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Holy Crap, How'd They Do That?

Holy Crap, How'd They Do That?

By Doc and The Cop
Have you ever asked yourself, "Holy crap, how'd they do that?" Dr Loren Murfield and Pat Lynch take on disruptive thinking and give you the answers to that questions and much more.

Dr. Loren Murfield is a former college professor who works with business leaders small and large to do what they never thought possible. Pat Lynch is a retired police supervisor from a large metropolitan department, now partnering with motivated Florida real estate agents looking to stand out above the rest. Together, they're "Doc and the Cop" and they're here to help you think bigger and reach higher!
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118 The Moon Landing

Holy Crap, How'd They Do That?

118 The Moon Landing

Holy Crap, How'd They Do That?

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118 The Moon Landing
Holy Crap Accomplishment: 1969 NASA Moon Landing In 1966, after five years of work by an international team of scientists and engineers, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) conducted the first unmanned Apollo mission, testing the structural integrity of the proposed launch vehicle and spacecraft combination. July 16: blast off. July 19: after traveling 240,000 miles in 76 hours, Apollo 11 entered into a lunar orbit. July 20: at 1:46 p.m., the lunar module Eagle, manned by Armstrong and Aldrin, separated from the command module, where Collins remained. Two hours later, the Eagle began its descent to the lunar surface. July 20: 4:17 p.m. the craft touched down on the southwestern edge of the Sea of Tranquility. Armstrong immediately radioed to Mission Control in Houston, Texas, a now-famous message: "The Eagle has landed." July 20: 10:39 p.m., five hours ahead of the original schedule, Armstrong opened the hatch of the lunar module. As he made his way down the module's ladder, a television camera attached to the craft recorded his progress and beamed the signal back to Earth, where hundreds of millions watched in great anticipation. July 20: 10:56 p.m., as Armstrong stepped off the ladder and planted his foot on the moon’s powdery surface, he spoke his famous quote, which he later contended was slightly garbled by his microphone and meant to be "that's one small step for a man, one giant leap for mankind." July 20: 11:15 pm Aldrin joined him on the moon's surface, and together they took photographs of the terrain, planted a U.S. flag, ran a few simple scientific tests and spoke with President Richard Nixon (1913-94) via Houston. July 21: 1:11 a.m., both astronauts were back in the lunar module and the hatch was closed. The two men slept that night on the surface of the moon. July 21: 1:54 p.m. the Eagle began its ascent back to the command module. Among the items left on the surface of the moon was a plaque that read: "Here men from the planet Earth first set foot on the moon—July 1969 A.D.—We came in peace for all mankind." July 21: 5:35 p.m., Armstrong and Aldrin successfully docked and rejoined Collins. July 22: 12:56 a.m. Apollo 11 began its journey home. July 24: 12:50 pm safely splashing down in the Pacific Ocean . Holy Crap Thinking Outrageous Goal. JFK issues challenge in 1961. Sometimes politics pushes us faster or farther than we would go on our own. "We would either land on the moon, we would crash attempting to land, or we would abort," Gene Kranz said simply. "The final two outcomes were not good." That is an understatement on a grand scale. Innovative Engineering Nimble Problem Solving Precise Ownership Holy Crap Quote: “One small step for man, one giant step for mankind.” Neil Armstrong “For one priceless moment in the whole history of man, all the people on this Earth are truly one.” President Richard Nixon, in telephone call to Armstrong and Aldrin while they were on the moon. Holy Crap Challenge: Think Bigger: Too often our goals are not big enough. I challenge you to dream bigger and then think strategically to accomplish more Reach Higher: Challenge yourself to do what you have never done before. Maybe it needs to be one of those Big Hairy Audacious Ideas, seemingly impossible. Do the Impossible: Challenge yourself to persist through what seems like a disaster. Don’t quit unless it is absolutely necessary. Remember those last few seconds before Armstrong landed on the moon. He trained so he could solve whatever problem was thrown at him and still succeed. Without that training, he might have been a sad footnote in history.
35:15
August 7, 2020
117 The Boring Tunnel
Holy Crap Accomplishment: The Las Vegas Boring Tunnel will connect the Las Vegas Convention Center New Exhibit Hall with the existing campus (North/Central/South Halls). Three station locations will offer convenient access between key LVCC destinations and nearby transportation connections. A usually 15-minute trip will be reduced 10 approximately 1 minute. A second project is designed to go from Freemont Street to Mandalay Bay, for example, can take up to 30 minutes. The same trip on Vegas Loop will take approximately 3 minutes. What is Loop? Loop is a high-speed underground public transportation system in which passengers are transported via compatible autonomous electric vehicles (AEVs) at up to 155 miles per hour. The benefits of subsurface transportation systems include: no surface noise or vibration, tunnel construction and operation will be silent, invisible, and imperceptible at the surface, no communities divided with lanes and barriers, comfortable and convenient for passengers, higher speeds and straighter alignments, unaffected by weather. The Loop will pack those passengers into Tesla vehicles, including a “tram” that can fit between 12 and 16 passengers built on the Model 3 platform. They will eventually zip through the tunnels autonomously, but they will start off with drivers. , Holy Crap Thinking: Instead of building above ground, go underground. Find the space that is unused. Instead of a train type of subway, this is a tunnel system with autonomous cars. Go opposite. Zig when they Zag. Company Perspective: The Vegas project could turn the tide, demonstrating to other cities that the tunnel-digging venture could offer a solution to their transit needs. In May 2020, the firm completed digging for the project. The team then planned to focus on constructing the three passenger stations, with Musk claiming they could finish the project this year. Slowly but surely, the firm is emerging to offer a solution that could work out cheaper for cities. Musk has a vision of an updated version of the Loop, the form of transportation he initially plans to use in the tunnels. The plan is to eventually shift some projects to Hyperloops, the high-speed capsule in a vacuum tube that Musk envisions whisking passengers from Washington to New York in 29 minutes. Holy Crap Quote: 1.  "The first step is to establish that something is possible; then probability will occur." 2.  "I think it is possible for ordinary people to choose to be extraordinary." 3.  "I could either watch it happen or be a part of it." Holy Crap Challenge: Think Bigger: Think like Elon Musk. Establish that something is possible. You can do what is extraordinary. You can be a part of doing that impossible. Reach Higher: Start. Strategize. Succeed. Don’t just sit there and dream about it, DO IT. The brilliance of Musk is that he isn’t afraid to try. He sees what is possible, assembles a collaborative team that willingly works to make it happen. Do the Impossible: Persist. Be diligent and resilient. Keep going until you succeed. Then enjoy the success before starting on the next project.
34:48
July 31, 2020
116 Seat Belt Laws
People started installing their own seat belts as early as the first cars to reduce the bouncing. In the 1930s, physicians in the US equipped their cars with lap belts and urged auto manufactures to provide them in all new cars. 1950 saw the first factory installed seat belts in the Nash Statesman and Ambassador models. Retractable seat belts in automobiles were first introduced in the early 1950s by a neurologist, Dr. C. Hunter Shelden, as a way to prevent people suffering from auto accident-related head trauma. Volvo design engineer, Nils Bohlin, patented the first 3-point safety belt in 1958. There were no regulations for seat belt performance in the U.S. until after National Traffic and Motor Vehicle Safety Act of 1966 created what is now the National Highway Safety Traffic Administration (NHTSA). The first seat belt law took effect in 1968. The law required manufacturers to fit seat belts into vehicles. In 1965, Nader, 31, penned "Unsafe at Any Speed," a best-selling exposé that claimed car manufacturers were sacrificing lives for style and profit. Nader argued that Detroit willfully neglected advances in auto safety to keep costs down. Yet, the use of seat belts didn’t become mandatory until each state in the U.S. established their own seat belt laws. In 1984New York became the first state to mandate that drivers use a seat belt. Over the next eleven years 48 other states instituted seat belt use laws. New Hampshire is the only U.S. state without a seat belt use law for drivers. Holy Crap Thinking There were many arguments for and against seat belt laws. Many argued stronger seat belt laws reduce their personal freedom, taking away their right to choose whether or not to buckle up. Some say there would have been fewer injuries if they had not been wearing a seat belt. First responders also say they often see passengers who wore their seat belts too loosely, leading to increased injury. "I'm just going down the street." But 80 percent of fatal traffic accidents happen within 25 miles of the home. If you are thrown from the vehicle, you are 25 percent more likely to be fatally injured. If there is a fire or your car is submerged, you are more likely to get out quickly if you have not been severely injured in the crash. Constitutional Exercise of Police Power for Public Health Decisions in seat belt cases generally follow the reasoning used in many other cases involving related highway safety issues, such as laws requiring mandatory helmet use by motorcyclists and securing small children in child restraints, which view such regulations as a reasonable exercise of a state's police power in the interests of the public health and welfare. Holy Crap Quote: You can’t escape the responsibility of tomorrow by evading it today. Abraham Lincoln “Every right implies a responsibility; Every opportunity, an obligation, Every possession, a duty.” John D. Rockefeller Holy Crap Challenge: Think Bigger: Notice that those resisting seat belt laws resist authority telling them what to do. Instead of thinking, “my rights”, think “my responsibility” or “my duty.” Shift your thinking. Is resisting really worth the effort? Reach Higher: Spend your energy on what is important, which is seizing incredible opportunities, not resisting helpful action. Do the Impossible: Collaborate with others to willingly do what others never imaged.
38:58
July 24, 2020
115 The Spanish Flu
The Spanish flu, also known as the 1918 flu pandemic, was an unusually deadly influenza pandemic caused by the H1N1 influenza A virus. Lasting February 1918 to April 1920, it infected 500 million people–about a third of the world's population at the time–in four successive waves. The death toll may have been anything from 17 million to 50 million, and possibly as high as 100 million, making it one of the deadliest pandemics in human history.[ The first wave of the flu lasted from the first quarter of 1918 and was relatively mild. The first wave caused a significant disruption in the military operations of World War I, with three-quarters of French troops, half the British forces, and over 900,000 German soldiers sick. In January 1919 a third wave of the Spanish Flu hit Australia, where it killed 12,000 following the lifting of a maritime quarantine, and then spread quickly through Europe and the United States, where it lingered through the Spring and until June 1919. In spring 1920 a very minor fourth wave occurred in isolated areas including New York City, the United Kingdom, Austria, Scandinavia, and some South American islands. Peru experienced a late wave in early 1920, and Japan had one from late 1919 to 1920, with the last cases in March. Holy Crap Thinking Because of World War I, many countries engaged in wartime censorship, and suppressed reporting of the pandemic. For example, the Italian newspaper Corriere della Sera was prohibited from reporting daily death tolls. The newspapers of the time were also generally paternalistic and worried about mass panic. Misinformation and conspiracy theories were abound. Officials in some communities-imposed quarantines, ordered citizens to wear masks and shut down public places, including schools, churches and theaters. People were advised to avoid shaking hands and to stay indoors, libraries put a halt on lending books and regulations were passed banning spitting. Up to 30 grams of Aspirin daily was initially recommended, a dose now known to be fatal. Philadelphia downplayed the disease. They hosted a Liberty Loan parade attended by tens of thousands of Philadelphians, spreading the disease like wildfire. In just 10 days, over 1,000 Philadelphians were dead, with another 200,000 sick. Only then did the city close saloons and theaters. By March 1919, over 15,000 citizens of Philadelphia had lost their lives. St. Louis, Missouri, was different: Schools and movie theaters closed and public gatherings were banned. Consequently, the peak mortality rate in St. Louis was just one-eighth of Philadelphia’s death rate during the peak of the pandemic. Citizens in San Francisco were fined $5—a significant sum at the time—if they were caught in public without masks and charged with disturbing the peace. “Mask slackers" disobeyed the law and were arrested. By the summer of 1919, the flu pandemic came to an end, as those that were infected either died or developed immunity. Holy Crap Quote: “Ironically, it was not the flu that actually killed people but the way in which it weakened them in ways that allowed pneumonia or meningitis could set in.” ― Charles River Editors Holy Crap Challenge: Think Bigger! Reach Higher! Do the Impossible!
34:06
July 17, 2020
114 Hoover Dam
Holy Crap Accomplishment:  HOOVER DAM Four primary reasons were cited by federal officials as to why the dam was being built: ·  flood control, ·  water conservation, ·  domestic water supply, and ·  power. The main reason for building Hoover Dam was to supply the electrical power necessary to transport 4.4 million acre-feet—over a quarter of the Colorado River's average annual flow—to California. Soon, the dam also would supply water to Las Vegas, whose revenue would be used to finance more water projects. In less than two years, 5,000 men using new concrete technology built a structure greater in volume than the Great Pyramid in Egypt. which, according to Herodotus, required 100,000 men working 20 years to complete. Hoover Dam was a project that demonstrated to America and the world that construction of such a large dam was possible. And the numbers associated with the project demonstrate this magnitude: 5.5 million cubic yards of material were excavated; 4.4 million cubic yards of concrete placed; 45 million pounds of reinforced steel used; and 21,6 million pounds of gates and valves installed. Over 44 million tons of steel were formed and welded into 14,800 feet of penstock and outlet pipes. The average number of people employed on the project was 3,500 with over 5,000 employed during the peak of construction. To this day, it remains the highest dam in the Western Hemisphere. Towering 726 ft above the Colorado River, it is 1,244 ft across at the top, 660 ft thick at the base and 45 ft thick at the top and weighs in at whopping 6.6 millions tons Obstacles: ·  Transform a desert into a viable economic region ·  Built during the Great Depression ·  Harsh weather o  125 degree summer heat o  Cloudbursts o  High winds o  Sudden floods ·  Difficult to find Financing ·  Rugged terrain ·  Remote Location ·  Build o  Roads o  Railroads o  222 Transmission line to California for power o  Reroute River to build o  New town to house 5000 workers Holy Crap Thinking 1.  Saw the potential in what was considered a wasteland 2.  Willing to create world-class engineering, equipment and processes 3.   Willing to endure harsh conditions Holy Crap Quote: "It is fitting that the flag of our country should fly here in honor of those men who, inspired by a vision of lonely lands made fruitful, conceived this great work and of those others whose genius and labor made that vision a reality.” Inscription at the base of the dam. Holy Crap Challenge: THINK BIGGER:
36:02
July 10, 2020
113 Polio Vaccine
Holy Crap Accomplishment: POLIO VACINE Polio was ·  recurring epidemic in early 1900 in U.S. ·  affected mostly the young ·  most recovered quickly ·  killing approximately 1 in 10 of those paralyzed. ·  Most were confined to wheelchairs or iron lungs for the rest of their lives ·  Became a disease parents feared most 1921: Future President Franklin Delano Roosevelt contracted polio leaving in a wheelchair the rest of his life.  His ailment was largely kept from the public. 1932: Roosevelt elected U.S. President 1935: Maurice Brodie & John Kolmer create vaccine. Thousands of parents volunteered themselves and their children for the vaccination. One year trial ended with 9 children dying due to the vaccine. The trial was quickly ended. 1947: Salk begins work at Univ. of Pittsburgh. Had dedicated his life to vaccine development. 1952:  the worst epidemic of polio in the U.S. was recorded. Approximately 3,145 people died and almost 60,000 were reported to have contracted the virus. 1955: Polio Vaccine was developed in 1955 by Dr. Jonas Saulk. Within 2 years, by 1957, polio was reduced by 90% 1979: Polio was eliminated from the United States in 1979 1991: Polio eradicated from Western Hemisphere 2020: Ppolio is only found in 3 countries, Pakistan, Afghanistan and Nigeria. Salk never patented his discovery. He never made a profit. Holy Crap Thinking 1.  Compassion for those harmed. 2.  Fear of consequences. 3.  Passion by professionals 4.  Commitment to results 5.  Overcoming major failure. 6.  Sense of responsibility to the world and its future Holy Crap Quote: “I have had dreams, and I've had nightmares. I overcame the nightmares because of my dreams.” “There is hope in dreams, imagination, and in the courage of those who wish to make those dreams a reality.” “If humankind would accept and acknowledge this responsibility and become creatively engaged in the process of evolution, consciously as well as unconsciously, a new reality would emerge, and a new age could be born.” Holy Crap Challenge: THINK BIGGER: Think unselfish. Focus on the greater good. REACH HIGHER: Work with others to overcome community failures and challenges. In the end, you will do significant things. As I like to say, Great things happen when good people work together.
34:49
July 3, 2020
112 Amazon's Beginning & Growth
Holy Crap Accomplishment: AMAZON’S BEGINNING AND GROWTH Jeff Bezos founded Amazon in July 1994. He chose Seattle because of technical talent as Microsoft is located there.[29] In May 1997, the organization went public. The company began selling music and videos in 1998, at which time it began operations internationally by acquiring online sellers of books in United Kingdom and Germany. The following year, the organization also sold video games, consumer electronics, home-improvement items, software, games, and toys in addition to other items. In 2002, the corporation started Amazon Web Services (AWS), which provided data on Web site popularity, Internet traffic patterns and other statistics for marketers and developers. In 2006, the organization grew its AWS portfolio when Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2), which rents computer processing power as well as Simple Storage Service (S3), that rents data storage via the Internet, were made available. That same year, the company started Fulfillment by Amazon which managed the inventory of individuals and small companies selling their belongings through the company internet site. In 2012, Amazon bought Kiva Systems to automate its inventory-management business, purchasing Whole Foods Market supermarket chain five years later in 2017.[30] Holy Crap Thinking 1. Multi-level (e-commerce strategy) 2. Collaboration ·  Partners with Suppliers o  Let’s other large companies sell their products in addition to selling through their own sites o  Leases space for those retailers. o  Uses drop shippers – so they Amazon doesn’t touch the products ·  Partnership with consumers o  Let’s everyone sell o  Let’s everyone buy o  Let’s everyone post reviews 4. Disrupted traditional business and then reintroduced it. ·  Brought consumers online ·  Now returning to brick and mortar Amazon employs a multi-level e-commerce strategy. Amazon started by focusing on business-to-consumer relationships between itself and its customers and business-to-business relationships between itself and its suppliers and then moved to facilitate customer-to-customer with the Amazon marketplace which acts as an intermediary to facilitate transactions. The company lets anyone sell nearly anything using its platform. In addition to an affiliate program that lets anyone post Amazon links and earn a commission on click-through sales, there is now a program which lets those affiliates build entire websites based on Amazon's platform.[120] Holy Crap Quote: “If there’s one reason we have done better than of our peers in the Internet space over the last six years, it is because we have focused like a laser on customer experience, and that really does matter, I think, in any business. It certainly matters online, where word-of-mouth is so very, very powerful.” Jeff Bezos “If everything you do needs to work on a three-year time horizon, then you’re competing against a lot of people. But if you’re willing to invest on a seven-year time horizon, you’re now competing against a fraction of those people, because very few companies are willing to do that. Holy Crap Challenge: THINK BIGGER: See the multiple-levels of any great success. See in layers. Layers of products and services. Layers of vendors and applications. Layers of customers and their involvement. Also see the layers in building business. Bezos knows it takes vision, strategy, execution, patience, and hard work. 
35:44
June 26, 2020
111 Henry Ford
Holy Crap Accomplishment: HENRY FORD DOUBLES WAGES There’s no more direct way to invest in your business than to pay your employees well. Henry Ford knew this. Early on, the Ford Motor Company was struggling to keep employees and had an extremely high turnover rate. In 1913, Ford hired more than 52,000 men to keep a workforce of only 14,000. To address the turnover issue, Henry Ford upped his employees’ pay from $2.25 a day to $5.00 day, twice the average wage for automobile makers in 1914. In addition, he reduced the work day for his workforce from 9 hours to 8 hours, a significant departure from the 60-hour work week that was typical in American manufacturing. At the time, this move was considered “crazy”; Ford was raising wages at the very time when other auto manufacturers were trying to reduce wages to the lowest acceptable standard! Once wages increased to $5 per day, productivity surged. Ford doubled the company’s profits in under two years. He raised wages again in 1919 to $6.00 a day. Holy Crap Thinking 1.  Ford told a reporter later, “If the floor sweeper’s heart is in his job he can save us five dollars a day by picking up small tools instead of sweeping them out.” 2. Henry Ford recognized that in order to build an innovative business, one that makes products the world has never seen before, he needed a compensation plan that would attract top-notch employees who possessed specialized skills and a high dose of grit. To get these people, he needed to send the message that Ford was the place where talent would be recognized and handsomely rewarded. 3. “The owner, the employees, and the buying public are all one and the same, and unless an industry can so manage itself as to keep wages high and prices low it destroys itself, for otherwise it limits the number of its customers. One’s own employees ought to be one’s own best customers.” “We increased the buying power of our own people, and they increased the buying power of other people, and so on and on,” Ford wrote. “It is this thought of enlarging buying power by paying high wages and selling at low prices that is behind the prosperity of this country.” 4. Ford thought bigger to than his competitors. They saw competition with workers, he saw connectivity. His workers became his best customers. Raising wages allowed them to buy his cars. It raised the standard and shifted the economy to customers. Holy Crap Quote: “We increased the buying power of our own people, and they increased the buying power of other people, and so on and on,” Ford wrote. “It is this thought of enlarging buying power by paying high wages and selling at low prices that is behind the prosperity of this country.” “The man who will use his skill and constructive imagination to see how much he can give for a dollar, instead of how little he can give for a dollar, is bound to succeed.” Henry Ford Holy Crap Challenge: THINK BIGGER: See the connectivity of everyone and every action. See how you can give more value and how that action has ripple effects throughout the world.
34:07
June 19, 2020
110 Space X
Holy Crap Accomplishment: SPACE X MANNED LAUNCH Space X is scheduled to launch the first U.S. manned spaceflight since 2011.   Major achievements of SpaceX include: Landmark achievements of SpaceX in chronological order include:[70][unreliable source?] • The first privately funded liquid-fueled rocket to reach orbit (Falcon 1 flight 4 on 28 September 2008) • The first privately developed liquid-fueled rocket to put a commercial satellite in orbit (RazakSAT on Falcon 1 flight 5 on 14 July 2009) • The first private company to successfully launch, orbit, and recover a spacecraft (SpaceX Dragon on COTS Demo Flight 1 on 9 December 2010) • The first private company to send a spacecraft to the International Space Station (Dragon C2+ on 25 May 2012) • The first private company to send a satellite into geosynchronous orbit (SES-8 on Falcon 9 flight 7 on 3 December 2013) • The first landing of an orbital rocket's first stage on land (Falcon 9 flight 20 on 22 December 2015) • The first landing of an orbital rocket's first stage on an ocean platform (Falcon 9 flight 23 on 8 April 2016) • The first relaunch and landing of a used orbital rocket stage (B1021 on Falcon 9 flight 32 on 30 March 2017)[71] • The first controlled flyback and recovery of a payload fairing (Falcon 9 flight 32 on 30 March 2017)[72] • The first reflight of a commercial cargo spacecraft. (Dragon C106 on CRS-11 mission on 3 June 2017)[73] • The first private company to send an object into heliocentric orbit (Elon Musk's Tesla Roadster on Falcon Heavy test flight on 6 February 2018) • The first private company to send a human-rated spacecraft to space (Crew Dragon Demo-1, on Falcon 9 flight 69 on 2 March 2019) • The first private company to autonomously dock a spacecraft to the International Space Station (Crew Dragon Demo-1, on Falcon 9 flight 69 on 2 March 2019) • The first use of a full flow staged combustion cycle engine (Raptor) in a free flying vehicle (Starhopper, multiple tests in 2019). • The first reuse of payload fairing. On 11 November 2019 on Starlink 1 Falcon 9 launch. Fairing was from the ArabSat-6A mission in April earlier that year. Musk has stated that one of his goals is to decrease the cost and improve the reliability of access to space, ultimately by a factor of ten.[51] CEO Elon Musk said: "I believe $500 per pound ($1100/kg) or less is very achievable".[52] Holy Crap Thinking 1. Lofty goals 2. Musk wanted to go to Mars. Too expensive so he refocused.  3. Saw the value of re-usable rockets.  Holy Crap Quote:  “I think fundamentally the future is vastly more exciting and interesting if we're a spacefaring civilization and a multiplanet species than if we're or not. You want to be inspired by things. You want to wake up in the morning and think the future is going to be great. And that's what being a spacefaring civilization is all about.” (Sep, 2017 | “We [SpaceX] started off with just a few people who really didn't know how to make rockets. And the reason that I ended up being the chief engineer or chief designer, was not because I want to, it's because I couldn't hire anyone. Nobody good would join. So I ended up being that by default. And I messed up the first three launches.” (Sep, 2017 | Source) Holy Crap Challenge: THINK BIGGER: Think beyond you’re your current world. Be the crazy person that dreams seemingly impossible thoughts. REACH HIGHER: Be willing to step up and do what is needed. Go beyond your comfort zone of current skill level. Learn the new skills needed to make your dreams a reality. DO THE IMPOSSIBLE: Make that your goal. 
33:37
June 12, 2020
109 COVID Decisions
“Holy Crap Accomplishment” Holy crap, how’d they decide that? We’re talking government and their coronavirus decisions. We make the full disclosure that neither of us are hardline for nor against either political party or ideology. We’ll be talking about the decisions that were made, where they came from, what were the results, and will they be the same next time? “Holy Crap Thinking” Some of the decisions should not have been “either or”, they should have been “both” “and”. Some of our leaders made and continue to make great decisions that use disruptive thinking, doing their best amid a changing situation, others have seemingly fallen flat. Look back on your decisions and see if there are ways you could have done better. Don’t rest on your laurels and don’t defend your decisions, just make “Holy Crap Quote” “The test of a first-rate intelligence is the ability to hold two opposed ideas in mind at the same time and still retain the ability to function.” F. Scott Fitzgerald said that in 1936. He is widely regarded as one of the greatest American writers of the 20th century. “Holy Crap Challenge” Don’t fall into the “either or” category. It can be “both and”, a hybrid or something else altogether.
48:00
June 5, 2020
108 COVID Heroes - Volunteers
“Holy Crap Accomplishment” & “Holy Crap Thinking” Volunteers are becoming heroes of the coronavirus pandemic. In Poland, they are keeping hard-pressed medics supplied with coffee and lunch. In New York, they are packing food for people who can no longer afford to buy it. In Australia, a bookstore is delivering by bike to isolated people. Amid all the suffering and anxiety caused by the coronavirus pandemic, volunteers across the globe are showing courage and resilience in helping some of the most vulnerable. New York City has the highest number of confirmed cases of COVID-19 in the United States, exceeding even those at the outbreak’s epicenter in China’s Hubei province. Even in normal times, New York City has an estimated 1.2 million people who are short of food. City Harvest usually delivers basics to people who can't afford to buy food in five of the city’s boroughs. But the New York lockdown threatened to halt their vital work. Volunteers pack food for families who can't buy food at City Harvest, who say they have seen a surge in the number of people who need their service due to the impact of coronavirus. Streets in the Polish city of Wroclaw are deserted as people obey instructions to stay home. But the calm is deceptive. In the city’s hospitals, medical staff are working flat out to help those suffering with COVID-19. Volunteer Robert Wagner is delivering coffee, energy drinks, water and packed lunches to paramedics and doctors working overtime. “We are trying to support medical professionals, working a dozen or so hours a day to protect us against coronavirus," he says. After Joanna Cieslik's restaurant was ordered to close, along with all the city’s other cafes and restaurants, she decided to cook nourishing dishes and deliver them free to those most in need, including the elderly, sick and homeless. “We organized crowdfunding, thanks to which we can deliver meals to the most deprived persons free of charge,” Cieslik says. As the UN warns of the mental health effects of the coronavirus pandemic, one Australian bookstore has found a novel way of getting books to people in isolation. With most shops closed and people self-isolating at home, Gleebooks is using a free bicycle delivery service to get books to customers stuck in their homes. "Books are a nice way of travelling without having to go anywhere," says the store’s cyclist Nerida Ross. "I think there's a lot of anxiety. People are pretty uncertain so they're just really grateful to still be able to access the things that give them joy, without having to leave the house," says Ross. With many schools closed, the store is selling more children’s activity and craft books. “We're learning a new way of being, and I think reading is a really big part of that for people." “Holy Crap Quote” “Start by doing what's necessary; then do what's possible; and suddenly you are doing the impossible.” Francis of Assisi “Holy Crap Challenge” Volunteer! But volunteer for the right reason. Don’t expect anything in return, just pitch in and help somewhere.
34:47
May 29, 2020
107 COVID Heroes - Business Pivot
“Holy Crap Accomplishment” Distilleries making Sanitizer Car manufacturers making ventilators Haberdashery making masks Virtual chef dinners Take out dining “Holy Crap Thinking” 1. Necessity is the mother of invention – gotta make money 2. Some quit – but the successful found another way 3. Compassion - Public Service “Holy Crap Quote” “It always seems impossible until it's done.” Nelson Mandela “There is nothing impossible to him who will try.” Alexander the Great “Holy Crap Challenge” Find the opportunities to make more money or make a significant difference in the worst of times.
47:09
May 22, 2020
106 COVID Heroes - Pennsylvania Factory Workers
“Holy Crap Accomplishment” Factory workers at factory working 12-hour shifts for 28 days to make N95 mask and shield material. At his factory just off the Delaware River, in the far southeastern corner of Pennsylvania, Joe Boyce clocked in on March 23 for the longest shift of his life. For 28 days, they did not leave — sleeping and working all in one place. In what they called a “live-in” at the factory, the undertaking was just one example of the endless ways that Americans in every industry have uniquely contributed to fighting coronavirus. Nikolich estimated that the Braskem plants in Pennsylvania and West Virginia have produced 40 million pounds of polypropylene over the past month — enough to hypothetically make either 500 million N95 masks or 1.5 billion surgical masks, if the material were used only for that purpose. (It will also be used for other PPE such as the gowns, Nikolich stressed.) Nikolich said the plants decided to launch the live-ins so employees could avoid having to worry about catching the virus while constantly traveling to and from work, and so the staff at the factory could be closed off to nonessential personnel. They were paid for all 24 hours each day, with a built-in wage increase for both working hours and off time, the company said. It did not disclose the specific percentages. Boyce said some guys brought their Xbox consoles and TVs, and even a cornhole set, to stay entertained. They stayed active at the on-site gym, which “has never been used so much before,” Boyce said, and stayed extra busy in the kitchen. A skilled cook, Boyce and others asked corporate for more pots and pans and a stove, whipping up creamed corn, barbecue and even filet mignon dinners for more than 40 people a night. So on Day 14, the families organized a “drive-by visit,” Boyce said. It was their hump day, celebrating not only being halfway done but also free of any signs of the virus, as no one during that 14-day period developed even a sniffle. With a police escort, more than two dozen families paraded past the plant bearing signs and cheering from the windows — too far away for a conversation but just close enough “to give a boost to all the guys,” Boyce said. “We want to walk out as a team,” Boyce said. “Everybody felt that way. It really hit me when my car got a little ways down from the plant — I’m finally going to see my family.” “Holy Crap Thinking” - it needed to be done - good business opportunity - there is a way we can do it but it will take sacrifice - no one told them they had to do it – they all volunteered No one told them they had to do it, Braskem America CEO Mark Nikolich said. All of the workers volunteered, hunkering down at the plant to ensure no one caught the virus outside as they sought to meet the rocketing demand for their key product, polypropylene, which is needed to make various medical and hygienic items. Braskem’s plant in Neal, West Virginia, is doing a second live-in now. “Holy Crap Quote” Boyce told WPVI the world has changed a lot while they’ve been at work. “We’ve almost been the lucky ones, I’ll say for the last 28 days because I haven’t had to stand six feet from somebody. I haven’t had to put a mask on.” “Holy Crap Challenge” Volunteer to do what you never thought you could do.
42:23
May 15, 2020
105 COVID Heroes - Medical Professionals
“Holy Crap Accomplishment” Health Care Workers Sacrifice to Serve As coronavirus cases continue to surge across the United States, health care workers have needed to stay agile and quickly adjust to our alarming new reality. In response to the growing medical equipment shortages, nurses and doctors have jerry-rigged their own personal protective equipment (PPE). Sports goggles have been repurposed as face shields, garbage bags have been worn as gowns — and medical workers continue to put their health at risk and do what they can to help their patients recover. But the sacrifices don’t end once the shift ends. The pandemic has completely uprooted medical workers’ personal lives and redefined what’s normal. Here are just some of the radical and heroic acts they’re doing to fight the pandemic: They’re moving away from family and into rentals. Many medical workers have moved out of their homes due to concerns they could bring the virus home and infect loved ones. Jane ― an emergency responder nurse in Philadelphia who wanted to stay anonymous due to concerns about her job ― told HuffPost she recently moved out of her parents’ house to avoid passing the virus to them. Airbnb recently dropped their prices for long-term stays, Jane said, but she still has to pay an extra $1,400 a month that she wasn’t planning to spend. Patricia Bain, a respiratory therapist and director of cardiopulmonary services at a hospital in Las Vegas, said her daughter (who has asthma and Crohn’s disease and therefore is immunosuppressed) had to move out and into her dad’s house. “I’m very concerned because I don’t want to bring anything home to family,” Bain said. “Thankfully, she’s safe, but I miss her terribly.” Leaving and coming home is a chore. Jane also said she avoids wearing clean scrubs to work because “people think you’re like a walking infection.” Of course, most people look at others as if they’re infected at this point, scrubs or no scrubs, but she said it’s been easier to change into her scrubs once she gets to the hospital to not worry people. Bain feels similarly. “I don’t go to the store in scrubs. People give dirty looks or make comments,” she said. Returning home is no easy task either. Britt ― a nurse treating COVID-19 patients in San Diego who also wished to stay anonymous ― said she has to strip down to her underwear outside her front door after each shift to avoid bringing home anything that could be contaminated. Then she throws her clothes in the hamper, runs to the shower, washes her scrubs, disinfects her phone, keys, doorknobs and any other surfaces she touched. “Getting in and out of my house, to and from work, takes twice as long as it normally would,” she said. Many who are on the frontlines have experienced an influx of texts, calls and messages from people they haven’t heard from in a while, asking what the infection is really like and if it’s as bad as the news says. Most conversations outside of work also revolve around the coronavirus — it’s hard to escape. “Holy Crap Thinking” Service: It’s what we do. Self-Sacrifice Mandated by employer “Holy Crap Quote” “I’m not trying to do this all summer, I’ll tell you that much,” Britt said, “but people need help, and that’s why I became a nurse.” “Holy Crap Challenge” Find ways to adapt
38:09
May 8, 2020
104 Elon Musk
“Holy Crap Accomplishment” Elon Musk is a Canadian-American entrepreneur. He is the founder of SpaceX, Tesla, and Zip2, among others. He was also one of the people responsible for the success of PayPal. Currently he serves as (CEO) and Chief Designer (CDO) of SpaceX, CEO and product architect of Tesla, and chair of SolarCity. As a child, Musk attended the independent Waterkloof House Preparatory School. He did his final exams at Pretoria Boys High School and moved to Canada in June of 1989. He then became a Canadian citizen through his Canadian mother. In 1989 Elon Musk was admitted to Queen’s University in Kingston, Ontario. In 1992, after two years at Queen’s University, Musk left for the University of Pennsylvania, where he earned his Bachelor of Science degree in Physics from Penn’s College of Arts and Sciences and his Bachelor of Arts degree in Economics from the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania. Musk continued for another year to get his second bachelor. During his studies at the University of Pennsylvania, Musk and fellow student Adeo Ressi bought a student house to use as a nightclub. In 1995, at the age of 24, Musk moved to California to get his PhD in physics from Stanford University, but left the university after just two days to start his own businesses in the fields of Internet, sustainable energy, and space. He became an American citizen in 2002. When he’s just twelve years old, he’s already a better programmer than his teachers. At 24 he gives up his studies at Stanford University to start his first business. Four years later, that business is worth 300 million dollars and is bought by Compaq. In 2002 eBay buys one of his other businesses – PayPal – for the considerable sum of 1.5 billion dollars. He invests his considerable fortune in SpaceX (2002), Tesla Motors (2004), and SolarCity (2006). “Holy Crap Thinking” 1st Principle Thinking – drill down to analyze the most basic assumption “boil things down to their fundamental truths and reason up from there, as opposed to reasoning by analogy. Through most of our life, we get through life by reasoning by analogy, which essentially means copying what other people do with slight variations.” Note: how he challenged NASA’s assumptions with reusable rockets, landing on the launch pad, making everything much less expensive. No one competes with SpaceX on price. “Holy Crap Breakthrough Moment” “what would happen if we . . .” “Holy Crap Quote” “Well, I do think there’s a good framework for thinking. It is physics. You know, the sort of first principles reasoning. Generally I think there are — what I mean by that is, boil things down to their fundamental truths and reason up from there, as opposed to reasoning by analogy. Through most of our life, we get through life by reasoning by analogy, which essentially means copying what other people do with slight variations.” “Holy Crap Challenge” Challenge your assumptions, your foundational truths about a particular problem. What will you commit to do in the next 2 minutes to capitalize on this opportunity? What will you do in the next 24 hours to honor that commitment? When you look back on this moment in 5 years, will you say, “Holy Crap. I did that?” or “Holy Crap, I should have done that!”
35:15
May 2, 2020
103 Leonardo DaVinci - How Did He Become The Ultimate Renaissance Man?
“Holy Crap Accomplishment” Leonardo da Vinci, (Italian: “Leonardo from Vinci”) (born April 15, 1452, Anchiano, near Vinci, Republic of Florence [Italy]—died May 2, 1519, Cloux [now Clos-Lucé], France), Italian painter, draftsman, sculptor, architect, and engineer whose genius, perhaps more than that of any other figure, epitomized the Renaissance humanist ideal. His Last Supper (1495–98) and Mona Lisa (c. 1503–19) are among the most widely popular and influential paintings of the Renaissance. His notebooks reveal a spirit of scientific inquiry and a mechanical inventiveness that were centuries ahead of their time. An artist by disposition and endowment, he considered his eyes to be his main avenue to knowledge; to Leonardo, sight was man’s highest sense because it alone conveyed the facts of experience immediately, correctly, and with certainty. Hence, every phenomenon perceived became an object of knowledge, and saper vedere (“knowing how to see”) became the great theme of his studies. He applied his creativity to every realm in which graphic representation is used: he was a painter, sculptor, architect, and engineer. But he went even beyond that. He used his superb intellect, unusual powers of observation, and mastery of the art of drawing to study nature itself, a line of inquiry that allowed his dual pursuits of art and science to flourish. https://www.britannica.com/biography/Leonardo-da-Vinci Leonardo’s parents were unmarried at the time of his birth. His father, Ser Piero, was a Florentine notary and landlord, and his mother, Caterina, was a young peasant woman who shortly thereafter married an artisan. Leonardo grew up on his father’s family’s estate, where he was treated as a “legitimate” son and received the usual elementary education of that day: reading, writing, and arithmetic. Leonardo did not seriously study Latin, the key language of traditional learning, until much later, when he acquired a working knowledge of it on his own. He also did not apply himself to higher mathematics—advanced geometry and arithmetic—until he was 30 years old, when he began to study it with diligent tenacity. “Holy Crap Thinking” Insatiable curiosity (this is the main thing we will focus on in this episode) Observation – studied everything from 3 angles Convergent Thinking – brought opposites together Merged the art of drawing with science “Holy Crap Breakthrough Moment” Imagine that moment when he first stopped to observe and thought “What if I. . .?” “Holy Crap Quote” "Learn how to see. Realize that everything connects to everything else." - Leonard da Vinci “Holy Crap Challenge” Challenge your curiosity to observe. What will you commit to do in the next 2 minutes to capitalize on this opportunity? What will you do in the next 24 hours to honor that commitment? When you look back on this moment in 5 years, will you say, “Holy Crap. I did that?” or “Holy Crap, I should have done that!”
33:32
April 24, 2020
102 One Hundred Days of Rejection
Talk about disruptive. Jai Jaing set out to insulate himself from rejection and not only discovered himself and conquered his fears, he found his life's purpose and direction. Sit down, strap yourself in and get ready. Pat Lynch is a retired cop now running his own real estate brokerage and Dr. Loren Murfield is a former college professor now serving as a business and executive coach. Together, they're Doc and the Cop and they're here to explore disruptive thinking to help you see and do farther than you ever imagined.
33:55
April 17, 2020
101 Thinking Bigger in Tough Times
During tough times there are HUGE opportunities. On our inaugural edition, myself and co-host Dr. Loren Murfield will discuss how to spot the trends, bends and opportunities in today's climate. Dr. Loren Murfield is a former college professor who works with business leaders small and large to do what they never thought possible. I am a retired police supervisor from a large metropolitan department, now partnering with motivated Florida real estate agents looking to stand out above the rest. Together, we're Doc and the Cop and we're here to help you think bigger and reach higher to deliver disruptive success for today's world. We'll see you next time!
35:37
April 10, 2020