric Campbell. Chaplin didn’t just star in The Immigrant, he also produced, wrote, directed, composed the music, and edited the film. Charlie Chaplain was a comedic genius and is so influential if you’ve never heard his name or seen a film of his, you definitely know his look, the bowler hat, and the toothbrush mustache. Chaplin’s film career spanned 53 years beginning from 1914-1967 and is still impacting our culture today. If you know the song Smile, that's Chaplin, if you’ve seen the YouTube video called “The Greatest Speech Ever” that’s Chaplin, if you’ve seen The Joker, 9 of the films songs were composed by him. We will definitely be covering a lot of Chaplin’s greatest films in the future but for now, sit back, relax and see how Chaplin’s most famous character tramps his way to America. You can watch The Immigrant here Cinemallennials is a podcast where myself and another millennial are introduced to a classic film for the very first time ranging from the birth of cinema to the 1960s. Myself and my guest will open your eyes to the vast landscape of classic film as we discuss the films' performers,  their performances, those behind the camera, and how they and their films still influence our world today. Website: dlewmoviereview.com/ Social Media: Facebook: facebook.com/dlewmoviereviews/ Twitter: twitter.com/dlewmoviereview Instagram: @dlew88
20:01
November 04, 2020
Psycho (1960)
On today’s episode, I talked with Alex Wilson, the man who designed the brilliant logo you see on your screen. Alex picked 1960’s Psycho considered to be the origin and the inspiration for almost every modern horror film with director Alfred Hitchcock’s original themes, roles, and camera techniques that eventually became horror hallmarks for decades to come. Psycho follows the story of Marion Crane, a secretary at a real estate company in Phoenix Arizona who is hooking up with a California based pilot named Sam. When a moment to escape that life dull life and to be with her lover, presents itself, Marion takes it on the road. Instead of meeting Sam, she runs into trouble until she finds a backroad motel to shelter her from the storm, little does she know, an even bigger deluge is on the horizon. As per Hitchcock’s tradition, we will not be discussing certain moments or reveals (as people probably know them without knowing them and plus we want people to discover them while watching Psycho on their own. Yes, I know it’s a 60-year-old film.  This tradition goes back to when the film was first brought to theaters, he was one of the first and only directors to mandate a no late policy as people at the time would just walk in and out of movies whenever they felt like it and would wait until the film was over to see what they missed. So, sit back relax and don’t be too close to the shower. You can purchase Psycho here Cinemallennials is a podcast where myself and another millennial are introduced to a classic film for the very first time ranging from the birth of cinema to the 1960s. Myself and my guest will open your eyes to the vast landscape of classic film as we discuss the films' performers,  their performances, those behind the camera, and how they and their films still influence our world today. Website: dlewmoviereview.com/ Social Media: Facebook: facebook.com/dlewmoviereviews/ Twitter: twitter.com/dlewmoviereview Instagram: @dlew88
53:00
October 31, 2020
Rebecca (1940)
SPECIAL EPISODE ALERT! NETFLIX'S REBECCA EDITION Today’s episode is a very special one as not only do we have our first returning guest with Heather Reed coming back on the show, but the film we are looking at, Rebecca was just remade, by Netflix starring Lily James and Armie Hammer and is now available for all of us to watch. So after you listen to the show watch the new version on Netflix and tell us what you thought! Now I know I am bending my own rules a bit, but like I said, this is a very special occasion. Heather is the person that finally pressured me into not being intimidated by Hitchcock’s legacy of scares and thrills and to actually watch one and then two of his films over the next two days. Rebecca was Alfred Hitchcock’s first Hollywood picture and is the only film of his that won the Academy Award for Best Picture. Rebecca’s influence much like it’s titular character is often considered to be a shadow hanging over the new psychological thrillers director’s films like Villenueve, Fincher, and Ramsey. Rebecca follows the story of the eventual second Mrs.deWinter, a young naïve woman who falls in love with the rich, sophisticated and vastly complicated Maxim de Winter whose deceased ex-wife, Rebecca haunts his and consequently her daily life even when they return to the vast ancestral deWinter estate, Manderley What follows is a tale of hidden truths, distrustful help in the form of the housekeeper, Mrs.Danvers, and a terrible secret that is held over the second Mrs. deWinter. So sit back, relax, and don’t take advice from a housekeeper that doesn’t blink. After you listen to the show, check out the 1940 Rebecca we discussed, then check out Netflix's new Rebecca and let me know what you thought of them! Cinemallennials is a podcast where myself and another millennial are introduced to a classic film for the very first time ranging from the birth of cinema to the 1960s. Myself and my guest will open your eyes to the vast landscape of classic film as we discuss the films' performers,  their performances, those behind the camera, and how they and their films still influence our world today. Website: dlewmoviereview.com/ Social Media: Facebook: facebook.com/dlewmoviereviews/ Twitter: twitter.com/dlewmoviereview Instagram: @dlew88
51:55
October 21, 2020
The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari (1920)
On today’s episode, I talked with Frances Mulraney, a former colleague of mine who picked, The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari or in its original German, Das Kabinett des Dr. Caligari . Described as the first true horror film by Roger Ebert, and the precursor to arthouse films by Danny Peary, The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari is by far and away one of if not the most influential, and discussed silent film of all time. From its encapsulating German Expressionist atmosphere to featuring film’s very first ambiguous twist ending The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari has influenced not only the genres of horror, psychological thrillers, and film noir, but it also has been used as a muse for films like Metropolis, M, Battleship Potempkin, The Man Who Laughs, Dracula, Frankenstein, pretty much all of the works of Tim Burton, especially, Edward Scissorhands, and The Nightmare Before Christmas and even Martin Scorsese’s Shutter Island. As it is the 100th anniversary of the film's debut, it is the perfect time to get into it. The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari follows the story of Franzis, who tells the strange tale of how a mad psychiatrist brainwashed a young man who has slept walked for all of his 23 years to murder the ones Franzis loves the most, and his quest to stop them both only for the audience to later find out who our main character are really. So, sit back relax, and whatever you do, don’t ask anyone about the date you might die. You can purchase The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari here. Cinemallennials is a podcast where myself and another millennial are introduced to a classic film for the very first time ranging from the birth of cinema to the 1960s. Myself and my guest will open your eyes to the vast landscape of classic film as we discuss the films' performers,  their performances, those behind the camera, and how they and their films still influence our world today. Website: dlewmoviereview.com/ Social Media: Facebook: facebook.com/dlewmoviereviews/ Twitter: twitter.com/dlewmoviereview Instagram: @dlew88
45:14
October 07, 2020
A Trip to The Moon (1902)
On today’s episode, I talked with Olivia Dalessandro, who picked 1902’s, A Trip to the Moon or Le Voyage dans la Lune written, directed, and starring the one-man studio himself, Georges Méliès. Inspired by the writings of the godfather of science fiction, Jules Verne, Méliès is the first to bring science-fiction and fantasy to the silver screen.  Not only is he a pioneer in science-fiction, but he also popularized editing techniques like substitution splices, dissolves, time-lapses, and hand-painted colorization that enabled the growth of the science-fiction fantasy genre films we run to see on the big screen today. A Trip to the Moon follows the story of an expedition to the moon where astronomers and space marines encounter the vastness of space, The Man in the Moon, and even an alien race! So, sit back, relax, and enjoy the first ride to the final frontier. You can purchase A Trip to the Moon here Cinemallennials is a podcast where myself and another millennial are introduced to a classic film for the very first time ranging from the birth of cinema to the 1960s. Myself and my guest will open your eyes to the vast landscape of classic film as we discuss the films' performers,  their performances, those behind the camera, and how they and their films still influence our world today. Website: dlewmoviereview.com/ Social Media: Facebook: facebook.com/dlewmoviereviews/ Twitter: twitter.com/dlewmoviereview Instagram: @dlew88
35:30
September 23, 2020
The Passion of Joan of Arc (1928)
On today’s episode, I talked with Eric McDonough, otherwise known as Conservative Film Buff on Twitter, and Letterboxd. Eric picked 1928’s The Passion of Joan of Arc. Directed by Danish Francophile Carl Theodore Dreyer for the Société Générale des Films. Dreyer quite literally took his dialogue and scenery from the annals of history as he used the actual court minutes that were recorded by the members of the clergy that put Joan of Arc to the stake in May of 1431.  Fast-forwarding to 1927, Dreyer has immense pressure on him to create a masterpiece as French nationalism was at a peak, and Joan was officially named as a saint by the Catholic Church only years earlier, and he did just that. The Passion of Joan of Arc is known for its slower, but intense pacing, its revolutionary cinematography, the miraculous story of its survival as its lost negative was discovered in a mental institution in Norway, and of course its reputation for containing the greatest acting performance ever recorded. The Passion of Joan of Arc follows the last days of Jeanne d’Arc, a French peasant girl that stated Angels sent by God told her to unite and free France from English rule during the conflict we now know as the Hundred Years War. She accomplishes this through miraculously breaking the Siege of Orleans, securing the coronation city of Reims resulting in the coronation of King Charles VII all by leading from the front, as a teenager. She is eventually captured and ransomed to the English to be tried for heresy and this is where The Passion of Joan of Arc begins. So sit back relax and don't sign any abjurations. You can purchase The Passion of Joan of Arc here Cinemallennials is a podcast where myself and another millennial are introduced to a classic film for the very first time ranging from the birth of cinema to the 1960s. Myself and my guest will open your eyes to the vast landscape of classic film as we discuss the films' performers,  their performances, those behind the camera, and how they and their films still influence our world today. Website: dlewmoviereview.com/ Social Media: Facebook: facebook.com/dlewmoviereviews/ Twitter: twitter.com/dlewmoviereview Instagram: @dlew88
57:12
September 09, 2020
The Man Who Laughs (1928)
On today’s episode, I talked with actor Derrin Stull, who picked 1928’s The Man Who Laughs. You know when we were all kids and some of us including myself dressed up as what we were told were the classic Halloween costumes? Y’know like the Mummy, Frankenstein’s monster, Dracula? Well, our main character Gwynplaine should be held among them as The Man Who Laughs built the aesthetic foundation and stage upon which the Universal Picture Horror film series, its monsters, and the horror genre as a whole starred. Directed by German expressionist Paul Leni and starring horror actor progenitor Conrad Veidt alongside the very first scream queen herself Mary Philbin, The Man Who Laughs follows Gwynplaine a man who was horribly disfigured as a child and is sentenced to live his life with a permanent smile due to his father’s failed rebellion. His life is both cursed and blessed in childhood as he saves a baby girl named Deá who is blind, and both are then rescued by a kindly philosopher. They grow older, fall in love, and live happy lives despite the crowds that cruelly mock Gwynplaine until someone unveils his secret past. So, sit back, relax, and watch the smile that inspired one of film’s greatest villains, The Joker. You can purchase The Man Who Laughs here. Cinemallennials is a podcast where myself and another millennial are introduced to a classic film for the very first time ranging from the birth of cinema to the 1960s. Myself and my guest will open your eyes to the vast landscape of classic film as we discuss the films' performers,  their performances, those behind the camera, and how they and their films still influence our world today. Website: dlewmoviereview.com/ Social Media: Facebook: facebook.com/dlewmoviereviews/ Twitter: twitter.com/dlewmoviereview Instagram: @dlew88
48:03
August 26, 2020
M (1931)
   On today’s episode, I talked with Heather Reed, who picked 1931’s M or M: Eine Stadt zukt einen Morder, which was directed by Fritz Lang, and was written alongside his wife, Thea von Harbou who both worked together previously on his Dr. Mabuse series, the five-hour-long Die Nibelungen Saga, and possibly the most influential Science-Fiction film of all time, Metropolis. M starring Hollywood icon before he was one, Peter Lorre follows the story of Hans Beckert, a child murderer who is tracked down by both the German Authorities and the criminal underworld. M is considered to be the first in the serial killer slasher film genre. So sit back relax, and enjoy the show. You can purchase M here.     Cinemallennials is a podcast where myself and another millennial are introduced to a classic film for the very first time ranging from the birth of cinema to the 1960s. Myself and my guest will open your eyes to the vast landscape of classic film as we discuss the films' performers,  their performances, those behind the camera, and how they and their films still influence our world today. Website: dlewmoviereview.com/ Social Media: Facebook: facebook.com/dlewmoviereviews/ Twitter: twitter.com/dlewmoviereview Instagram: @dlew88
33:16
August 12, 2020
2001: A Space Odyssey (1968)
On today’s episode, I talked with my twin brother Tom about 1968’s 2001: A Space Odyssey directed by the legendary Stanley Kubrick. Due to its technical achievements in visual effects, its scientific accuracy, sound design, and how it approaches philosophy and life’s biggest questions, 2001: A Space Odyssey, is often considered to be the greatest film of all time.  After the release of Dr. Strangelove, Kubrick wanted to set out to make “the proverbial good science fiction film”.  Based on the short stories of one of the most-influential Science-Fiction writers of all time, Arthur C. Clarke, 2001 covers the length and breadth of time and space as our characters seek to discover the link between early and technologically advanced man. So, Sit back, relax, and open the pod bay doors to 2001: A Space Odyssey.  You can purchase 2001: A Space Odyssey here. Cinemallennials is a podcast where myself and another millennial are introduced to a classic film for the very first time ranging from the birth of cinema to the 1960s. Myself and my guest will open your eyes to the vast landscape of classic film as we discuss the films' performers,  their performances, those behind the camera, and how they and their films still influence our world today. Website: dlewmoviereview.com/ Social Media: Facebook: facebook.com/dlewmoviereviews/ Twitter: twitter.com/dlewmoviereview Instagram: @dlew88
47:05
July 29, 2020
Cinemallennials Trailer | Cinemallennialls
Welcome to Cinemallennials!  Cinemallennials is a podcast where myself and another millennial are introduced to a classic film for the very first time ranging from the birth of cinema to the 1960s. Myself and my guest will open your eyes to the vast landscape of classic film as we discuss the films' performers, their performances, those behind the camera and how they and their films still influence our world today.Cinemallennials is a podcast where myself and another millennial are introduced to a classic film for the very first time ranging from the birth of cinema to the 1960s. Myself and my guest will open your eyes to the vast landscape of classic film as we discuss the films' performers,  their performances, those behind the camera, and how they and their films still influence our world today. Website: dlewmoviereview.com/ Social Media: Facebook: facebook.com/dlewmoviereviews/ Twitter: twitter.com/dlewmoviereview Instagram: @dlew88
03:12
July 17, 2020