Loose, Vague, and Indeterminate

Loose, Vague, and Indeterminate

By George Mason Economics Society
Loose, Vague, and Indeterminate is the podcast of the Economics Society at George Mason University. The title is a phrase used by Adam Smith in The Theory of Moral Sentiments to describe the set of rules that are not "precise and accurate." Since economics is all about people and the decisions they make, very little of it is precise and accurate. Every Friday, this podcast dives into the looseness, vagueness, and indeterminacy with interviews of undergraduate students, graduate students, professors, and outsiders exploring economics from all angles.
Where to listen
Breaker Logo
Google Podcasts Logo
Overcast Logo
Pocket Casts Logo
RadioPublic Logo
Spotify Logo
Currently playing episode

Rosolino Candela on Price Theory

Loose, Vague, and Indeterminate

Go to next audioGo to next audio
Go to prev audioGo to prev audio
1x
Molly Harnish on Internships, Environmental Economics, and Fonts
Our guest is Molly Harnish, Econ Society webmaster emerita.  We discuss internships: what they are and how to get them.  We also discuss two research projects Molly is working on: one on private vs. public ownership in environmental economics and one on networks in Congress.  Listeners will learn lots of ways to get involved and make the most of their college careers -- and they will learn Molly's favorite and least favorite fonts.  James Talocka cohosts.  (This is the last episode of the semester; the first episode for second semester will come out on January 31.)
49:40
December 6, 2019
Rosolino Candela on Price Theory
Mercatus Center Associate Director of Academic and Student Programs Rosolino Candela joins the podcast to talk about price theory. In an example-filled episode, we discuss free parking at shopping centers, lighthouses and lightships in 18th-century Britain, and the sugar contents of Fanta. Dr. Candela also talks about who he considers the best price theorists: Mises, Hayek, Buchanan, Tullock, Alchian, and Demsetz. Marcus Shera cohosts.
56:57
November 22, 2019
Andrew Humphries on Teaching Economics
GMU Econ PhD student Andrew Humphries joins the show to talk about his passion for pedagogy.  We discuss Socratic teaching methods, dialogue in the classroom, and the discovery process of knowledge.  Andrew talks about how he learned to read and the best teacher he ever had.  Rajee Agrawal cohosts.
55:04
November 15, 2019
Nick McFaden's Post-Presidency Policy Palooza
Last year's president of Econ Society, Nick McFaden, joins the show to discuss what he's up to these days, presidential candidates, taxation, and antipoverty policy.  What does it mean to be a neoliberal?  Are reparations a good idea?  Greg Mankiw is #YangGang?  We go through those questions and more.  Marcus Shera cohosts.
59:11
November 8, 2019
Marcus Shera on New Institutional Economics and the Armenian Genocide
GMU econ student Marcus Shera joins the show to discuss a paper he wrote on the Armenian Genocide.  Inspired by his Armenian heritage, he used the tools of new institutional economics to analyze the genocide as a homogenization technology by the Ottoman Empire.  We discuss Ottoman history, Islamic law, and different kinds of religious toleration.  We also have a surprise guest.
52:44
November 1, 2019
Jon Murphy on Teaching Economics, the Nobel Prize, and What Economists Should Do
On Episode 4 of Loose, Vague, and Indeterminate, Rajee Agrawal joins me as cohost to talk to PhD student Jon Murphy. We ask Jon about his experience teaching introductory economics, international economics, and law and economics. We also discuss the recent Nobel Prize in Economics winners and the prize in general. Jon talks about what economists should do and retells a classic story about Ronald Coase at the University of Chicago.
54:50
October 31, 2019
Jacob Hall on Hume's History of England
Episode 3 of Loose, Vague, and Indeterminate is here! This episode’s guest is first-year Ph.D. student Jacob Hall. We discuss David Hume’s book The History of England and touch on political economy, theories of jurisprudence, and development economics. We also talk about what it’s like being in the first year of the GMU Econ Department’s Ph.D. program.
54:16
October 31, 2019
Hitchhiking and Hazlitt
On the second episode of Loose, Vague, and Indeterminate, I am accompanied in my hosting duties by Econ Society member George Minning as we interview Caleb Petitt.  Caleb is a fellow undergraduate at George Mason University who went on an exchange trip to Spain.  On that trip, he acquired one of the wildest stories you’ll ever hear about hitchhiking his way through Europe. Inspired by Henry Hazlitt’s famous book, George, Caleb, and I teach economics in one lesson using the hitchhiking story.  We cover marginalism, subjectivism, state vs. private ownership, and much more.
1:09:24
October 31, 2019
Daniel Klein on Smith's Theory of Moral Sentiments
“Loose, vague, and indeterminate” is a phrase from Adam Smith’s 1759 book, The Theory of Moral Sentiments (TMS). To explain what that phrase means, Prof. Daniel Klein, a Smith expert, is our first guest. We dive into TMS and talk about how scholars view the book, how Smith breaks down justice, and how the book relates to our lives today.
43:42
October 31, 2019