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My Culture Story with Kado Muir

My Culture Story with Kado Muir

By Kado Muir
Kado Muir is a cultural protocol custodian under Ngalia Aboriginal cultural ways. In this podcast series he shares insights, knowledge and stories to help create understanding and awareness that leads to opportunities for sharing and understanding across cultural spaces.
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My Culture Story with Kado Muir

My Culture Story with Kado Muir

My Culture Story with Kado Muir

My Culture Story with Kado Muir

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In this episode listen to a short story in Language.
Listening is an important part of learning. To learn a language one needs to become familiar and comfortable the idea of this episode is to give a short sound bite to create a familiarity with the language. Listen, listen and listen again until you hear the words.
03:03
March 28, 2021
Ep. 20 NAIDOC 2020 "Always was Always will be"
In this our twentieth episode Kado Muir shares some thoughts, comments and insights into NAIDOC 2020. Always was, always will be. What started in 1938 as a day of mourning on the 26th January has now been transformed into a week of celebration. The controversy of Australia day still haunts this nation but one of the first protests against it has been transformed into a week of celebration for all things Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, histories and cultures. Normally celebrated in July, this year we had to postpone and celebrate later in the year, so find ourselves celebrating NAIDOC week in November.  Right around Australia are many events and happenings, I’ve selected a couple here to share some resources so you can follow up and find an event near you. You can download resources and find further information at: The first and most obvious is to visit the NAIDOC website. NAIDOC https://www.naidoc.org.au/get-involved/naidoc-week-events go to SBS, where they have the official NAIDOC educational resource materials for teacher s to download and adapt for teaching and learning activities in the classroom. This is a great resource and should prove very useful this year. SBS  https://www.sbs.com.au/learn/resources/celebrate-naidoc-always-was-always-will-be/teacher-resource Show Sponsored by Marnta Sandalwood www.marntasandalwood.com/shop Before we go any further a word about our sponsor: This special naidoc episode is sponsored by Marnta Sandalwood, who are proud to be releasing their new line up of sustainable, Aboriginal owned sandalwood products including face and body splash, hand and body wash, massage oils, essential oils and pure sandalwood nut oil. Visit www.marntasandalwood.com/shop to find out more. ABC https://www.abc.net.au/indigenous/ You can’t get too far during NAIDOC week without watching or downloading a program or show on ABC indigenous. There is a great smattering of original an new material showcasing Indigneous Australia on ABC, go check it out. Well this was such a  short show today and for the first time in this episode, we at My Culture Story went to APRA AMCOS and paid for an Online Mini Licence Agreement. The good news is, we can now bring the occasional song into our episodes to showcase some of the amazing talent we have in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander music.  Today I am sharing a song from a young woman who made her debut last year in July 2019, she peaked at No. 4 on the ARIA Albums chart and is now touring and creating interest. Our fistr ever song on My Culture Story podcast is Thelma Plum with Better in Blak. Song for this episode Thelma Amelina Plumbe, known professionally as Thelma Plum, is an Aboriginal Australian singer-songwriter-guitarist from Delungra, New South Wales. Her debut album, Better in Blak, was released in July 2019 and peaked at No. 4 on the ARIA Albums Chart. Wikipedia  https://thelmaplum.com/ Sponsored by Marnta Sandalwood www.marntasandalwood.com/shop #NAIDOC2020
12:03
November 9, 2020
EP. 19 First Nations People and Ecological Change PART 2
Australia's Aboriginal and Torres strait Islander people's are not strangers to climate change. Major climatic events in Australia's prehistory were backdrops to the occupation and emergence of the various Aboriginal and Torres strait Islander cultures. This interchange between humans and the climate is represented in the archaeological record of Australia, particularly in the form of rock art paintings tools and evidence of occupation. That record lays out a scientific narrative showing how people adapted to changes in ecological systems for instance the development of harvesting grass seeds and the production of flour through the use of mortar and pestle grinding stones commences at the end of the pleistocene era ice age and beginning of the Holocene era. The adaptation to new foods resulted in York take of different health and well-being and you observance of spirituality and customs. Today Aboriginal and Torres strait Islander people's are faced with ecological emergencies, the first is as the result of dispossession of land and it's subsequent transformation through farming, mining and other human impacts. These impacts has resulted in a reduction in ecological integrity which directly correlates back to a reduction in Aboriginal health and well-being. Aboriginal and Torres strait Islander people are responding to these impacts through actions to prevent large scale mining activities like the Carmichael Basin project in Queensland and in the Torres strait people are having serious discussions about rising sea levels. Climate change is not new to Australia's indigenous people's unfortunately they have little opportunity to engage with the solutions and how in the past people were able to adapt and survive today the future is bleak. Join Kado Muir as he offers his thoughts and observations on the multiplicity of factors bearing down on how Aboriginal and Torres strait Islander people's engage with ecological transformations outside of the control. Question and Answer Session: 
37:53
November 6, 2020
EP. 18 First Nations People and Ecological Change PART 1
Australia's Aboriginal and Torres strait Islander people's are not strangers to climate change. Major climatic events in Australia's prehistory were backdrops to the occupation and emergence of the various Aboriginal and Torres strait Islander cultures. This interchange between humans and the climate is represented in the archaeological record of Australia, particularly in the form of rock art paintings tools and evidence of occupation. That record lays out a scientific narrative showing how people adapted to changes in ecological systems for instance the development of harvesting grass seeds and the production of flour through the use of mortar and pestle grinding stones commences at the end of the pleistocene era ice age and beginning of the Holocene era. The adaptation to new foods resulted in York take of different health and well-being and you observance of spirituality and customs. Today Aboriginal and Torres strait Islander people's are faced with ecological emergencies, the first is as the result of dispossession of land and it's subsequent transformation through farming, mining and other human impacts. These impacts has resulted in a reduction in ecological integrity which directly correlates back to a reduction in Aboriginal health and well-being. Aboriginal and Torres strait Islander people are responding to these impacts through actions to prevent large scale mining activities like the Carmichael Basin project in Queensland and in the Torres strait people are having serious discussions about rising sea levels. Climate change is not new to Australia's indigenous people's unfortunately they have little opportunity to engage with the solutions and how in the past people were able to adapt and survive today the future is bleak. Join Kado Muir as he offers his thoughts and observations on the multiplicity of factors bearing down on how Aboriginal and Torres strait Islander people's engage with ecological transformations outside of the control. *For adapted transcript of this story, and slides Visit https://www.myculturestory.com.au/post/first-nations-people-and-ecological-change
29:01
November 2, 2020
Ep.17 Daybreak at Bungalbin
In this episode Kado is visiting the Helena Aurora Range with activists who were instrumental in stopping a destructive iron ore mining operation which would have destroyed this natural and cultural wonder. It is dawn, the chorus of birds are calling as kado reflects on how extractive mining for resources often results in destruction of natural wonders. Find out more about Bungalbin by visiting this website. https://www.helenaaurorarange.com.au/
20:33
October 6, 2020
Ep. 16 Plea to Stop Destroying Aboriginal Sites
In this episode Kado shares the introductory comments he made to shareholders of BHP during a briefing session with the Australasian Centre for Corporate Responsibility (ACCR). This episode gives some insight and background into Aboriginal spiritual and cultural connection with country and how mining to extract resources by its very nature competes with these values. The challenge for all parties is to find a way to co-exist in a respectful and empowering relationship. The audio is an extract from the full video which can be viewed online at the following address https://youtu.be/qxPSGu9w6gI
16:11
September 25, 2020
Ep. 15 If its meant to be, its up to me
In this episode we interview Amanda Haas Lovitt a Councillor at the Shire of Harvey who was called to action when seeing the outrage and despair amongst Aboriginal people and their supporters brought about by the State Library of WA inviting a speaker to rehash white Australia policy speak under the guise of a disruptive ideas festival. Amanda responded to a comment posted by Nic Fardell, aspiring Nationals politician, on my facebook post saying one little thing that can be a major disruption is for more Shire Councils to employ Aboriginal people in administrative roles. Drawing in her grandmothers mantra of "if its meant to be, its up to me" Amanda has now created an employment opportunity at the Shire of Harvey for an Indigenous trainee. Taking action, taking responibility and seeing it through is Amanda's key lessons as she acts to be the change she wants to see in the world.
29:29
September 22, 2020
Ep. 14 Tjina parrani: walking for country | walking on country
Kado has just returned from hosting two weeks of a special meditation retreat on country, where two groups of between 12-14 people spent between 5-9 days walking, sleeping and in deep silence and personal reflection in the desert. In this episode kado shares his thoughts and insights on walking bare foot on sacred lands in the deserts of Australia.
15:55
September 14, 2020
Ep.13 Campfire Yarnz: Aboriginal Heritage Act (WA)
Kado shares a snapshot of some of his insights and background understanding of the Aboriginal Heritage Act (WA). All while laying in his swag looking up into the dark starry winters desert night.
29:16
June 16, 2020
Ep. 12 Marnta Sandalwood Story: www.marntasandalwood.com
In this episode Kado Muir talks to Allan Boyd of ECRadio about the Marnta Sandalwood Story. Discover the amazing Marnta Pulse Point sandalwood oil product at www.marntasandalwood.com/shop
09:43
June 12, 2020
Ep. 11 How the Echidna and Thorny Devil got thier spikes
In this episode the second of the series, Kado shares stories for My Culture story listeners as told to him around the campfire by his mother, when they lived in the desert and passed on stories in the timeless tradition around the campfire. This story was recorded as Kado shared these stories with Leonora school kids, around the campfire in a school Bush camp.
09:05
May 25, 2020
Ep. 10 Defending Country in the Deserts of Western Australia: Thoughts on History, Activism, Wealth and Culture.
Anthropologist, archaeologist, linguist and cultural leader Kado Muir, speaking at RMIT's Activism at the Margins conference on Tuesday 11 February 2020, at Capitol Theatre, Melbourne. "Real pearls of wisdom in this talk. Land is language and identity. Walking with a thought and intention. Walking and sharing an experience and learning together and as a way to resolve conflict. A way to engage with people and country. The interconnected (repercussive) nature of our lives (we are part of the same 'system'). Restitution is happening. Native Title is designed to legitimise dispossession. The importance of campaigns (social networks, people power and enforcing delays over trespassers). Intergenerational empowerment and knowledge transmission. Passing on integrity and value. Standing up and being counted. Creating law/lore and being creative. Engage in trade networks. Create art. Tell stories. Inspire and be inspired. Defend your country. Our planet. We only have one! I love this man's fierce intellect!" Positive comments from the organisers.  See Conference video here: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCdG0nTh8TU5nWnqg0Xv_xsw
32:19
March 3, 2020
Ep. 9 Discovery of Yilintji: matches for fire.
In this episode the first a series, Kado shares stories for My Culture story listeners as told to him around the campfire by his mother, when they lived in the desert and passed on stories in the timeless tradition around the campfire. This stort was recorded with Kado sharing these stories with Leonora schools kids, around the campfire in a school Bush camp.
09:11
January 31, 2020
Ep 8: unfinished business: My Culture Story Podcast
In this episode Kado Muir reflects on Australia's brutal colonial history and how it continues to influence modern Australian experiences.
09:31
November 5, 2019
Ep 7: Singing the Dawn: My Culture Story Podcast
In this episode of My Culture Story Kado shares memories of listening to his elders sing in the dawn, sharing and teaching cultural stories with everyone in the camp, with the fading stars as a backdrop, so everyone shares in an educational experience all before the sun rises.
12:23
September 29, 2019
Ep 6 Titarti: Birds of Leonora
My Culture Story looks at Ngalia knowledge of birds around Leonora, especially with the Birds of Leonora brochure. like this episode, want to support the Ngalia Foundation language work by following this link: https://enablr.org.au/charity/1461232356767788
10:46
August 29, 2019
Ep.5 The Elders Apprentice, Mundanarra Bayles
In this episode Mundanarra (Mara) Bayles, CEO of Black Card, joins Kado to talk about the Garma Festival in Arnhemland and shares her experience as a Cultural Apprentice working for her Elders.  Find out more about The Black Card, https://www.theblackcard.com.au/ Read the Transcript of Audio here!
13:29
August 6, 2019
Ep. 4 Three Ways You Can Learn an Aboriginal Language
My Culture Story podcast, episode 4 asks the question how can I learn an Aboriginal language? Three suggestions is to listen to music sung in an Aboriginal language, find the courses and immerse yourself in a community of language speakers, handy hint learn from the kids!
09:01
August 1, 2019
Ep.3 My Culture Story, Ten Bush Foods series: Karlkula
In this episode series we talk about Karlkula or marsdenia australis one of the Ten Bush Foods Kado showcases in his e-Book.
09:07
July 25, 2019
Ep. 2 Botany, biodiversity and culture on Country
In this Live Recording episode of My Culture Story Kado shares his perspectives on plants and culture with an audience of the Art Gallery of Western Australia as part of the Symposium: Framing Flora Artists & Science of Botany.
19:60
July 20, 2019
My Culture Story with Kado Muir
In this episode of My Culture Story, Kado Muir discusses why it is important to learn an Aboriginal language in Australia.
07:51
July 16, 2019