Skip to main content
Say More on That

Say More on That

By Hilary A Matfess
A podcast where academics discuss their policy relevant work (and coffee preferences).
Listen on
Where to listen
Breaker Logo

Breaker

Google Podcasts Logo

Google Podcasts

Pocket Casts Logo

Pocket Casts

RadioPublic Logo

RadioPublic

Spotify Logo

Spotify

Currently playing episode

Episode One: Dr. Danielle Gilbert and the Oxygen of Publicity

Say More on That

1x
Episode 13: Noor Ali on 'the right mug' and narratives of Muslim American Youth.
Dr. Noor Ali is the principal at Al-Hamra Academy, Shrewsbury, MA and has been a veteran teacher of fifteen years in elementary and middle school grades. She is an assistant professor at Worcester State University and Arizona State University. Noor is actively engaged in efforts towards social justice, inter-faith dialogue, community networking, and youth development. She served as a Board Member on the Shrewsbury Youth and Family Services. Noor earned her Ed.D. in Curriculum, Teaching, Learning, and Leadership from Northeastern University. Inspired by social justice in education, her dissertation was titled Space Making and Voice Finding for the Narrative of Muslim American Youth. She holds an MS Ed. in Inclusion Education from the University of New England and was the valedictorian for her MA in Literature in English. She is a member of the Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Taskforce for her town and district schools.
32:51
May 26, 2021
Episode 12: John Taden on Electoral Petitions and Smooth Landings
John Taden is a doctoral candidate in Public Policy and Political Economy at the School of Economic, Political, and Policy Sciences at the University of Texas at Dallas. He also has a Master of Science in Social Data Analytics and Research from the same school and a Master's in Business Administration from the Texas A&M University, Commerce. John was born and raised in Ghana where he had his Bachelor of Science from the Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology. He regularly grants TV and radio interviews to TV and radio stations in Ghana on public policy issues of interest, including on taxes, national debt, and elections. John Taden is also passionate about mob justice attitudes in Africa. He currently runs a campaign to end the practice of mob justice and was invited to give a Ted Talk about mob justice in 2019. John has recently accepted an offer as Assistant Professor of International Studies at Pepperdine University.
32:01
May 12, 2021
Episode 11: Julia Zulver on "High Risk Feminism" and Spelling
Dr Zulver is a Marie Skłodowska-Curie Research Fellow at the Oxford School of Global and Area Studies. She is currently based at the Instituto de Investigaciones Jurídicas at the UNAM in Mexico City (2020-2022). Her project — “High Risk Leadership in Latin America” — focuses on women’s leadership in the pursuit of gender justice in various violent contexts. She earned her DPhil in Sociology at the University of Oxford in 2018, where she studied how and why organisations of women mobilise in high risk contexts, actions which expose them to further danger. Her doctoral project focused on Colombia, while her master’s project examined similar themes in El Salvador. Her work has been published in Gender and Development, Gender, Place & Culture, and Latin American Perspectives. She has also contributed to The Washington Post, The Guardian, openDemocracy, and Ms. Magazine, among others. Keep an eye out for her new book!
28:53
April 28, 2021
Episode Ten: Christine Slaughter on Racial Resilience and the Best Serif Fonts
Christine Marie Slaughter is a PhD Candidate in the Department of Political Science at the University of California, Los Angeles, and is expected to defend her dissertation in June 2021. Her dissertation, “No Strangers to Hardship”: African Americans, Inequality and the Politics of Resilience, develops a theory and measurement of “racial resilience”. Christine’s primary research interests include political behavior and political psychology, race and ethnicity politics, and poverty. The second stream of research specifically focuses on Black women voters and intersectionality. Christine’s dissertation is currently supported by the Ford Foundation Dissertation Fellowship (2020), Institute of American Cultures and the Ralph J. Bunche Center for African American Studies at UCLA (2020), and the APSA/ National Science Foundation Dissertation Development and Improvement Grant (2020). Christine holds a MA in Political Science from UCLA. Prior to UCLA, she graduated with a BA in Political Science and Comparative Women's Studies from Spelman College, a historically Black women’s college in Atlanta, Georgia. She is a former UNCF/Mellon Mays Undergraduate Fellow.
22:10
April 14, 2021
*FULL EPISODE* Episode Nine: Renée Marlin-Bennett on Chopped Liver and Mean Memes
Not sure why anchor keeps cutting off the last 6 minutes of my uploads, but I'll work on it! Professor Renée Marlin-Bennett researches global problems involving information and how it flows, borders, bodies, and power.  From these points of departure, she ventures into international theory, pragmatism, international political sociology, and global political economy.  Much of her previous work has explored the evolution of rules that order global practices as well as those that provide the basis for disorder.  She has examined substantive areas such as trade, intellectual property, information, and privacy  to examine how contestation, rhetorical frames, and path dependence contribute to development of global orders. Her current research on global problems focuses on instances of power and how they can congeal into governance or disruption of governance.  Much of her work now looks to the Internet and global sites within cyberspace as opportunities for complicating our understanding of the practices of global politics in the Information Age.  She also researches the relation between the embodied human and these global practices and the politics of borders, understood broadly.
28:56
April 1, 2021
Episode Nine: Renée Marlin-Bennett on Chopped Liver and Mean Memes
Professor Renée Marlin-Bennett researches global problems involving information and how it flows, borders, bodies, and power.  From these points of departure, she ventures into international theory, pragmatism, international political sociology, and global political economy.  Much of her previous work has explored the evolution of rules that order global practices as well as those that provide the basis for disorder.  She has examined substantive areas such as trade, intellectual property, information, and privacy  to examine how contestation, rhetorical frames, and path dependence contribute to development of global orders. Her current research on global problems focuses on instances of power and how they can congeal into governance or disruption of governance.  Much of her work now looks to the Internet and global sites within cyberspace as opportunities for complicating our understanding of the practices of global politics in the Information Age.  She also researches the relation between the embodied human and these global practices and the politics of borders, understood broadly.
22:55
March 31, 2021
Episode Eight: Anwar Mhajne on Digital Colonialism, International Humanitarian Law in Cyberspace, and Hummus
Anwar Mhajne is  an Assistant Professor of Political Science at Stonehill College. Her research focuses on Feminist International Relations and Security Studies; Democratization; Governance and Institutions; Civil Society and Activism; Political Islam; Middle East; Gender Politics; Social Movements; and Regime Change. Her work has been featured in The International Feminist Journal of Politics, Political Research Quarterly​, Religion and Politics, Foreign Policy, The Conversation, Times of Israel, Haaretz, Middle East Eye, +972 Magazine, Quartz, The Defense Post, The Jerusalem Post, and Carnegie Endowment for International Peace
15:38
March 17, 2021
Episode Seven: Joe Young on Tortured Logic and Breakfast Rituals
Joseph (Joe) Young Professor, School of International Service and School of Public Affairs, American University My research examines the causes and consequences of state and dissident violence. I’ve published peer-reviewed articles across academic disciplines, including political science, economics, criminology, and international studies. I’ve been invited to speak to organizations in the defense community and have consulted on a Department of Defense initiative focusing on countering violent extremism as well as done an impact evaluation of violence reduction programs in Colombia for USAID. The National Science Foundation and the National Consortium for the Study of Terrorism and Responses to Terrorism (START) have funded my research. Erin Kearns is currently an Assistant Professor in the Department of Criminology & Criminal Justice at the University of Alabama. Starting in Fall 2021, she will join the School of Criminology & Criminal Justice and the NCITE CoE at the University of Nebraska Omaha. Her primary research seeks to understand the relationship among terrorism, media, law enforcement, and the public. Her publications include articles on why groups lie about terrorism, media coverage of terrorism and counterterrorism, public perceptions of terrorism and counterterrorism practices, and relationships between communities and law enforcement. Her work has been funded through a number of sources, including the National Consortium for the Study of and Responses to Terrorism (START) and featured on numerous media outlets including CNN, The Economist, NPR, the Washington Post, and Vox. She serves on the editorial boards of Criminal Justice & Behavior, Studies in Conflict and Terrorism and Dynamics of Asymmetric Conflict and has served as a consultant for the Police Foundation and the Department of Justice's Office of Community Oriented Policing.
14:11
March 3, 2021
*FULL EPISODE* Episode Six: Gary Winslett on Cappuccinos and 'Competitiveness and Death' in international trade
Apologies! It appears only half of our conversation uploaded originally. This is the full episode. Gary Winslett is an Assistant Professor of Political Science at Middlebury College. He did a postdoctoral fellowship at the European University Institute in Florence and received his Ph.D. from Boston College in 2016. He was the first in his family to attend college and graduated from the University of Florida in 2009. His first book, Competitiveness and Death: Trade and Politics in Cars, Beef, and Drugs, comes out in March. He enjoys skiing, hiking, and board games with his wife Becky and his daughter Adelaide.
34:55
February 18, 2021
Episode Six: Gary Winslett on Cappuccinos and 'Competitiveness and Death' in international trade
Gary Winslett is an Assistant Professor of Political Science at Middlebury College. He did a postdoctoral fellowship at the European University Institute in Florence and received his Ph.D. from Boston College in 2016. He was the first in his family to attend college and graduated from the University of Florida in 2009. His first book, Competitiveness and Death: Trade and Politics in Cars, Beef, and Drugs, comes out in March. He enjoys skiing, hiking, and board games with his wife Becky and his daughter Adelaide.
14:34
February 17, 2021
Episode Five: Gabriella Gricius on the "Scramble for the Artic," traditional ecological knowledge, and planners.
Gabriella Gricius is a Ph.D. Student and Graduate Teaching Assistant at Colorado State University in the subfields of International Relations, Environmental Policy, and Comparative Politics. She is also a Graduate Fellow at the North American and Arctic Security & Defence Network (NAADSN) with Trent University. Her research focuses on Arctic politics, critical security and decolonial theory as well as Russian foreign policy in the Arctic. She also writes for a variety of online publications including Foreign Policy, Global Security Review, the European Leadership Network, Responsible Statecraft, and Riddle Russia amongst many others. She is fluent in English and German and has working proficiency in Dutch and Russian. For the last year, Gabriella worked as the Director of Research for The International Scholar, a project aimed at introducing 80+ young scholars to research in International Relations. Prior to that, she acted as a Senior Research Associate for the Public International Law and Policy Group’s Amsterdam (PILPG-NL) office for three years.
14:57
February 3, 2021
Episode Four: Calla Hummel (and her puppy!) on informal workers and passive voice
Calla Hummel is an assistant professor in the University of Miami’s Department of Political Science. She studies when and why informal workers organize and the impacts that the world’s 2 billion informal workers have on local and national politics. She is also tracking COVID-19 policy responses as the Bolivia team leader with the University of Miami's Observatory for the Containment of COVID-19 in the Americas. Calla uses statistical, ethnographic, survey, computational, and formal methods. She conducts research with street vendor unions in La Paz, Bolivia and São Paulo, Brazil. Her research has been published in BJPS, CPS, LAPS, and LARR, among others, and supported by grants from the National Science Foundation, the Department of Education, and the University of Miami, among others. She received her PhD from the Department of Government at the University of Texas at Austin.
28:14
January 20, 2021
Episode Three: Anna Meier on Terrorist Designation and Tofu
Anna Meier is a PhD candidate at the University of Wisconsin–Madison, where she is also a Law & Society graduate fellow with the University of Wisconsin Law School. She studies how governments construct the concept of "terrorism" and formulate national security policy in response. Her research has received support from the Jean Monnet European Union Center of Excellence at UW–Madison and the Wisconsin Project on International Relations, and is published or forthcoming in International Studies Quarterly, The Oxford Handbook of Behavioral Political Science, Lawfare, Political Violence at a Glance, and The Washington Post. Anna is also an activist with the Teaching Assistants' Association, UW–Madison's graduate labor union, and has worked on issues of equity and justice in the academy at the local and national levels. Prior to grad school, Anna worked in Washington, DC for the START Consortium and the Project On Government Oversight. She holds a master's degree in political science from UW–Madison and bachelor's degrees in international relations and modern languages from Knox College.
19:27
January 6, 2021
Episode Two: Max Margulies and Conscription's Effect on Conflict Initiation
Dr. Max Margulies is the Director of Research and an Assistant Professor at the Modern War Institute at West Point. He also serves as the course director for the thesis and capstone programs in West Point’s Defense and Strategic Studies program, which includes a required course on research design. Prior to joining MWI, he was a faculty member in West Point’s Department of Social Sciences, where he taught classes on international affairs and served as Executive Director of the Rupert H. Johnson Grand Strategy Program from July 2018- July 2020. In addition to his primary interests in military personnel policies, innovation, and effectiveness, he also studies and writes broadly on civil-military relations, strategy, and conflict. His writing has appeared in War on the Rocks, Lawfare, and the Washington Post’s Monkey Cage. He holds a PhD in Political Science from the University of Pennsylvania, an MA in Political Science from Columbia University, and a BA in Political Science from McGill University. The views expressed are personal, and do not necessarily reflect those of the Department of Defense, the U.S. Army, the U.S. Military Academy or any other department or agency of the U.S. government.
19:01
December 23, 2020
Episode One: Dr. Danielle Gilbert and the Oxygen of Publicity
On this Episode, we talk with Dr. Dani Gilbert about her article, "The Oxygen of Publicity," available here: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/1057610X.2020.1792723 Dr.  Gilbert is an Assistant Professor of Military & Strategic Studies at the United States Air Force Academy. Since 2015, she has served as a fellow with the Bridging the Gap Project, which supports scholars in contributing to public debates by producing and disseminating policy-relevant scholarship. You can follow her on Twitter, @_danigilbert.  
22:34
December 9, 2020
Introduction to "Say More on That"
A podcast for academics doing policy-relevant research. 
00:40
December 4, 2020