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Human Voices Wake Us

Human Voices Wake Us

By Human Voices Wake Us

The poem says, "Human voices wake us, and we drown." But I’ve made this podcast with the belief that human voices are what we need. And so, whether from a year or three thousand years ago, whether poetry or prose, whether fiction or diary or biography, here are the best things we have ever thought, written, or said.

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Currently playing episode

Robert Lowell: 10 Essential Poems

Human Voices Wake Us

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Van Gogh's Early Years
Van Gogh's Early Years
Tonight, we enter into the early years of Vincent van Gogh (1853-1890), from his birth in the village of Zundert in the Netherlands, to his time in the Borinage mining region of Belgium. It was there, at the age of twenty-seven—and after years of personal and professional failures—that he hit bottom … and suddenly realized he was an artist. In the first half of the episode, I read from Steven Naifeh and Gregory White Smith’s biography, Van Gogh: The Life. The second half is devoted to a handful of letters Van Gogh wrote to his brother in 1879 and 1880, where he admits the humiliation of his failures, and then revels in his newfound passion for drawing and painting. The letters can be found online here. You can join Human Voices Wake Us on Patreon, or sign up for our newsletter, by clicking here. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
53:29
December 07, 2022
Give Me Another Tarantula
Give Me Another Tarantula
What happens when two comedians lose all their confidence when they meet in an elevator? What is the happiest story you can think of (hint: it almost always comes from childhood)? What are the unfinished or untouched obsessions you’ve collected material for, but never gotten around to? How lucky was Shakespeare to have been born just at the time when the translation of Latin literature became all the rage in England? What do Shakespeare’s Macbeth and the French photographer Eugene Atget have in common… and are you, dear listener out there, an autodidact? How does it feel to be able to find a book, any book at all, much more easily than Richard Wagner could dream? And are you someone like William H. Macy in the movie Magnolia, who has “a lot of love to give?” And are you like Van Gogh, who knows he has a purpose, but can’t find it yet? In other words, tonight is another edition of Give Me a Tarantula, a catch-all for every small idea that can’t fill an episode on their own. You can join Human Voices Wake Us on Patreon, or sign up for our newsletter, by clicking here. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
51:22
November 29, 2022
Robert Lowell: 10 Essential Poems
Robert Lowell: 10 Essential Poems
Tonight I read ten essential poems from the American poet, Robert Lowell (1917-1977). They can all be found in his Collected Poems. His letters are collected in The Letters of Robert Lowell, Words in Air: The Complete Correspondence Between Elizabeth Bishop & Robert Lowell, and The Dolphin Letters, 1970-1979: Elizabeth Hardwick, Robert Lowell, and Their Circle. It’s been a while, but I remember enjoying Paul Mariani’s Lost Puritan: A Life of Robert Lowell. · Memories of West Street & Lepke (from Life Studies, 1959) · The Public Garden (from For the Union Dead, 1964) · For the Union Dead (from For the Union Dead, 1964) · History (from History, 1973) · Bobby Delano (from History, 1973) · Anne Dick I. 1936 (from History, 1973) · For Robert Kennedy 1925-68 (from History, 1973) · Marriage? (Hospital II., part 4) (from The Dolphin, 1973) · Dolphin (from The Dolphin, 1973) · Epilogue (from Day by Day, 1977) You can join Human Voices Wake Us on Patreon, or sign up for our newsletter, by clicking here. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
53:54
November 14, 2022
What Do Writers & Actors Have in Common?
What Do Writers & Actors Have in Common?
Tonight I talking about creativity and wonder what actors and writers have in common. The springboard for much of what I say is Simon Callow’s article in the New York Review of Books, which itself is a review of Isaac Butler’s “history” of Method acting, The Method: How the Twentieth Century Learned to Act. Please consider supporting Human Voices Wake us by clicking here. You can also support this podcast by going to wordandsilence.com and checking out any of my books. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
49:06
November 04, 2022
True Horror
True Horror
Tonight I talk about the nature of horror/true crime books and movies to ask: what makes a story truly frightening, instead of just entertaining? What kinds of movies or books, or ways of storytelling, take us beyond entertainment to true horror, to actual fear? How does the disturbing story of Ed Gein end up, filtered through convention and expectation, as “standard” (even if classic) movies like Psycho, The Texas Chainsaw Massacre, and The Silence of the Lambs? Discussed along the way: Marlon Brando in Apocalypse Now, the new Netflix series on Jeffrey Dahmer, the movie The Exorcist, Stephen King’s Pet Sematary, the use of crime scene photos for advertising TV shows, and the unavoidable re-traumatization of victims and their families with each new show, book, movie (or, indeed, podcast). Please consider supporting Human Voices Wake us by clicking here. You can also support this podcast by going to wordandsilence.com and checking out any of my books. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
57:43
October 27, 2022
The Great Myths #21: The Story of Creation in the Norse Eddas
The Great Myths #21: The Story of Creation in the Norse Eddas
In this second episode on Norse Mythology, I read from the creation myths found in the poem, “Voluspa,” found in the Poetic Edda, and from its corresponding sections in the Prose Edda. I also read from commentaries on these sections. The translation of the Poetic Edda that I read from is by Andy Orchard, and the Prose Edda by Anthony Faulkes. The commentary I read from on the Poetic Edda, for the last half hour of the episode, comes from the translation and commentary by Ursula Dronke. The essential reference books on Norse myth that I will be using for this series are John Lindow’s Norse Mythology: A Guide to the Gods, Heroes, Rituals & Beliefs, Rudolf Simek’s Dictionary of Northern Mythology, and Andy Orchard’s Cassell Dictionary of Norse Myth & Legend. Please consider supporting Human Voices Wake us by clicking here. You can also support this podcast by going to wordandsilence.com and checking out any of my books. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
01:22:29
October 19, 2022
Old Friends
Old Friends
Tonight I talk about a dear friend from my youth, who made a great impact on me into my early twenties. Along the way I read from Hermann Hesse’s Demian and Steppenwolf. The music that begins the episode is Simon and Garfunkel’s “Bookends Theme.” Please consider supporting Human Voices Wake us by clicking here. You can also support this podcast by going to wordandsilence.com and checking out any of my books. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
01:07:43
October 11, 2022
Ted Hughes: 12 Essential Poems
Ted Hughes: 12 Essential Poems
Tonight I read twelve essential poems from the British poet Ted Hughes (1930-1998). They can all be found in his Collected Poems (smaller selections of his poetry include Selected Poems 1957-1994 and A Ted Hughes Bestiary). In this episode I also read from The Letters of Ted Hughes. The poems are: Wind (from the Hawk in the Rain, 1957) Six Young Men (from the Hawk in the Rain, 1957) Crow's Song About God (from Crow, 1970-71) “I skin the skin” (from Gaudete, 1977) A Green Mother (from Cave Birds, 1978) Bride and Groom Lie Hidden for Three Days (from Cave Birds, 1978) Cock-Crows (from Remains of Elmet, 1979) Rain (from Moortown Diary, 1979) February 17th (from Moortown Diary, 1979) Four March Watercolours (from River, 1983) October Salmon (from River, 1983) Life After Death (from Birthday Letters, 1998) This is followed by a reading Hughes gave of his poem, “October Salmon.” Other episodes on Hughes include one where he discusses privacy for his family in the wake of Sylvia Plath’s posthumous fame; another where he discusses how he discovered poetry; and another, much longer episode of readings (4.5 hours) from Hughes’s poetry. Please consider supporting Human Voices Wake us by clicking here. You can also support this podcast by going to wordandsilence.com and checking out any of my books. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
01:23:47
October 03, 2022
Robinson Jeffers: 10 Essential Poems
Robinson Jeffers: 10 Essential Poems
Tonight I read ten essential poems from the American poet Robinson Jeffers (1187-1962). Selections of Jeffers’s poetry are legion: many of them can be found here. The five-volume Collected Poems of Robinson Jeffers, edited by Tim Hunt and published by Stanford University Press, can be found here. You can read more about his life at the Poetry Foundation and Wikipedia. A larger selection of his poetry, which I recorded in 2020-2021, can be found here. The poems I read are: The Excesses of God Point Joe Hooded Night New Mexican Mountain Nova from Hungerfield De Rerum Virtute Vulture “I am seventy-four years old and suddenly all my strength” Inscription for a Gravestone The episode ends with a 1941 Library of Congress recording of Jeffers reading his poem, “Natural Music.” Please consider supporting Human Voices Wake us by clicking here. You can also support this podcast by going to wordandsilence.com and checking out any of my books. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
53:12
September 23, 2022
The Great Myths #20: Introducing Norse Myth & Reading the Voluspa
The Great Myths #20: Introducing Norse Myth & Reading the Voluspa
For the next year or more, my series on The Great Myths will focus on Norse mythology. Tonight I introduce the subject and read one of its foundational texts, the poem that starts the Poetic Edda, “Voluspa,” as translated by Andy Orchard. The two translations of the Poetic Edda that I mention are those by Andy Orchard and Carolyn Larrington. The two translations of the Prose Edda that I mention are those by Anthony Faulkes and Jesse Byock. The essential reference books on Norse myth that I will be using for this series are John Lindow’s Norse Mythology: A Guide to the Gods, Heroes, Rituals & Beliefs, Rudolf Simek’s Dictionary of Northern Mythology, and Andy Orchard’s Cassell Dictionary of Norse Myth & Legend. Please consider supporting Human Voices Wake us by clicking here. You can also support this podcast by going to wordandsilence.com and checking out any of my books. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
01:21:14
September 15, 2022
Stephen King's Great Novel of Parenthood & Grief
Stephen King's Great Novel of Parenthood & Grief
Tonight I spent an hour talking about Stephen King’s 1983 novel, Pet Sematary, which seems to me one of the great expressions of the anxieties of being a parent. Please consider supporting Human Voices Wake us by clicking here. You can also support this podcast by going to wordandsilence.com and checking out any of my books. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
01:18:39
September 07, 2022
Give Me a Tarantula
Give Me a Tarantula
Give Me a Tarantula is a scattering of thoughts on: Old Norse & Old English Edward Hopper Five Going on Six Droning Sound Driving in Ohio Vermeer & Personal Nostalgia Dead Can Dance Primo Levi Please consider supporting Human Voices Wake us by clicking here: https://anchor.fm/humanvoiceswakeus/support Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
01:00:19
August 30, 2022
The Great Myths #19: Farewell to the Celtic Myths, & One Last Story
The Great Myths #19: Farewell to the Celtic Myths, & One Last Story
Tonight we leave the Celtic myths with an overview of The Great Myths #8-18 (which can be listened to here), and then read one final story, of Cuchulainn’s fight with Ferdiad, from Thomas Kinsella’s translation of the Táin bo Cúailnge.  The translations I have read from or referenced in these episodes include: Jeffrey Gantz, Early Irish Myths & Sagasand The Mabinogion; Thomas Kinsella, The Táin; Patrick Ford, The Mabinogi and Other Medieval Welsh Tales; Ann Dooley & Harry Roe, Tales of the Elders of Ireland; Nessa Ní Shéaghdha, The Pursuit of Diarmuid and Gráinne; Kenneth Jackson, A Celtic Miscellany. The nonfiction books I’ve relied on include: James MacKillop, Oxford Dictionary of Celtic Mythology; Mark Williams, Ireland’s Immortals: A History of the Gods of Irish Myth; and the book/documentary series that got me started on it way back when: Carmel McCaffrey and Leo Eaton’s In Search of Ancient Ireland. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. Please consider supporting Human Voices Wake us by clicking here: https://anchor.fm/humanvoiceswakeus/support I assume that the small amount of work  presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work  presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I  will remove the episode immediately.
54:48
August 22, 2022
Great Poems: Shakespeare's "To Be or Not to Be"
Great Poems: Shakespeare's "To Be or Not to Be"
Tonight I go over Shakespeare’s “To be or not to be” soliloquy from Act 3 scene 1 of Hamlet. Throughout the episode I include the performance of this speech from modern actors: the first is by Paapa Essiedu, and the second by Andrew Scott. The very last, to give a sense of what the original pronunciation of the speech would have sounded like, is performed by Ben Crystal. A larger compilation of nine different versions can be found here, and a YouTube search provides even more. The books read from in this episode are Ben and David Crystal’s Shakespeare’s Words: A Glossary and Language Companion, Marjorie Garber’s Shakespeare After All, and Peter Ackroyd’s Shakespeare: The Biography. Please consider supporting Human Voices Wake us by clicking here: https://anchor.fm/humanvoiceswakeus/support Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
01:07:12
August 12, 2022
First Person: The Atomic Bomb
First Person: The Atomic Bomb
A four-part episode on the atomic bomb, from its development to the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki and after, drawn from the words of those who were there. The full text of the quotations used here can be found in the blog versions of these podcasts. The books used to make these episodes are: The Making of the Atomic Bomb, by Richard Rhodes Dark Sun: The Making of the Hydrogen Bomb, by Richard Rhodes American Prometheus: The Triumph & Tragedy of J. Robert Oppenheimer, by Kai Bird and Martin J. Sherwin J. Robert Oppenheimer: Shatterer of Worlds, by Peter Goodchild. John Else's documentary, The Day After Trinity, can be watched here. John Bradley's anthology of poets writing about the bomb is Atomic Ghosts: Poets Respond to the Atomic Age. My poem about Robert Oppenheimer can be read here. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
02:43:56
August 04, 2022
Van Gogh: Starry Nights & Sunflowers
Van Gogh: Starry Nights & Sunflowers
Tonight I read from Steven Naifeh and Gregory White Smith’s Van Gogh: The Life, from 2012, sharing the sections covering Van Gogh’s two Starry Night paintings, and his many paintings of sunflowers. Please consider supporting Human Voices Wake us by clicking here: https://anchor.fm/humanvoiceswakeus/support Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
01:03:48
July 27, 2022
Witches in America, Napoleon in Egypt, & the Invention of the Printed Book
Witches in America, Napoleon in Egypt, & the Invention of the Printed Book
Tonight I read three sections from Jacques Barzun’s book From Dawn to Decadence: 1500 to the Present: 500 Years of Western Cultural Life: The expedition of French scholars that followed Napoleon into Egypt (24: 18) The invention of the printed book, and what it meant to education and literacy (44:00) On the Salem Witch trials of 1692, and how closely science at the time was allied with superstition You can join Human Voices Wake Us on Patreon, or sign up for our newsletter, by clicking here. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
53:49
July 19, 2022
Emily Dickinson
Emily Dickinson
Tonight I read from Brenda Wineapple’s wonderful book, White Heat: The Friendship of Emily Dickinson and Thomas Wentworth Higginson. If any listeners can recommend other books about Dickinson they have enjoyed, email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. Consider supporting Human Voices Wake us by clicking here: https://anchor.fm/humanvoiceswakeus/support Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
01:15:35
July 11, 2022
The Voice of Toni Morrison
The Voice of Toni Morrison
An episode from 6/26/22: We are incredibly lucky that, in the novelist Toni Morrison (1931-2019), we had that rare thing: a great writer who also achieved great popularity with the general public. This meant that she was interviewed about her life, her books, and about creativity and the news of the day, hundreds of times. In this episode, I’ve gone through my favorite interviews with her and gathered the best parts into these segments: (:35) On love (parental, romantic, religious) (8:25) On childhood, family history, and being a parent and a writer (43:32) On race, writing in difficult political and social moments, and being more interested in good than evil (1:11:48) On writing in general, and specifically the writing of Beloved The interviews I’ve drawn from are these: Toni Morrison In Depth, on C-SPAN Toni Morrison on Charlie Rose in 1993, 1998, and 2015 Toni Morrison, interviewed by Junot Diaz Toni Morrison interview by Farah Jasmine Griffin at the 92nd Street Y Toni Morrison on NPR’s Fresh Air: in 2015, and a Retrospective Toni Morrison on BBC’s World Book Club You can join Human Voices Wake Us on Patreon, or sign up for our newsletter here. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com.
01:45:14
June 26, 2022
The Great Myths #18: Celtic Myth and Scholarship
The Great Myths #18: Celtic Myth and Scholarship
Tonight we get back to the Celtic myths, and take a detour from the stories themselves and into what the most recent scholarship has to say about them. The book I read from is Mark Williams’s Ireland’s Immortals: A History of the Gods of Irish Myth. Previous episodes on Celtic Myth can be found here: https://wordandsilence.com/2022/03/23/the-great-myths-17-tales-of-the-elders-of-ireland-podcast/ Consider supporting Human Voices Wake us by clicking here: https://anchor.fm/humanvoiceswakeus/support Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
01:05:11
June 19, 2022
Advice from Seamus Heaney // James Joyce's "Araby"
Advice from Seamus Heaney // James Joyce's "Araby"
In tonight's episode, we hear from Seamus Heaney and James Joyce. In the first part, I read Heaney’s responses to general questions about writing poetry: his methods, his inspiration, his favorite time of day to write. These come from Dennis O’Driscoll’s Stepping Stones: Interviews with Seamus Heaney. In the second part (beginning at 35:15) I read James Joyce’s short story, “Araby.” The reading is prefaced by a few personal thoughts on Joyce, and includes an excerpt from Gabriel’s Yared’s score for the film The English Patient. I previously discussed Michael Ondaatje’s novel, Anthony Minghella’s movie, and Yared’s music for the film, in an early episode, Rereading the English Patient. Consider supporting Human Voices Wake us by clicking here. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com.
01:03:43
June 08, 2022
Loneliness // Advice from Beethoven, Joseph Campbell, W. S. Merwin
Loneliness // Advice from Beethoven, Joseph Campbell, W. S. Merwin
Tonight, I replay two of my favorite episodes from Human Voices Wake Us: from September of 2021, I talk for a moment about loneliness and creativity. The next segment (beginning at 36:00) is from July of 2021, where we hear more about creativity and living in the world, this time from Beethoven, Joseph Campbell, W. S. Merwin, and W. D. Snodgrass. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. Consider supporting Human Voices Wake us by clicking here: https://anchor.fm/humanvoiceswakeus/support I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
01:06:25
June 01, 2022
Notes from the Grid: Simple Awareness
Notes from the Grid: Simple Awareness
Tonight, I read the last three essays from Notes from the Grid. After a short introduction, the eighth essay begins at 6:00, the ninth at 26:30, and the tenth at 54:40. The audio from Philip Roth near the end of tonight's episode comes from Christopher Lydon's 2006 interview with him. Preorder print copies of Notes from the Grid here: https://wordandsilence.com/human-voices-wake-us/ As always, send any comments to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
01:16:49
May 25, 2022
Notes from the Grid: The Perpetual Adolescent
Notes from the Grid: The Perpetual Adolescent
For the next month or so, I will be reading a short book of essays, Notes from the Grid, that I have been writing since 2006. Tonight, I read the sixth and seventh (which begins at 20:30). Spirit Murmur, the album of string quartet music I mention in the episode, composed by Alan Hovhaness and performed by the Shanghai Quartet, can be purchased here. Preorder print copies of Notes from the Grid here. https://wordandsilence.com/human-voices-wake-us/ As always, send any comments to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com.
51:19
May 16, 2022
Notes from the Grid: All Things Can Console
Notes from the Grid: All Things Can Console
For the next month or so, I will be reading a short book of essays, Notes from the Grid, that it has taken me the last sixteen years to complete. Tonight, I read the fifth and the sixth. Essay number six begins at 23:27. Preorder print copies of Notes from the Grid here. https://wordandsilence.com/human-voices-wake-us/ As always, send any comments to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com.
42:33
May 09, 2022
Notes from the Grid: To Criticize the Critic
Notes from the Grid: To Criticize the Critic
For the next month or so, I will be reading a short book of essays, Notes from the Grid, that it has taken me the last sixteen years to complete. Tonight, I read the third and fourth. The second essay begins at 28:28. The excerpt I play from an interview with George Steiner comes from a 1996 episode of Desert Island Discs. Preorder print copies of Notes from the Grid here. https://wordandsilence.com/human-voices-wake-us/ As always, send any comments to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com.
37:58
May 02, 2022
Notes from the Grid: Rediscovering the Hidden Life
Notes from the Grid: Rediscovering the Hidden Life
For the next month or so, I will be reading a short book of essays, Notes from the Grid, that it has taken me the last sixteen years to complete. Tonight, I read the first two. Listen to the introduction, or click on the link above, to see how you can become a part of bringing the book into print.  After a short introduction, the first essay begins at 6:20, and the second begins at 30:22.  Preorder print copies of Notes from the Grid here: https://wordandsilence.com/human-voices-wake-us/ As always, send any comments to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com.
38:39
April 26, 2022
Walt Whitman's Mystical Poetry
Walt Whitman's Mystical Poetry
A reading of my favorite of Walt Whitman’s "mystical" poems--that is, those poems where he found identification in every and every thing, and saw that as a kind of salvation for us all. All of the poems can be found in the two recent books I edited, The Selected Short Poems of Walt Whitman, and The Selected Long Poems of Walt Whitman. Please consider getting a copy of these books (they are only $3.99), if you enjoy what you hear in this episode. Also included in this episode is (purportedly) the only known recording of Whitman, reading four lines from his poem “America” (at 54:39). For those who want to read an article about this recording, it can be downloaded here. For those who would like to skip to his longer poems, see the list below and the timestamp for where to find them. The poems I read are: Short Poems: Selections from “Song of Myself” Assurances Earth, My Likeness Full of Life Now To a Common Prostitute Mother and Babe O Me! O Life! Sparkles from the Wheel To Thee Old Cause! A Clear Midnight From Montauk Point America L. of G.’s Purport Give Me the Splendid Silent Sun Long Poems: Crossing Brooklyn Ferry (1:08:00) Song of the Open Road (1:26:00) A Song of the Rolling Earth (1:48:53) Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. Consider supporting Human Voices Wake us by clicking here. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
02:02:26
April 19, 2022
Walt Whitman's Death Poetry
Walt Whitman's Death Poetry
A reading of my favorite of Walt Whitman’s poems about death. All of them can be found in the two recent books I edited, The Selected Short Poems of Walt Whitman, and The Selected Long Poems of Walt Whitman. Please consider getting a copy of these books (they are only $3.99), if you enjoy what you hear in this episode. For those who want to skip ahead to the section longer poems, which are some of Whitman’s greatest, it begins at 39:00. The poems I read are: Short Poems: Selections from “Song of Myself” The Compost I Sit and Look Out Scented Herbage of My Breast Of Him I Love Day and Night As the Time Draws Nigh So Long! Not Youth Pertains to Me Old War-Dreams As at Thy Portals Also Death A Carol Closing Sixty-Nine As I Sit Writing Here Supplement Hours Long Poems: The Sleepers As I Ebb’d with the Ocean of Life Out of the Cradle Endlessly Rocking When Lilacs Last in the Dooryard Bloom’d Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. Consider supporting Human Voices Wake us by clicking here. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
01:56:16
April 14, 2022
Walt Whitman's Love Poetry // Whitman & Sex
Walt Whitman's Love Poetry // Whitman & Sex
A reading of my favorite of Walt Whitman’s love poems. All of them can be found in the two recent books I edited, The Selected Short Poems of Walt Whitman, and The Selected Long Poems of Walt Whitman. Please consider buying these books (they are only $3.99), if you enjoy what you hear in this episode. Following these poems (at 1:06:57), I have inserted a reading from a previous episode on Whitman’s love and sex life, from Paul Zweig’s book, Walt Whitman: The Making of the Poet. The poems I read are: Selections from “Song of Myself” To You Once I Pass’d through a Populous City Whoever You Are Holding Me Now in Hand Of the Terrible Doubt of Appearances Calamus #8 Calamus #9 When I Heard at the Close of the Day To a Stranger When I Peruse the Conquer’d Fame Thou Reader I Sing the Body Electric Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. Consider supporting Human Voices Wake us by clicking here. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
01:52:34
April 10, 2022
Advice from Toni Morrison, Richard Wilbur, John Berryman, T. S. Eliot // Whitman's Earliest Critics
Advice from Toni Morrison, Richard Wilbur, John Berryman, T. S. Eliot // Whitman's Earliest Critics
Another two part episode: In the first part, quotations on creativity come from Toni Morrison, Richard Wilbur, John Berryman, and T. S. Eliot. In the second part (starting at 24:17), I read selections from Walt Whitman’s earliest reviewers. The full text of these reviews can be found in Gary Schmidgall’s Selected Poems of Walt Whitman. The two pocket books of Whitman's poetry that I mention at the end are The Selected Long Poems and The Selected Short Poems. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. Consider supporting Human Voices Wake us by clicking here. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
57:30
April 06, 2022
Anthology: Poems by Lowell, Clare, Barbauld, Finch, Spenser // First Person: Eudora Welty & Helen Keller
Anthology: Poems by Lowell, Clare, Barbauld, Finch, Spenser // First Person: Eudora Welty & Helen Keller
Another two part episode: in the first, I read five poems: Robert Lowell (1917-1977), “Bobby Delano” John Clare (1793-1864), “An Invite to Eternity” Anna Laetitia Barbauld (1743-1825), “A Summer Evening’s Meditation” Anne Finch, Countess of Winchilsea (1661-1720), “A Nocturnal Reverie” Edmund Spenser (1552?-1599), from The Faerie Queen, Book 3, Canto 6 In the second (starting at 42:00), I read from Eudora Welty’s One Writer’s Beginnings, and Helen Keller’s The Story of My Life. Both, in their own way, are about each writer’s earliest discovery of words. As with many First Person segments, come from the pages of Lapham’s Quarterly, one of the best collections of voices from history that I know. Consider supporting Human Voices Wake us by clicking here. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
59:53
March 29, 2022
Loneliness, pt2 // Shakespeare, Sex & Sonnets
Loneliness, pt2 // Shakespeare, Sex & Sonnets
Another two part episode: The first is a brief sequel to an episode from last September, called Loneliness. (You can listen to that episode here) The second part (beginning at 19:19) is a reading from Peter Ackroyd’s biography of William Shakespeare—buy the book here. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
48:00
March 25, 2022
The Great Myths #17: Tales of the Elders of Ireland (Celtic)
The Great Myths #17: Tales of the Elders of Ireland (Celtic)
A reading of selections from The Tales of the Elders of Ireland (Acallam na Senórach). The translation I read from is that of Ann Dooley and Harry Roe. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
01:10:59
March 22, 2022
"That Jane Goodall Tramp" // So Long, Lawrence Ferlinghetti
"That Jane Goodall Tramp" // So Long, Lawrence Ferlinghetti
Another two-part episode: The first part is a scattershot on Jane Goodall’s appearance in Gary Larson’s The Far Side; my daughter’s reaction to hearing The Beatles’ “Revolution 9” for the first time; and thinking again about what Joan Didion taught me about jealousy, and what Leon Wieseltier’s 1996 book, Kaddish, can add to it. The second part (begins at 35:54) is a repeat from a 2/23/2021 episode, following the death of the poet Lawrence Ferlinghetti. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
50:21
March 14, 2022
First Person: Funeral Home Director // Telemarketer
First Person: Funeral Home Director // Telemarketer
Here are two readings from Gig: Americans Talk About Their Jobs. Beverly Valentine, Funeral Home Director Jason Groth, Telemarketing Group Supervisor Depending on the response, this might become a regular format for episodes going forward, putting two different episodes into one, simply for ease of listening. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
46:10
March 08, 2022
The Earliest Bookstores I Remember // Picasso's "Guernica"
The Earliest Bookstores I Remember // Picasso's "Guernica"
Tonight’s episode is split into two parts: In the first, I take up a listener’s request to talk about my memories of bookstores; In the second, I read from two recent books about Pablo Picasso’s Guernica. The books I read from are Simon Schama's The Power of Art and John Richardson's Life of Picasso, Volume 4: The Minotaur Years. The second part of the episode begins at 45:08. Depending on the response, this might become a regular format for episodes going forward, putting two different episodes into one, simply for ease of listening. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
01:20:51
March 02, 2022
Advice from Joan Didion, Stanley Kunitz, Billy Collins & Alice Munro
Advice from Joan Didion, Stanley Kunitz, Billy Collins & Alice Munro
A return to a series of podcasts that I haven't done since last year, where I take a quotation from another writer/artist/etc. on creativity, and just talk about it. Today's quotes come from essayist/novelist, Joan Didion, the poets Stanley Kunitz and Billy Collins, and the short story writer, Alice Munro. Preceding this is a few minutes of talking about how important it seems to be for an artist to be associated with a certain place--Dickens with London, Robert Frost with New England, etc. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
57:47
February 25, 2022
Jealousy, Part 2
Jealousy, Part 2
A sequel of sorts to an episode from last year, called Jealousy. In this episode, I talk about more recent mutations of the kinds of jealousy I've felt towards other writers and creative people, and what to do about it.  Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
31:17
February 21, 2022
The Great Myths #16: The Story of Taliesin (Celtic)
The Great Myths #16: The Story of Taliesin (Celtic)
A reading of the Welsh story about the poet and seer, Taliesin, as found in the mid-sixteenth century Hanes Taliesin. The translation I use comes from Patrick K. Ford's The Mabinogi & Other Medieval Welsh Tales. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
01:09:29
February 14, 2022
Anthology: Poems by William Blake, Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Louise Bogan, Anne Bradstreet, Henry Vaughan
Anthology: Poems by William Blake, Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Louise Bogan, Anne Bradstreet, Henry Vaughan
A reading of five poems: Louise Bogan (1897-1970), “The Alchemist” Elizabeth Barrett Browning (1806-1861), Sonnets from the Portuguese #41 (“I thank all who have loved me in their hearts”) William Blake (1757-1827), from Milton (“I come in self-annihilation”), from Jerusalem(“Trembling I sit day and night”) Anne Bradstreet (1612-1672), “The Author to Her Book” Henry Vaughan, (1621-1695) “The Book” Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
33:08
February 07, 2022
Anthology: Poems by Eavan Boland, Gerard Manley Hopkins, Wordsworth, Milton, Philip Sidney
Anthology: Poems by Eavan Boland, Gerard Manley Hopkins, Wordsworth, Milton, Philip Sidney
A reading of five poems: Eavan Boland, “The Making of An Irish Goddess” Gerard Manley Hopkins, “That Nature Is a Heraclitean Fire and of the Comfort of the Resurrection” William Wordsworth, “London, 1802” John Milton, ending to Paradise Lost Philip Sidney, “Loving in truth” Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
28:13
February 04, 2022
Ted Hughes: Selected Poems
Ted Hughes: Selected Poems
A collection of all of Ted Hughes’s poetry that I have recorded and posted here over the past year. They can all be found in his Collected Poems (smaller selections of his poetry include Selected Poems 1957-1994 and A Ted Hughes Bestiary). Rather than organizing my readings of Hughes’s poetry chronologically, I start with what seems to me his best poetry (and some of the best poetry in English, period)—that is, the poetry he published between 1970 and 1983. Only after these are his first three collections read from; the readings after that pick up his later career. A full table of contents can be downloaded here (it is too large to paste into the episode description). Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
04:33:38
January 31, 2022
T. S. Eliot's "The Waste Land"
T. S. Eliot's "The Waste Land"
A reading of T. S. Eliot’s 1922 poem, The Waste Land. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
29:46
January 28, 2022
Standing on Two Feet & the Evolution of Language
Standing on Two Feet & the Evolution of Language
A reading from a handful of sections from Steven Mithen’s book The Prehistory of the Mind: A Search for the Origins of Art, Religion and Science. (That book is an identical reissue to the one first published that I read, with a slightly different title, as The Prehistory of the Mind: The Cognitive Origins of Art and Science). Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
32:07
January 24, 2022
Seamus Heaney's Origin Story
Seamus Heaney's Origin Story
A reading of interviews with Seamus Heaney, on his discovery and growth into poetry from boyhood through university. As usual, these remarks come from Dennis O’Driscoll’s book-length collection of interviews with Heaney, Stepping Stones: Interviews with Seamus Heaney. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
36:44
January 21, 2022
Anthology: Poems by William Carlos Williams, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Emily Brontë, Alexander Pope, Roy Fisher
Anthology: Poems by William Carlos Williams, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Emily Brontë, Alexander Pope, Roy Fisher
A reading of five poems: The Entertainment of War, by Roy Fisher (1930-2017) Danse Russe, by William Carlos Williams (1883-1963) “The night is darkening round me,” by Emily Brontë (1818-1848) Work Without Hope, by Samuel Taylor Coleridge (1772-1834) Ode on Solitude, by Alexander Pope (1688-1744) Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
26:24
January 18, 2022
The Great Myths #15: The Pursuit of Diarmuid and Gráinne (Celtic)
The Great Myths #15: The Pursuit of Diarmuid and Gráinne (Celtic)
A reading from great Irish love story, The Pursuit of Diarmuid and Gráinne (Tóraigheacht Dhiarmada agus Ghráinne), versions of which go back at least to the tenth century, details of which inspired the later Romance of Tristan and Isolt. The literary version read from here dates to 1651.  The text I read from is the translation by Nessa Ní Shéaghdha, was published as volume 48 in the Irish Texts Society, Main Series. The text of other translations can be found here. A summary is on Wiki here. My essay on the boar can be found here. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
56:35
January 15, 2022
First Person: Rome (AD 64) and America (1832)
First Person: Rome (AD 64) and America (1832)
A reading from Seneca’s Letters to a Stoic, from c. AD 64; and from Alexis De Tocqueville’s Democracy in America, from 1832. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
23:51
January 04, 2022
Anthology: Is Poetry Important?, & Poems by Emily Dickinson, Shakespeare, Virgil, R. S. Thomas
Anthology: Is Poetry Important?, & Poems by Emily Dickinson, Shakespeare, Virgil, R. S. Thomas
The first eleven minutes of this episode are probably the best job I've done yet, talking about poetry's lagging popularity these days. For those would like to reverse this trend, I suggest that we ought to study the kinds of poetry that did have an immediate, popular, and lasting influence. Taking a look at why certain forms of folklore and myth last is also a good idea. In part, I'm responding to a remark from a poet whose tweet seems to have garnered more attention than she ever wished for. For this reason, I don’t name the poet who wrote the tweet, or link to it, because I don’t think it was meant to mistaken as a “public pronouncement.” As with other "Anthology" episodes, I then move on to read a handful of poems, each succeeding poem being older than the one before it: “Affinity,” by R. S. Thomas (1913-2000) #1142, by Emily Dickinson (1830-1886) Sonnet #27, by William Shakespeare (1564-1616) from The Aeneid, Book 6, by Virgil (70 BC - 19 BC) (translated by Allen Mandelbaum) You can join Human Voices Wake Us on Patreon, or sign up for our newsletter, by clicking here. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
28:51
January 01, 2022
First Person: Minnesota, c. 1900
First Person: Minnesota, c. 1900
A repeat of an episode from 11/27/2020.  A reading from Studs Terkel’s book, American Dreams: Lost & Found.  Here, Andy Johnson talks about his life in rural Minnesota at the turn of the twentieth century. The interview is also included in Terkel’s best-of volume, The Studs Terkel Reader.  Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
13:52
December 28, 2021
Anthology: Poems by Amy Lowell, Thomas Hardy, John Donne, Christopher Marlowe, William Cowper
Anthology: Poems by Amy Lowell, Thomas Hardy, John Donne, Christopher Marlowe, William Cowper
A reading of five poems:  “New Heavens for Old,” by Amy Lowell “The Darkling Thrush,” by Thomas Hardy “The Winter Evening,” by William Cowper “Death be not proud,” by John Donne “The Passionate Shepherd to His Love,”by Christopher Marlowe Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
27:33
December 25, 2021
Ted Hughes: 5 Last Poems
Ted Hughes: 5 Last Poems
A reading of five poems from Ted Hughes’s last book, Birthday Letters (1998). This is the book where Hughes finally addressed his relationship to Sylvia Plath in verse, nearly forty years after her suicide; in my introduction to the poems, I also talk about the strange phenomenon both of audiences demanding such a confession over a private matter, and the weight that Hughes said was lifted from him, when he finally published the book. All of the poems can be found in his Collected Poems. The poems are: A Pink Wool Knitted Dress You Hated Spain Drawing The Rabbit Catcher Life after Death Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
32:46
December 22, 2021
Anthology: Poems by Edgar Lee Masters, Tennyson, Mary Robinson, Henry Wotton, and Walter Raleigh
Anthology: Poems by Edgar Lee Masters, Tennyson, Mary Robinson, Henry Wotton, and Walter Raleigh
A reading of five poems from five different poets. They are: “Minerva Jones,” by Edgar Lee Masters (from his Spoonriver Anthology) “Ulysses,” by Alfred Tennyson “A London Summer Morning,” by Mary Robinson “A Hymn to My God in a Night of my Late Sickness,” by Henry Wotton “The Lie,” by Walter Raleigh Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
30:02
December 18, 2021
Ted Hughes: A Handful of Late Poems
Ted Hughes: A Handful of Late Poems
A reading of a handful of poems from Ted Hughes, published between 1986 and 1997. They can be found in his Collected Poems.  They are: Flowers & Insects (1986) Two Tortoiseshell Butterflies Sunstruck Foxglove Uncollected (1987-1989) Devon Riviera Wolfwatching (1989) For the Duration Take What You Want But Pay For It Uncollected (1992-1987) Mother Tongue Tales from Ovid (1997) Tereus Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
44:57
December 14, 2021
Ted Hughes: A Handful of Short Poems from the 1970s
Ted Hughes: A Handful of Short Poems from the 1970s
A reading of eleven short poems from a handful of books that Ted Hughes published during the 1970s. As I explain in the introduction, the period was one of creative flux for Hughes, and the collections that these poems come from are not always successful as books; however, there are magnificent poems to be found within them, and they are easily read outside the context of the books they were first embedded in. They can all be found in his Collected Poems. The poems are: Prometheus on His Crag (1973) #7 Gaudette (1977) I skin the skin Uncollected (1977-1978) New Foal Orts (1978) #1 #44 Cave Birds (1978) The Executioner A Green Mother Bride and Groom Lie Hidden for Three Days Adam & the Sacred Nine And the Phoenix has come Earthnumb (1979) Life is Trying to Be Life A God Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
39:21
December 07, 2021
First Person: London, c. 1615
First Person: London, c. 1615
A reading from chapter six of Peter Ackroyd’s history of early seventeenth-century England, Civil War (or Rebellion, as the book has been retitled in its America, apparently not to upset anybody buying it by accident and hoping to read about a different Civil War). Ackroyd uses two texts to paint a brief picture of London at the time: Thomas Dekker’s The Seven Deadly Sins of London (1607), and Ben Jonson’s play Bartholomew Fair(1614). Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
19:14
December 05, 2021
Ted Hughes: 6 Poems from Wodwo
Ted Hughes: 6 Poems from Wodwo
A reading of six poems from Ted Hughes's 1967 book, Wodwo, and one uncollected poem from the same time period. They can be found in his Collected Poems.  Wodwo (1967) A Wind Flashes the Grass Reveille from "Out" The Warriors of the North Heptonstall You Drive in a Circle from "Scapegoats and Rabies" (uncollected) Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
23:25
December 02, 2021
Eavan Boland: 5 Poems
Eavan Boland: 5 Poems
A repeat of a collection of episodes from last year, of five poems by the Irish poet, Eavan Boland. All of them can be found in her New Collected Poems (https://www.amazon.com/New-Collected-Poems-Eavan-Boland/dp/0393337308/) Quarantine Irish Poetry Lines for a Thirtieth Wedding Anniversary The Pomegranate Lava Cameo Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
12:07
November 29, 2021
First Person: Pompeii (AD 79) & San Francisco (AD 1906)
First Person: Pompeii (AD 79) & San Francisco (AD 1906)
An episode from 11/19/21, where I read about two disasters separated by nearly two thousand years: the eruption of Mt. Vesuvius in the year 79, and the earthquake that destroyed so much of San Francisco in 1906. A letter from Pliny the younger (read it here) describes Vesuvius and Pompeii, while an article by Jack London (read it here) takes us to San Francisco. I end with a reading of Laurie Sheck's poem "Pompeii," from her 2003 book, Black Series. You can join Human Voices Wake Us on Patreon, or sign up for our newsletter, by clicking here. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
24:22
November 19, 2021
How Did Picasso Do It?
How Did Picasso Do It?
Readings from a few books about Pablo Picasso, where he talks about how the power behind his own paintings, and his huge output, remained a mystery for him as much as anyone else. The first few quotations come from the huge Taschen book about Picasso that covers his entire life; the rest come from the multi-volume biography of Picasso by John Richardson: A Life of Picasso 1: The Prodigy: 1881-1906 A Life of Picasso 2: The Cubist Rebel: 1907-1916 A Life of Picasso 3: The Triumphant Years: 1917-1932 You can join Human Voices Wake Us on Patreon, or sign up for our newsletter, by clicking here Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
38:51
November 16, 2021
Louise Glück: 8 Poems from “The Wild Iris”
Louise Glück: 8 Poems from “The Wild Iris”
A reading of eight poems from Louise Glück's 1992 collection, The Wild Iris; followed by readings made last March, of six poems from her 1990 book, Ararat. Buy Ararat or The Wild Iris individually, or in Glück's Collected Poems 1962-2012.  from The Wild Iris Matins ("Forgive me if I say I love you") Retreating Wind The Garden Field Flowers Matins ("Not the sun merely but the earth") Vespers ("More than you love me, very possibly") September Twilight The White Lilies from Ararat Lost Love Appearances Brown Circle Child Crying Out Celestial Music First Memory Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
45:02
November 13, 2021
Episode #200: Some Thoughts on Success & Failure
Episode #200: Some Thoughts on Success & Failure
A reading, with comments thrown in throughout, of an essay of mine written between 2015-2016 (I get the dates wrong in the podcast). The entirety of it can be read here as There is Only the Trying: Some Thoughts on Fame & Failure. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
51:43
November 10, 2021
William Wordsworth: Immortality Ode, and 3 Other Poems
William Wordsworth: Immortality Ode, and 3 Other Poems
A reading of four poems by William Wordsworth: Ode: Intimations of Immortality from Recollections of Early Childhood London (1802): "Milton! thou should'st be living at this hour!" St. Paul's "It was an April morning: fresh and clear" (part 1 on "Poems on the Naming of Places" I read these here tonight to celebrate the release of a Selected Poems of William Wordsworth that I put together, and was just published. Other small books of poems (Whitman, Tennyson, and Frost) in the same series can be found here. If you'd like to support this podcast, buying a handful of these books would be the easiest way to do it--they are all around 120 pages, and all priced at $3.99. Click here to learn how to support this podcast. If you can recommend a similar story about how anyone discovered their passion, and would like me to read from, email me at humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
23:58
November 05, 2021
Ted Hughes Responds to Fame
Ted Hughes Responds to Fame
A reading of a letter written by the poet Ted Hughes, to friend and critic Al Alvarez, in November of 1971. At this time, Alvarez was publishing an intimate (and to Hughes's mind, exploitative) account of the 1963 suicide of the poet Sylvia Plath. The letter can be found in The Letters of Ted Hughes, pages 321-326.  I use this letter as a starting point to wonder why we treat the famous, or just the infamous, the way we do. The anecdotal knowledge of Ted Hughes's and Sylvia Plath's marriage and private life either turns the two of them into entertainment and anecdote, or it places the two of them onto the exaggerated plinths of Monster and Victim. This intrusion into private lives and private griefs, and the ease with which we, fifty years later, continue to lap up the gossip surrounding well-known people, and our own desire to turn people into symbols, should be an obvious parallel to Twitter and cable news. What if all of it just isn't any of our business? Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
42:40
November 02, 2021
The Great Myths #14: The Destruction of Da Derga's Hostel (Celtic)
The Great Myths #14: The Destruction of Da Derga's Hostel (Celtic)
In this seventh episode on Celtic mythology, I review one of the greatest surviving stories in the tradition, Togail Bruidne Dá Derga, or The Destruction of Da Derga's Hostel. Since it is also a fairly long story, I only share two small sections from the story itself: a piece from the beginning, and from the story's conclusion. You can read more about it here, or in the sources listed below. The translation I use here is by Jeffrey Gantz, in his indispensable book, Early Irish Myths & Sagas. As usual, I also make of from James MacKillop's Oxford Dictionary of Celtic Mythology, and his Myths & Legends of the Celts. For W. B. Yeats's 1888 narrative poem, The Wanderings of Oisin, check out Wikipedia. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work  presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or  other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work  presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I  will remove the episode immediately.
54:09
October 30, 2021
What Did "Collaboration" Mean in Nazi-Occupied Paris?
What Did "Collaboration" Mean in Nazi-Occupied Paris?
A reading of an essay of mine on cultural life and everyday life in Nazi-Occupied Paris. What did it mean to "collaborate," and what acts of collaboration were worthy of punishment or ostracism after the war? As one writer put it, “Should a woman reject a seat offered by a German in the Metro?  Should one have refused to receive civilized, non-Nazi Germans whom one had known before the war? Should one have turned one’s back on a German friend in a public place?” Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
39:27
October 27, 2021
Ted Hughes's Origin Story
Ted Hughes's Origin Story
A reading from the letters of Ted Hughes, on how he came to discover a love for poetry, the natural world, as well as folklore and mythology, and how all three became intertwined and essential to his life. The poet in question, whose name I don't reveal until the end, is Ted Hughes. The letters I read from here can be found in Letters of Ted Hughes. If you can recommend a similar story about how anyone discovered their passion, and would like me to read from, email me at humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
33:54
October 24, 2021
Advice from Walt Whitman & W. B. Yeats
Advice from Walt Whitman & W. B. Yeats
A reading of excerpts from the correspondence, notebooks, and interviews, with Walt Whitman; and a handful of excerpts from letters and memoirs of W. B. Yeats. For being such different poets, there's an awful lot of overlap, and it seems significant to include them in the same episode. The passage from Whitman can be found in the appendices of Gary Schmidgall's edition of Whitman's poems; the quotations from Yeats can be found in the first volume of R. F. Foster's biography of Yeats.  Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
49:05
October 20, 2021
Beethoven on His Deathbed
Beethoven on His Deathbed
A reading from Jan Swafford's Beethoven: Anguish & Triumph, narrating the last months of Beethoven's life. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
36:05
October 17, 2021
Poetry & Education in Eighth Century England
Poetry & Education in Eighth Century England
A reading of two chapters from Peter Ackroyd's book, Albion: The Origins of the English Imagination.  Chapter 5, "A Rare & Singular Bede," covers the life of the Venerable Bede, as well as education and culture in England in the eighth century. Chapter 14, "Anglo-Saxon Attitudes," is a brief look into Anglo-Saxon (aka Old English) poetry, and its continued life and reverberations in English poetry, through the present day. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
55:05
October 14, 2021
Working
Working
A small episode talking about working, and empathy and sympathy for those who live doing work they do not love, and which they derive little meaning from.   Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
41:12
October 11, 2021
Shakespeare, Wordsworth & a Guy from Pittsburgh
Shakespeare, Wordsworth & a Guy from Pittsburgh
A reading from Shakespeare's Hamlet and book 1 of Wordsworth's The Prelude. I also share two small sections from my poem-in-progress, 1606, about the life of Shakespeare. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
24:39
October 08, 2021
First Person: A Waitress in Chicago in the 1960s
First Person: A Waitress in Chicago in the 1960s
A reading from one of my favorite books, Studs Terkel's Working: People Talk About What They Do All Day and How They Feel About What They Do. Here, Terkel interviews a waitress named Dolores Dante. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
19:18
October 01, 2021
Ted Hughes: Ten Early Poems
Ted Hughes: Ten Early Poems
A reading of ten poems from Ted Hughes's first two books, The Hawk in the Rain (1957) and Lupercal (1960). They can be found in his Collected Poems. Another collection of Hughes's poetry that is mentioned in this episode is A Ted Hughes Bestiary, edited by Alice Oswald. The poems read here are: The Hawk in the Rain (1957) The Hawk in the Rain The Horses Wind Invitation to the Dance Six Young Men Lupercal (1960) Mayday in Holderness View of a Pig An Otter, pt. 1 November Uncollected Poems 1960-1967 My Uncle's Wound Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
31:38
September 30, 2021
Poem: Unfinished Michelangelo
Poem: Unfinished Michelangelo
A reading my poem "Unfinished Michelangelo." You can read the poem here. It was originally published at the Basil O'Flaherty. Learn about--and see--Michelangelo's unfinished slave sculptures here. The two books I mentioned in this episode are Howard Hibbard's biography of Michelangelo, and William Wallace's wonderfully illustrated Michelangelo: The Complete Sculpture, Painting & Architecture. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
16:37
September 28, 2021
Loneliness
Loneliness
An episode from 9/27/21: In what may be my favorite episode, I talk about loneliness: is it really so bad, and is easy sociability really so much better? I also look at where my own experience of loneliness began, as a four year-old who suddenly found himself with hearing problems. For the next eight years I underwent a handful of surgeries, which were always preceded by periods of deterioration in my hearing, and where I must have lived in near-total silence. I also locate my loneliness as a creative person, and what I have always done to fill it: rather than seeking out rooms filled with friends, I've been drawn towards interviews, anecdotes on nearly any subject, autobiographies, collections of voices and snippets from history and culture and society: what was life like in ancient Rome, how do parents today deal with "gifted" or "different/difficult" children, how did a certain band make a great album? It is all a part, as is my penchant for narrative poetry: the desire not to escape from people but to reach them, to bridge the silence of loneliness, even if it is "only" through listeners and readers. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
34:55
September 27, 2021
Myths & Lies
Myths & Lies
A reading from Mircea Eliade's book The Myth of the Eternal Return, where a folklorist discovers the source of a local myth and song, and tries to convince them of the "real" story. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
14:01
September 25, 2021
Virgil's Great Poem of Nature: Starting the Georgics
Virgil's Great Poem of Nature: Starting the Georgics
A reading from the beginning of Virgil great poem of farming and nature, Georgics, in the translation by David Ferry. There will be more readings from this book to come. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
07:51
September 23, 2021
Walt Whitman: “Give Me the Splendid Silent Sun”
Walt Whitman: “Give Me the Splendid Silent Sun”
A reading from Walt Whitman's poem, "Give Me the Splendid Silent Sun." This comes from the earliest published version, in the 1865 collection Drum Taps.  The best place to find Whitman's poetry online (or anything about him at all) remains the Whitman Archive, and you can find every edition of Leaves of Grass here (as plain text downloads) and here (facsimiles of the original editions). While there are hundreds of editions of Whitman's poetry in print, the best editions for me are Gary Schmidgall's Walt Whitman: Selected Poems 1855-1892, which present his best poems in their earliest published form (this is the book I am reading from here); the second includes the first and last editions of Leaves of Grass, along with a huge selection of Whitman's prose. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
09:06
September 21, 2021
2 Poems for the Holocaust
2 Poems for the Holocaust
A reading of two of my poems about the Holocaust, "A Ploughed Field" and "Train." These poems were published earlier this year at Jewish Journal. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
18:13
September 19, 2021
Isis in Old Age (story)
Isis in Old Age (story)
A reading of my story, "Isis in Old Age." It was originally published in Bold+Italic. The story can also be read here. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
24:32
September 17, 2021
Ted Hughes: 7 Poems from "Season Songs"
Ted Hughes: 7 Poems from "Season Songs"
A reading of seven poems from Ted Hughes's 1976 book, Season Songs. It can be found in his Collected Poems. The poems read here are: Spring Nature Notes (parts 5 and 6) Icecrust and Snowflake Sheep (part 1) Autumn Nature Notes (parts 2, 4 and 8) The Seven Sorrows A Cranefly in September Two Horses (part 3) Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
17:36
September 15, 2021
Walt Whitman Affirms the World
Walt Whitman Affirms the World
A reading from a small section of "Song of Myself." This comes from the earliest published version, in the 1855 Leaves of Grass, when "Song of Myself" was free of section numbers and good deal of editing. For those looking for this section in later editions, it ends up as part of section #33. The best place to find Whitman's poetry online (or anything about him at all) remains the Whitman Archive, and you can find every edition of Leaves of Grass here (as plain text downloads) and here (facsimiles of the original editions). While there are hundreds of editions of Whitman's poetry in print, the best editions for me are Gary Schmidgall's Walt Whitman: Selected Poems 1855-1892, which present his best poems in their earliest published form (this is the book I am reading from here); the second includes the first and last editions of Leaves of Grass, along with a huge selection of Whitman's prose. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
12:04
September 13, 2021
Poems: A Travelogue Through Orkney from "Bone Antler Stone"
Poems: A Travelogue Through Orkney from "Bone Antler Stone"
A reading of nine poems from the last section of my book Bone Antler Stone, on traveling through mainland Orkney. You can buy the book here, and read reviews and essays about the book here. The poems are: Pytheas in the Shetlands The Wanderer (Flight to Orkney) Walking Birsay to Swannay The Brough of Birsay (parts 1 & 2) Grain Earth House Bone Antler Stone (Orkney Museum) The Burn of Boardhouse & the Barony Mill Skara Brae The Wanderer II (Flight from Orkney) Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
44:11
September 12, 2021
The Great Myths #13: Oisin in the Otherworld
The Great Myths #13: Oisin in the Otherworld
In this sixth episode on Celtic mythology, I read the famous story of the wanderings of Oisin/Oisín in the Irish Otherworld, the Tir na nÓg. As usual, I make use of from James MacKillop's Oxford Dictionary of Celtic Mythology. The two versions of the story I read from can be found in James MacKillop's Myths & Legends of the Celts and Joseph Campbell's The Hero with a Thousand Faces. For W. B. Yeats's 1888 narrative poem, The Wanderings of Oisin, check out Wikipedia. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work  presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or  other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work  presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I  will remove the episode immediately.
22:37
September 11, 2021
Ted Hughes: 3 Poems from "River"
Ted Hughes: 3 Poems from "River"
A reading of three poems from Ted Hughes's 1983 book, River. It can be found in his Collected Poems. The poems read here are: Four March Watercolours After Moonless Midnight October Salmon Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
17:12
September 08, 2021
First Person: Vermont, 1940
First Person: Vermont, 1940
A reading from an interview conducted by the Federal Writer's Project during the 1930s and 1940s. The excerpt comes from the Winter 2019 issue of Lapham's Quarterly, but a larger collection of the interviews can be found in the 2004 book, Men Against Granite.  Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
09:10
September 07, 2021
Poem: Chauvet, Lascaux, Altamira
Poem: Chauvet, Lascaux, Altamira
A reading of my poem on the prehistoric painted caves of France and Spain, "Chauvet, Lascaux, Altamira," from the book Bone Antler Stone. You can buy the book here, and read reviews and essays about the book here. My favorite books on these caves are listed below. For some reason, many of them are hard to find or by now are inordinately expensive. The best general introductions to prehistoric art that are affordable include Prehistoric Art: The Symbolic Journey of Humankind, by Randall White, and Paul Bahn's Cambridge Illustrated History of Prehistoric Art. If you can find the following at your library, they are well worth a look: Lascaux: Movement, Space and Time, by Norbert Aujoulat The Cave of Altamira, edited by Pedro A. Saura Ramos Return to Chauvet, by Jean Clottes Becoming Human: Innovation in Prehistoric Material Culture, edited by Colin Renfrew and Iain Morley.  Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
22:18
September 05, 2021
The Great Myths #12: Queen Medb of Connacht
The Great Myths #12: Queen Medb of Connacht
In this fifth episode on Celtic mythology, I read the famous "pillow talk" between Queen Medb and King Ailill of Connacht. Their dispute over who owns more riches, land, and animals leads to the start of the famous Táin Bó Cúailnge/Cattle Raid of Cooley. The text of the story is taken from Thomas Kinsella's translation of The Táin. I also read a passage about Medb from James MacKillop's Oxford Dictionary of Celtic Mythology. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work  presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or  other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work  presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I  will remove the episode immediately.
21:08
September 04, 2021
First Person: Visiting a Poor Poet in Paris, 1895
First Person: Visiting a Poor Poet in Paris, 1895
A reading of Harry Kessler's diary from July 10, 1895, visiting the French poet Paul Veraline. From the English translation by Laird Easton, published as Journey to the Abyss: The Diaries of Count Harry Kessler, 1880-1918. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
13:16
September 02, 2021
Ted Hughes: A Bunch of Crow Poems
Ted Hughes: A Bunch of Crow Poems
A reading of nine Crow poems by Ted Hughes. The contents of Hughes's Crow collections, first published in 1970, vary widely; these poems are taken from his Collected Poems: King of Carrion Crow and the Birds Crow's First Lesson Crow Tyrannosaurus A Childish Prank Crowego Song Against the White Owl Crow's Courtship Crow's Song About God  Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
19:24
August 31, 2021
2 Poems: "Newgrange" and "Star Carr"
2 Poems: "Newgrange" and "Star Carr"
A reading of my poems "Star Carr" and "Newgrange" from the book Bone Antler Stone.  You can buy the book here, and read reviews and essays about the book here. Read about Star Carr and Newgrange on Wikipedia.  Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
08:49
August 29, 2021
The Great Myths #11: How Cuchulainn Got His Name
The Great Myths #11: How Cuchulainn Got His Name
In this fourth episode on Celtic mythology, I read the story of how the great Irish hero, Cúchulainn, got his name.  The text of the story is taken from Thomas Kinsella's translation of The Táin. I also read a passage about Cúchulainn from James MacKillop's Oxford Dictionary of Celtic Mythology. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work  presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or  other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work  presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I  will remove the episode immediately.
23:04
August 27, 2021
First Person: Paris, 1785
First Person: Paris, 1785
A reading from Louis-Sébastien Mercier's twelve-volume Le Tableau de Paris. The translation is from Helen Simpson's 1933 selection, The Waiting City: Paris 1782-1788. The excerpt comes from the Winter 2019 issue of Lapham's Quarterly. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
12:00
August 26, 2021
Cauldron & Drink (poem)
Cauldron & Drink (poem)
A reading of my poem "Cauldron & Drink," from the book Bone Antler Stone. This poem originally appeared in the Irish poetry journal Crannog. You can buy the book here, and read reviews and essays about the book here. Read about the Gundestrup Cauldron from c.200 BCE-AD 300 Denmark, and the Vix Grave from c.500 BCE France.  Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
07:14
August 23, 2021
Seamus Heaney: Selected Poems
Seamus Heaney: Selected Poems
A collection of all the poems by Seamus Heaney I have read here over the past few months, spanning his entire career. Each of his collections of poetry can of course be purchased on their own, but nearly everything I read here can be found either in his career-spanning 100 Poems, or in the two volumes of his selected poetry: Selected Poems 1966-1987 and Selected Poems 1988-2013.  Death of a Naturalist (1966) Follower Poem Personal Helicon Door Into the Dark (1969) Dream The Forge Bogland Wintering Out (1972) The Tollund Man Limbo First Calf North (1975) Belderg Funeral Rites Bog Queen The Grauballe Man Punishment Strange Fruit Kinship Field Work (1979) The Strand at Lough Beg from "Field Work" Station Island (1984) The Railway Children VII from Station Island VIII from Station Island The Scribes The Haw Lantern (1987) III from Clearances The Mud Vision Seeing Things (1991) Seeing Things 1.1.87 #2, #8 from Lightenings #15 from Settings #25, #27, #31, #32 from Crossings #40, #42, #45, #46 from Squarings The Spirit Level (1996) The Strand Postscript District & Circle (2006) A Shiver #1 from "District & Circle" A Hagging Match Human Chain (2010) Uncoupled Miracle from "Colum Cille Cecinit" from Hermit Songs from In the Attic from Heaney's translation of Beowulf Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
02:23:59
August 21, 2021
Seamus Heaney: A Handful of Late Poems
Seamus Heaney: A Handful of Late Poems
A reading of a handful of poems from the second half of Seamus Heaney's career. Aside from his book Seeing Things, his poetry doesn't seem nearly as powerful to me as his earlier work, and so it seemed best to sum up my favorite poems from his later life here.  The poems are:  Station Island (1984) The Railway Children Part VII from "Station Island" from The Spirit Level (1996) The Strand Postscript from District and Circle (2006) A Shiver Part 1 of "District and Circle" A Hagging Match from Human Chain (2010) from "Colum Cille Cecinit" from "Hermit Songs" And a final section from his translation of Beowulf You can buy the individual volumes, or find nearly all of these poems in the career-spanning 100 Poems. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
48:20
August 19, 2021
Week of the Bomb #4
Week of the Bomb #4
The last in a series of four episodes on the atomic bomb, from its development to the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, drawn from the words of those who were there. The full text of the quotations used here can be found in the blog versions of these podcasts. The books used to make these episodes are: The Making of the Atomic Bomb, by Richard Rhodes Dark Sun: The Making of the Hydrogen Bomb, by Richard Rhodes American Prometheus: The Triumph & Tragedy of J. Robert Oppenheimer, by Kai Bird and Martin J. Sherwin J. Robert Oppenheimer: Shatterer of Worlds, by Peter Goodchild. The book that comes to different conclusions than me, and which I hope to devote an entire episode to in the future, is A. C. Grayling's Among the Dead Cities: The History and Moral Legacy of the WWII Bombing of Civilians in Germany and Japan John Else's documentary, The Day After Trinity, can be watched here. John Bradley's anthology of poets writing about the bomb is Atomic Ghosts: Poets Respond to the Atomic Age. My essay, "Blindness, War & History," first published in the Concho River Review in 2014, can be read here. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
38:57
August 15, 2021
Week of the Bomb #3
Week of the Bomb #3
The third in a series of four episodes on the atomic bomb, from its development to the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, drawn from the words of those who were there. The full text of the quotations used here can be found in the blog versions of these podcasts. The books used to make these episodes are: The Making of the Atomic Bomb, by Richard Rhodes Dark Sun: The Making of the Hydrogen Bomb, by Richard Rhodes American Prometheus: The Triumph & Tragedy of J. Robert Oppenheimer, by Kai Bird and Martin J. Sherwin J. Robert Oppenheimer: Shatterer of Worlds, by Peter Goodchild. John Else's documentary, The Day After Trinity, can be watched here. John Bradley's anthology of poets writing about the bomb is Atomic Ghosts: Poets Respond to the Atomic Age. My essay, "Blindness, War & History," first published in the Concho River Review in 2014, can be read here. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately.
45:05
August 14, 2021
Week of the Bomb #2
Week of the Bomb #2
The second in a series of four episodes on the atomic bomb, from its development to the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, drawn from the words of those who were there. The full text of the quotations used here can be found in the blog versions of these podcasts. The books used to make these episodes are: The Making of the Atomic Bomb, by Richard Rhodes Dark Sun: The Making of the Hydrogen Bomb, by Richard Rhodes American Prometheus: The Triumph & Tragedy of J. Robert Oppenheimer, by Kai Bird and Martin J. Sherwin J. Robert Oppenheimer: Shatterer of Worlds, by Peter Goodchild. John Else's documentary, The Day After Trinity, can be watched here. John Bradley's anthology of poets writing about the bomb is Atomic Ghosts: Poets Respond to the Atomic Age. My essay, "Blindness, War & History," first published in the Concho River Review in 2014, can be read here. Any comments, or suggestions for readings I should make in later episodes, can be emailed to humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have thei