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Conservators Combating Climate Change

Conservators Combating Climate Change

By AIC's ECPN
Conservators Combatting Climate Change returns for a second season with co-host and founder Natalya Swanson joined by Marie Desrochers. In this season, Marie and Natalya focus on the intersectional nature of sustainability work by speaking with heritage and environmental conservators, educators, architects, and engineers about ongoing collaborative projects. Ten episodes will be released weekly in April and May 2021, so subscribe and tune in for a stimulating series of conversations about what it means to create an equitable, inclusive, and sustainable community.
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Season finale: updates and announcements
In the final episode, Marie and Natalya share reflections on creating season two, updates for future projects, and extend an invitation to join an informal Zoom meeting with some of Season Two's guest speakers on the 1st of July at 6:30EST. Zoom Meeting info: 1 July 2021, 6:30 EST https://udel.zoom.us/j/92262475667 Related content:  TheEthicsofCaring.com / natalya@udel.edu To share feedback or questions about this episode, please reach out at: ECPN.AIC.DigitalPlatforms@gmail.com
06:59
June 3, 2021
Ways to get involved with Caitlin Southwick
This mini-episode is for everyone who wants to get involved, but isn’t sure where to start. Natalya and Marie welcome Caitlin Southwick, Founder and Executive Director of Ki Culture and Sustainability in Conservation, to the program to talk about different conferences to attend, initiatives to follow, and organizations to get involved with. Resources: Museums for Future (#MFF) We Are Museums  Climate Heritage Network  Climate Reality Project COP 26 (Climate Change Conference of the Parties)  Curating Tomorrow - Henry McGhie Sustainable Museums - Sarah Sutton ICOM Working Group on Sustainability (webinar 21 April at 17.00 CET) Caitlin Southwick (caitlin@kiculture.org) is the Founder and Executive Director of Ki Culture and Sustainability in Conservation. She holds a Professional Doctorate in Conservation and Restoration of Cultural Heritage from the University of Amsterdam. Caitlin has worked in the conservation field in museums and sites around the world, including the Vatican Museums, The Getty Conservation Institute, The Uffizi Gallery, and Easter Island. She is the Secretary of the Working Group on Sustainability for the International Council of Museums (ICOM) and a former Professional Member of the American Institute of Conservation (AIC) Sustainability Committee. To share feedback on this content, please reach out to Natalya and Marie at: ECPN.AIC.digitalplatforms@gmail.com
13:02
May 27, 2021
Pt. 2: Environmental Conservation X Heritage Conservation with Dr. Rico and Dr. Ramenzoni
In the second half of a two-episode conversation, Marie and Natalya continue their discussion with Dr. Trinidad Rico and Dr. Victoria Ramenzoni about the ways in which heritage conservators, environmental conservators, and critical heritage professionals approach overlapping issues, such as balancing stakeholder needs. Victoria shares thoughts on the use of the term “restoration” when referring to landscape preservation and Trinidad contextualizes this notion in regards to preserving community monuments for the present. The speakers expand on the political nature of the way institutions define and interact with heritage and share advice on how to move forward collaboratively.  Full speaker bios:  Victoria Ramenzoni is an environmental anthropologist specialized in human behavioral ecology, community based approaches to conservation, and marine and coastal policies. Through a combination of qualitative and quantitative methods, she studies how socio-ecological factors shape communities adaptation to climate change and extreme events, the impact of environmental uncertainty on decisions about resource use among coastal households, and the development of more inclusive participatory policies for coastal environments. Her work is concentrated in Indonesia (Flores and Kalimantan), Cuba, and the U.S. where she recently studied the impacts of COVID across northeastern fisheries. Dr. Ramenzoni received a BA in Anthropology from the Universidad de Buenos Aires, and a Ph.D. from the University of Georgia Department of Anthropology in 2014. She was awarded a prestigious Knauss Marine Policy Fellowship with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, where she served for over a year and a half in the integration of social science methods across the agency. After working as an Associate Research Scientist and International Engagement Officer at the Harte Research Institute, Texas A&M-Corpus Christi, for over three years, Dr. Ramenzoni joined the Department of Human Ecology at Rutgers University in 2018 as an Assistant Professor in Marine Policy.  Trinidad Rico is Associate Professor and Director of the Cultural Heritage and Preservation Studies Program in the department of art history at Rutgers University, but this year she is an ACLS Burkhardt Fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University. At Rutgers, she is also Associate Graduate Faculty in the departments of anthropology, landscape architecture, history, georgraphy, and the school of planning and public policy, which reflects the interdisciplinary nature and impact of her work. Dr Rico holds a BA in Archaeology from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Principles of Conservation from University College London, and a PhD in Anthropology from Stanford University. Her work examines the global rise of heritage industries, its civil societies, and discourses, and she is currently writing a monograph about cultures of preservation across the Muslim world.  To share feedback on this content, please reach out to Natalya and Marie at: ECPN.AIC.digitalplatforms@gmail.com
31:42
May 20, 2021
Pt. 1: Environmental Conservation X Heritage Conservation with Dr. Rico and Dr. Ramenzoni
In the first of a two part episode, Natalya and Marie talk to two professors at Rutgers University, Dr. Trinidad Rico and Dr. Victoria Ramenzoni, about the overlap in heritage and environmental conservation. Victoria shares her thoughts on the complexity of defining and creating sustainable protocols, Trinidad reflects on how her early training in art conservation affects her current practice in critical heritage studies, and Marie and Natalya reflect on highlights of their two answers. Full speaker bios: Victoria Ramenzoni is an environmental anthropologist specialized in human behavioral ecology, community based approaches to conservation, and marine and coastal policies. Through a combination of qualitative and quantitative methods, she studies how socio-ecological factors shape communities adaptation to climate change and extreme events, the impact of environmental uncertainty on decisions about resource use among coastal households, and the development of more inclusive participatory policies for coastal environments. Her work is concentrated in Indonesia (Flores and Kalimantan), Cuba, and the U.S. where she recently studied the impacts of COVID across northeastern fisheries. Dr. Ramenzoni received a BA in Anthropology from the Universidad de Buenos Aires, and a Ph.D. from the University of Georgia Department of Anthropology in 2014. She was awarded a prestigious Knauss Marine Policy Fellowship with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, where she served for over a year and a half in the integration of social science methods across the agency. After working as an Associate Research Scientist and International Engagement Officer at the Harte Research Institute, Texas A&M-Corpus Christi, for over three years, Dr. Ramenzoni joined the Department of Human Ecology at Rutgers University in 2018 as an Assistant Professor in Marine Policy. Trinidad Rico is Associate Professor and Director of the Cultural Heritage and Preservation Studies Program in the department of art history at Rutgers University, but this year she is an ACLS Burkhardt Fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University. At Rutgers, she is also Associate Graduate Faculty in the departments of anthropology, landscape architecture, history, georgraphy, and the school of planning and public policy, which reflects the interdisciplinary nature and impact of her work. Dr Rico holds a BA in Archaeology from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Principles of Conservation from University College London, and a PhD in Anthropology from Stanford University. Her work examines the global rise of heritage industries, its civil societies, and discourses, and she is currently writing a monograph about cultures of preservation across the Muslim world. To share feedback on this content, please reach out to Natalya and Marie at: ECPN.AIC.digitalplatforms@gmail.com
28:48
May 13, 2021
Decolonizing conservation practice with Nylah Byrd
In this episode, Marie and Natalya speak with Nylah Byrd, Graduate Fellow in Objects Conservation at the Winterthur/University of Delaware Program in Art Conservation, about a challenging topic with no easy answers: what it means to decolonize conservation practice. Nylah shares her thoughts on the alternative idea of indigenizing something, and how this has manifested in her work as a Graduate Fellow. Please join us for a free virtual conversation about how to embed intersectional environmentalism into heritage conservation practice on 6 May 2021 @ 6.00EDT: https://www.manacontemporary.com/event/intersectional-environmentalism-in-heritage-conservation/ To share feedback on this content, please reach out to Natalya and Marie at: ECPN.AIC.digitalplatforms@gmail.com
14:26
May 6, 2021
Community-conscious conservation practice with Michael Henry, Dale Kronkright, and Pita Lopez
In this episode, Natalya and Marie are joined by Michael Henry, Dale Kronkright, and Pita Judy Lopez about their collaborative work with the Georgia O'Keeffe Museum and Foundation and how they have leveraged institutional resources and mandates to support local community needs. This episode also explores the overlap and integration of traditional knowledge into modern conservation practice and the capacity for technical conservation practice to have impact beyond institutional boundaries. Related links: Mana Contemporary panel discussion on intersectional environmentalism - Thursday 6 May 2021, 6.00EDT https://www.manacontemporary.com/event/intersectional-environmentalism-in-heritage-conservation/ Discovering the Challenges Facing the Preservation of O'Keeffe's Historic Home and Studio in Abiquiu, New Mexico - presentation by Dale Kronkrirght https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L--QuHB0fAM&feature=youtu.be&ab_channel=GeorgiaO%27KeeffeMuseum Interview with Pita Lopez https://www.newmexico.org/nmmagazine/articles/post/pita-lopez/ Acequia irrigation in New Mexico https://www.nationalgeographic.com/environment/article/acequias Scattergood Design’s page on the Abiquiú O’Keeffe House project- The multi-disciplinary team is led by Pamela W. Hawkes FAIA of Scattergood Design and Michael C. Henry PE AIA of Watson & Henry Associates, and core teams members include: Peter Aaslestad, Aaslestad Preservation Consulting, photogrammetry and three-dimensional imagery;  Anthony Crosby, adobe conservation;  Michael Schuller and Dave Woodham, Atkinson-Noland & Associates, structural engineers; and Dorothy Krotzer, Building Conservation Associates, finishes conservation. https://scattergooddesign.com/project/georgia-okeeffe-house-and-studio/ To share feedback on this content, please reach out to Natalya and Marie at: ECPN.AIC.digitalplatforms@gmail.com
43:31
April 29, 2021
Prioritizing inclusivity in conservation with Dr. Joelle Wickens
In this mini-episode, Natalya and Marie are joined by Dr. Joelle Wickens, Assistant Professor of Preventive Conservation and Associate Director of the Winterthur/University of Delaware Program in Art Conservation. Joelle explains why inclusivity/equity are critical to practicing heritage conservation sustainably and what it means to broaden how we interpret heritage - and by extension - our professional responsibility and  educational priorities.
13:01
April 22, 2021
The value of interdisciplinary collaboration with Sarah Nunberg, Sarah Sutton, and Sarah Sanchez
In this episode, Marie and Natalya are joined by Sustainability Consultant Sarah Sutton, Objects conservator Sarah Nunberg, and Engineering PhD student Sarah Sanches to discuss their cross-disciplinary, NEH-funded Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) project. This refreshingly positive episode also includes reflections on advancing environmental justice, how locality affects how we understand living sustainably, and the persistence needed to “get a seat at the table, and some practical suggestions about working mindfully. Related links: Arts Funders Forum | Art for Environment: How Can Cultural Philanthropy Help Solve Climate Change https://www.chicagogallerynews.com/events/arts-funders-forum-art-for-environment-how-can-cultural-philanthropy-help-solve-climate-change American Institute for Conservation and the Foundation for Advancement in Conservation | Life Cycle Assessment https://www.culturalheritage.org/about-us/foundation/programs/life-cycle-analysis Sustainable Museums | Asking for 50% or better by 2030 for the US Nationally Determined Contribution https://sustainablemuseums.net/author/bmuse216/ Helen Frankenthaler Foundation | Grants: Frankenthaler Climate Initiative https://www.frankenthalerfoundation.org/grants America is All In https://www.americaisallin.com/
45:21
April 15, 2021
Intersectional environmentalism with Maribel Cosme-Vitagliani
In this mini-episode, Natalya and Marie speak with Maribel Cosme-Vitagliani about what intersectional environmentalism is and why it’s necessary for equitable and inclusive sustainability work. Maribel shares some of the ways that she has embedded environmental justice in her work as the conservation departmental assistant at the Brooklyn Museum. To share feedback on this content, please reach out to Natalya and Marie at: ECPN.AIC.digitalplatforms@gmail.com This podcast is sponsored by the American Institute for Conservation’s Emerging Conservation Professionals Network and it is generously supported by the Department of Art conservation at the University of Delaware in honor of Bruno Pouliot.
12:47
April 8, 2021
Teaching sustainable conservation with Marina Herriges
In this episode, hosts Natalya Swanson and Marie Desrochers speak with Marina Herriges about what sustainability means to her as a recent graduate, textile conservator in private practice, and guest visiting lecturer in environmental sustainability at the Centre for Textile Conservation at the University of Glasgow. Marina shares her insight in raising awareness about intersectional environmentalism and its potential for heritage conservation.  To share feedback on this content, please reach out to Natalya and Marie at: ECPN.AIC.digitalplatforms@gmail.com Marina Herriges Bio Marina graduated in Art, Conservation and Restoration at the Portuguese Catholic University, Portugal, in 2016. She obtained a master’s degree in Conservation of Cultural Heritage at the Universitat Politécnica de Valéncia, Spain, in 2018. She completed an MPhil in Textile Conservation, from the University of Glasgow in 2020. Marina has worked in a range of different heritage and conservation organizations in Brazil, Portugal, Spain and the United Kingdom. She researched environmental sustainability for her dissertation, which led to developing a project with the students at the Centre for Textile Conservation at the University of Glasgow. Marina has also worked at the Sustainability in Conservation NGO. This podcast is sponsored by the American Institute for Conservation’s Emerging Conservation Professionals Network and it is generously supported by the Department of Art conservation at the University of Delaware in honor of Bruno Pouliot.
36:42
April 1, 2021
Season two trailer
Conservators Combating Climate Change returns for a second season with co-host and founder Natalya Swanson joined by Marie Desrochers. In this season, Marie and Natalya focus on the intersectional nature of sustainability work by speaking with heritage and environmental conservators, educators, architects, and engineers about ongoing collaborative projects. Ten episodes will be released weekly in April and May 2021, so subscribe and tune in for a stimulating series of conversations about what it means to create an equitable, inclusive, and sustainable community.  Contact Natalya and Marie with feedback or questions at ECPN.AIC.DigitalPlatforms@gmail.com This podcast is sponsored by the American Institute for Conservation’s Emerging Conservation Professionals Network and it is generously supported by the Department of Art conservation at the University of Delaware in honor of Bruno Pouliot.
03:02
March 25, 2021
Season Wrap-Up: Recognizing and Embracing Agency
In the final episode of the season, hosts Natalya Swanson and Emma Hartman are joined by Marie Desrochers, incoming host and AIC-ECPN Digital Platform Officer, to reflect on what they have learned since starting the podcast.  Have thoughts or feedback on the content? Want to share a sustainability/climate and cultural heritage story with us? Contact us at: ecpn.aic.digitalplatforms@gmail.com and/or send us a voice message by clicking the "message" button on our homepage, https://anchor.fm/conservatorscombatingcc. If you're willing, we may feature you in a future episode of the podcast! Support for this podcast series is generously provided by the University of Delaware's Department of Art Conservation in honor of Bruno Pouliot.
16:23
August 7, 2020
Forming coalitions with Kate Fugett
In this episode, Emma and Natalya speak candidly with Kate Fugett, Objects Conservator at the American Museum of Natural History, about the coalition of conservation, collection, and museum professionals she is actively forming. We discuss a broad range of topics related to community engagement and share practical advice gained from our personal experiences attempting to enact change at our respective institutions.  If you are interested in joining Kate in her goal to create a more sustainable and equitable future, please get in contact with her at Kate.Fugett@gmail.com.  Learn more about initiatives we mention in this episode:  ACT labels (https://act.mygreenlab.org); the NEH Life Cycle Assessment Project (https://www.google.com/amp/s/sustainablemuseums.net/2019/01/15/planning-an-lca-library-for-cultural-heritage-professionals/amp/); STASH C (https://stashc.com); Stemming the Tide symposium recordings (https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL7gn_68Hr4h-fIGqC-xRM6GnZTkqajDHL); Sustainable Development Goals (https://sdgs.un.org/goals) Have thoughts or feedback on the content? Want to share a sustainability/climate and cultural heritage story with us? Contact us at: ecpn.aic.digitalplatforms@gmail.com and/or send us a voice message by clicking the "message" button on our homepage, https://anchor.fm/conservatorscombatingcc. If you're willing, we may feature you in a future episode of the podcast!   Support for this podcast series is generously provided by the University of Delaware's Department of Art Conservation in honor of Bruno Pouliot.
38:01
July 24, 2020
Collaborating with Indigenous Communities with Francis Lukezic
In this episode, Emma and Natalya talk with Francis Lukezic, Objects Conservator at the Maryland Archaeological Conservation Laboratory about her involvement in the Nunalleq Archaeological Excavation, a pre-contact Yup’ik site in Southwest Alaska. In this episode we talk about how challenging it is to take care of collections, whether in remote areas like southwest Alaska or in Maryland; the many benefits of collaborative projects; and how cultural heritage workers can help empower indigenous peoples to feel comfortable caring for their collection autonomously. Resources: Nunalleq 2019 blog: An archaeological adventure by the Bering Sea Nunalleq: Stories from the Village of Our Ancestors. A free interactive educational resource  Children of the Dig. A film by Joshua Albeza Branstetter (Branstetter Film) Hillerdal, Charlotta, Rick Knecht, and Warren Jones. 2019. “Nunalleq: Archaeology, Climate Change, and Community Engagement in a Yup'ik Village.” Arctic Anthro. 56:4-17. DOI: 10.3368/aa.56.1.4 Mossolova, Anna and Rick Knecht. 2019. “Bridging Past and Present: A Study of Precontact Yupik Masks from the Nunalleq Site, Alaska” Arctic Anthro. 56:18-38. DOI: 10.3368/aa.56.1.18 Have thoughts or feedback on the content? Want to share a sustainability/climate and cultural heritage story with us? Contact us at: ecpn.aic.digitalplatforms [at] gmail [dot] com and/or send us a voice message by clicking the "message" button on our homepage, https://anchor.fm/conservatorscombatingcc. If you're willing, we may feature you in a future episode of the podcast! Support for this podcast series is generously provided by the University of Delaware's Department of Art Conservation in honor of Bruno Pouliot.
20:05
July 3, 2020
Why Climate Justice = Social Justice
In this special mini-episode, Natalya talks about the interconnectedness of social and climate justice. She provides facts about how black and brown communities are being affected by the effects of the changing climate and responses to natural- and human-induced disasters. She ends with an optional pathway forward within the equitable green economy inspired by the NAACP's 2010 Climate Justice Initiative toolkit.   Recommended reading:   Climate and Social Justice  Climate Change is a Social Justice Issue  BlackLivesMatter, Criminalization, and Disaster Justice  Climate is the Newest Gentrifying Force, and its Effects are Already Reshaping Cities  Fumes Across the Fence-Line: The Health Impacts of Air Pollution from Oil & Gas Facilities on African American Communities  Baltimore neighborhood identified as 'ground zero' for local effects of climate crisis  Green Collar Workers: An Emerging Workforce in the Environmental Sector  No, climate action can't be separated from social justice
08:13
June 12, 2020
Graduate Studies and Sustainability with Maddie Cooper
In this episode, we talk with Maddie Cooper, Graduate Fellow at the Winterthur/University of Delaware in Art Conservation about how her pre-program experiences in South Florida shaped her decision to specialize in Preventive Conservation and how she has curated her graduate school experience to focus in disaster planning and response.  Resources: University of Delaware's Disaster Research Center Climate Change for Cultural Institutions: What you need to know Infographic NOAHS ARK Have thoughts or feedback on the content? Want to share a sustainability/climate and cultural heritage story with us? Contact us at: ecpn.aic.digitalplatforms [at] gmail [dot] com and/or send us a voice message by clicking the "message" button on our homepage, https://anchor.fm/conservatorscombatingcc. If you're willing, we may feature you in a future episode of the podcast! Support for this podcast series is generously provided by the University of Delaware's Department of Art Conservation in honor of Bruno Pouliot.
25:50
May 28, 2020
Crafting a More Sustainable Future with Henry McGhie
In this episode, we welcome Henry McGhie, bird ecologist, former head of the Manchester Museum’s curatorial team, and principal of the consultancy Curating Tomorrow, to discuss sustainability, climate change, and taking action in museum/cultural heritage spaces.  Curating Tomorrow  About the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals  Henry’s Museums and the Sustainable Development Goals Guide  Have thoughts or feedback on the content? Contact us at: ecpn.aic.digitalplatforms [at] gmail [dot] com. Support for this podcast series is generously provided by the University of Delaware's Department of Art Conservation in honor of Bruno Pouliot.
38:22
May 14, 2020
Episode 0: Introduction to the series
Introduction to the American Institute for Conservation's Emerging Conservation Professionals Network's new podcast series, "Conservators Combating Climate Change" by hosts Emma Hartman and Natalya Swanson.   Contact us at: ecpn.aic.digitalplatforms [at] gmail [dot] com.  Resources  Read AIC's Position Statement on Climate Change.  Check out AIC's Sustainability and Emergency Committees, and the excellent work they're doing to address the climate crisis.  For closed captioning, please listen on AIC's YouTube channel. Support for this podcast series is generously provided by the Department of Art Conservation at the University of Delaware in honor of Bruno Pouliot. 
05:42
April 21, 2020