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The Clinical Research Podcast

The Clinical Research Podcast

By Research & Innovation
Getting to the heart of clinical research through the views of world-leading researchers, scientists and academics involved in answering the big questions about our health. From experimental medicine through to understanding common illnesses like asthma and arthritis, we discuss the latest research, what it means for our health and what scientific discoveries are next. This Podcast is brought to you by the Research & Innovation team at Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust. Follow us on @ResearchNUH and @NottmBRC, or email R&Icomms@nuh.nhs.uk.
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How do we detect breast cancer earlier?
One in eight women in the UK will be diagnosed with breast cancer, and like most cancers, the sooner it can be detected, the better the patient's prospects. That's why there's a national screening programme for women over fifty. which has been successful at cutting the mortality rate. But it's a one size fits all solution at a time where medicine is getting more personalised. Some breast tissue is denser than others, and the denser it is, the more likely it is to develop a cancer, and the more aggressive that cancer is likely to be. So anything that can help differentiate fom person to person what's going on, early on, will improve how effectively we can treat cancer.   Being able to use dye to help imaging is one of those ways, and Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust was one of the first hospitals to be able to to carry out contrast mammograms using dye. That expertise has meant we're part of the BRAID trial  the acronym in this case stands for Breast Screening – Risk Adaptive Imaging for Density and means we can offer it at early stage in the process.  Dr Elisabetta Giannotti, a consultant breast radiologist, is leading the trial at Nottingham. More information on the the BRAID study website: https://radiology.medschl.cam.ac.uk/research/research-themes/breast-imaging/braid-trial/  This Podcast is brought to you by the Research & Innovation team at Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust. Follow us on @ResearchNUH and @NottmBRC, or email R&Icomms@nuh.nhs.uk. If you haven't already, please subscribe to the podcast where-ever you get your podcasts, and like/review us on Apple Podcasts especially. It's For Science.
11:08
June 17, 2022
How do you ask research questions that numbers won't answer?
If your child was seriously ill enough that they had to take their nutrients through a tube into their stomach, you might assume as a parent, you'd follow everything medics told you to the letter. But a few years ago, doctors and nurses began to realise that rather than the prescribed commercial 'feed', a lot of those parents were giving their child real food - blended up. Researchers started to ask what the effect of this would be.  But for Professor Jane Coad, who's now head of Nottingham's Centre for Children and Young People's Health Research, there was a deeper question to ask. You can Prof Coad on Twitter at @CoadProfessor. This Podcast is brought to you by the Research & Innovation team at Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust. Follow us on @ResearchNUH and @NottmBRC, or email R&Icomms@nuh.nhs.uk. If you haven't already, please subscribe to the podcast where-ever you get your podcasts, and like/review us on Apple Podcasts especially. It's For Science.
13:32
June 10, 2022
Researching how we can help children in mental health crisis at hospital
When a child or young person comes to hospital in an emergency and mental health issues are clearly involved, how do we know how we can help them best? Health professionals can be unsure what to look for, what to do about they see, and how to judge how much they're helping the situation. Dr Joseph Manning MBE, a clinical academic nurse at Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust and NIHR lecturer at the University of Nottingham, is leading the SAPHE study which is researching how to make treatment of children and young people with mental health crises more effective and consistent. It's doing that by working **with** those children and young people. Joseph mentioned Prof Jane Coad, another of our researchers at Nottingham, and there's an interview with her coming up in and episode soon. Links SAPHE study website You can follow both @josephcmanning and Prof Jane Coad - @coadprofessor - on Twitter This Podcast is brought to you by the NIHR Nottingham Biomedical Research Centre. Follow us on @NottmBRC, or email Nottingham research. If you haven't already, please subscribe to the podcast where-ever you get your podcasts, and like/review us on Apple Podcasts especially. It's For Science.
16:33
May 27, 2022
Helping children and young people's mental health in hospital
When a child or young person comes to hospital in an emergency and mental health issues are clearly involved, how do we know how we can help them best? Health professionals can be unsure what to look for, what to do about they see, and how to judge how much they're helping the situation.  Dr Joseph Manning MBE, a clinical academic nurse at Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust and NIHR lecturer at the University of Nottingham, is leading the SAPHE study which is researching how to make treatment of children and young people with mental health crises more effective and consistent. It's doing that by working **with** those children and young people. Joseph mentioned Prof Jane Coad, another of our researchers at Nottingham, and there's an interview with her coming up in and episode soon. Links SAPHE study website You can follow both @josephcmanning and Prof Jane Coad - @coadprofessor - on Twitter This Podcast is brought to you by the NIHR Nottingham Biomedical Research Centre. Follow us on @NottmBRC, or email Nottingham research. If you haven't already, please subscribe to the podcast where-ever you get your podcasts, and like/review us on Apple Podcasts especially. It's For Science.
16:38
May 27, 2022
Becoming a better asthma researcher by asking people with asthma what they want
About one in eight people in the UK have asthma attacks and researchers at the Nottingham Asthma Centre (part of Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust) are studying how to stop the early symptoms of an attack turning into a serious event. We need volunteers to help us research the different triggers and symptoms, so we can find new ways to treat the condition and reduce the use of steroid tablets, which can have undesirable side effects. This study is about recording your breathing and other signs - we are not testing any new treatments and your current treatment won't change. If you are interested in taking part in this study, please contact Karen Shaw or Rob Needham at the Nottingham Asthma Centre Karen Shaw or Rob Needham , or visit nuh.nhs.uk/research. This Podcast is brought to you by the Research & Innovation team at Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust. Follow us on @ResearchNUH and @NottmBRC, or email R&Icomms@nuh.nhs.uk. If you haven't already, please subscribe to the podcast where-ever you get your podcasts, and like/review us on Apple Podcasts especially. It's For Science.
12:29
May 20, 2022
Understanding alcoholism and mental health stories
Alcoholism is one of the biggest factors in liver disease, and a dual diagnosis of alcoholism and mental health problems is very common  - it's more than solely a physical illness - so understanding how to support people as they recover from alcoholism is a really important way to help cut liver disease.  Mohsen Subhani is a clinical research fellow and a liver disease specialist at NIHR Nottingham Biomedical Research Centre, and he's the lead author on a newly published study in pulling together research on alcoholism and mental health in a new study. He and fellow researchers used a sample of eleven thousand studies to analyse the complicated interactions between mental health and alcoholism. Link to the study: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0268034 This Podcast is brought to you by the NIHR Nottingham Biomedical Research Centre. Follow us on @NottmBRC, or email Nottingham research. If you haven't already, please subscribe to the podcast where-ever you get your podcasts, and like/review us on Apple Podcasts especially. It's For Science.
13:57
May 12, 2022
What can the Covid-19 Zoe app tell us about future variants?
This interview with Professor Ana Valdes was done in February but we're only posting it now (in April) because it relates to a paper she co-authored which has only just been published in the Lancet Infectious Diseases. It's about covid and the Zoe app, and focuses on the omicron variant. Now government funding for the Zoe app's been stopped (though the app itself is still going strong) and omicron has been superceded by BA2, and in part thanks to this study, the official UK symptom list for covid has been updated. So as well as talking about the Lancet paper, I asked Professor Valdes about how viruses evolve over time and whether the laws of natural selection would tend to push them towards having less severe effects. But we started off with what made this study different to its predecessors.  Links Zoe App Lancet article Prof Ana Valdes This Podcast is brought to you by the NIHR Nottingham Biomedical Research Centre. Follow us on @NottmBRC, or email Nottingham research. If you haven't already, please subscribe to the podcast where-ever you get your podcasts, and like/review us on Apple Podcasts especially. It's For Science.
11:09
April 09, 2022
How bugs in your gut may help fight skin cancer
The contents of your stomach may not seem to have much to do with skin cancer, but one of our  studies seems to show that there are specific microbiome bugs which may be the key to treating melanoma more effectively with immunotherapy. Exactly how the microbiome helps us fight cancer is still a newish area of research and this study is one of the largest of its kind, with data from across the UK, the Netherlands, and Barcelona. It's just been published in Nature Medicine, and I talked to one of the authors,  Amrita Vijay, who's a research fellow at the University of Nottingham. The Nature Medicine article is here (may need a subscription): https://www.nature.com/articles/s41591-022-01695-5 This Podcast is brought to you by the NIHR Nottingham Biomedical Research Centre. Follow us on @NottmBRC, or email Nottingham research. If you haven't already, please subscribe to the podcast where-ever you get your podcasts, and like/review us on Apple Podcasts especially. It's For Science.
14:53
March 21, 2022
International Women's Day - our sexual health research
Good things come in small packages, as the saying goes, and this could certainly be applied to the sexual health research team at NUH. As well as seeing around 50,000 patients a year, they were the top recruiter in the trust in 2018, and have got over 150 patients on to a game-changing prophylaxis for HIV. Research and Innovation’s Andrew Bennett caught up with Dr Ashini Fox, who’s a consultant physician and research lead for the Sexual Health Team, and with Sarah Chadwick, who’s Clinical Nurse Specialist and Research nurse.
12:10
March 08, 2022
Join us on 8 March for International Women's Day
Find out how we're breaking down the barriers to better health for women everywhere.
00:30
March 07, 2022
Keeping patient data safe in our new BioResource
Research needs data and data needs - in the end - patients. Our researchers spend a lot of time Identifying the right patients for our studies, and more importantly, our patients spend a lot of time  helping us. The more efficiently we can  use the samples and other data they give us, the more we can help them. That's what the new Nottingham Bioresource is about - it pulls together samples and data from patients into one central bank, which is secure, controlled and confidential. Then we can help researchers identify the data they need, and let them access it in the most useful secure way possible. So everybody wins. That's the theory. To find out more, we talked to Jen Boston, Head of Research Governance and Quality at Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust, and to Natasha Hill, the bioresource operations manager -  who explained how it's going to help researchers. If you would like to give us your views about the use of data and tissue samples in clinical research then you can join the conversation now on the Research InSight website: https://researchinsight.org.uk This Podcast is brought to you by the Research & Innovation team at Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust. Follow us on @ResearchNUH and @NottmBRC, or email R&Icomms@nuh.nhs.uk. If you haven't already, please subscribe to the podcast where-ever you get your podcasts, and like/review us on Apple Podcasts especially. It's For Science.
13:04
March 03, 2022
What can a mechanical colon tell us about gastrointestinal medication?
One of the problems for treating gastro intestinal conditions is that it's hard to predict exactly how things dissolve in our guts. The food industry would dearly like to know more, and so would our gastro intestinal researchers, because if we knew how things fall apart in our colons, we can make drugs for conditions like Crohn's disease far more effective. But even with the latest imaging techniques that we use in Nottingham, it's difficult to see what's going on inside someone and for patients, it's uncomfortable. So - that's why we're use a mechanical colon, made by colleagues at @NIHRBhamBRC in Birmingham. Dr Luca Marciani, Professor in Gastrointestinal Imaging at Nottingham Biomedical Research Centre, told me about the project. This Podcast is brought to you by the NIHR Nottingham Biomedical Research Centre. Follow us on @NottmBRC, or email Nottingham research. If you haven't already, please subscribe to the podcast where-ever you get your podcasts, and like/review us on Apple Podcasts especially. It's For Science.
10:58
February 17, 2022
Tinnitus Week with Prof David Baguley
This week is #tinnitusweek, organised by @BritishTinnitus. But for the ten percent of the population who have the condition - every week is tinnitus week.  I talked to @DrDavidBaguley, who's a Professor of Hearing Sciences at the University of Nottingham and heads up the Clinical Hearing Sciences group within the NIHR Nottingham Biomedical Research Centre (@hearingnihr), about the the research he and colleagues are doing into the condition.  More information NIHR Nottingham Biomedical Research Centre hearing theme British Tinnitus Association and Tinnitus Week This Podcast is brought to you by the NIHR Nottingham Biomedical Research Centre. Follow us on @NottmBRC, or email Nottingham research. If you haven't already, please subscribe to the podcast where-ever you get your podcasts, and like/review us on Apple Podcasts especially. It's For Science.
21:55
February 10, 2022
The four things you need to make a difference in clinical research
How can you make a difference as a clinical researcher? University of Nottingham respiratory medicine professor and NHS consultant, Dominick Shaw, talks to Matt Hurst about the four things you need to when you're starting out.  Read more on his blog post at 50 at 50: Standing on the shoulders of giants This Podcast is brought to you by the Research & Innovation team at Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust. Follow us on @ResearchNUH and @NottmBRC, or email R&Icomms@nuh.nhs.uk. If you haven't already, please subscribe to the podcast where ever you get your podcasts, and like/review us on Apple Podcasts especially. It's for Science.
23:32
January 21, 2022
Health, data, and research
How we make the most of their huge capacity for data, and processing, and artificial intelligence and the issues they  might bring is actually the bit that is increasingly important these days, and this episode is a discussion about what Nottingham data scientists are doing in that area. You'll hear  Phil Quinlan, who's the head of Digital Research Service at the University of Nottingham, and Associate Director at Health Data Research UK Dr Louise Bramley, Head of Nursing and Midwifery Research and Innovation at Nottingham University Hospitals Dr Sam Cox, who's a Senior Research Software Engineer at the University of Nottingham  Grazziela Figueredo, a Senior Research Data Scientist at the university of Nottingham Hannah Jackson, who's an NIHR Pre Doctoral Clinical Academic Fellow - researches nursing informatics Nottingham University Hospitals, University of Nottingham and Health Research Data UK are launching a new discussion programme around the use of data in our research. Research Insight will be launched in January 2022 and will invite contributions from the public, patients, researchers and industry on developing safer ways of working with data, the best tools to support research projects and enabling innovation by use of data This Podcast is brought to you by the Research & Innovation team at Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust. Follow us on @ResearchNUH and @NottmBRC, or email R&Icomms@nuh.nhs.uk. If you haven't already, please subscribe to the podcast where-ever you get your podcasts, and like/review us on Apple Podcasts especially. It's For Science.
36:50
January 10, 2022
Research Hero Zoe Rose (CW - suicide mentions)
For obvious and unavoidable reasons, all the research heroes experiences this year have been about dealing with Covid, but this particular hero had something else going on. Before Covid, Zoe Rose, was a research nurse in gastroenterology, but she was also coping with a personal tragedy of her own. Looking back on it now, she talks about how  the intensity of the work during that first wave, and the help of a supportive team around her, help her find a way towards her own recovery.  It's a really thoughtful and thought provoking interview, and Zoe talks very openly about her own mental health and how knowing she was able to help other people helped her.  Now she works in the the Rapid Response Team, handling research across many specialisms at NUH - it's the R and I version of special forces. Content warning - there's some discussion of suicide in this episode.  If you're affected by issues in the episode you can find help on: https://www.samaritans.org https://www.nhs.uk/mental-health/feelings-symptoms-behaviours/behaviours/help-for-suicidal-thoughts/ This Podcast is brought to you by the Research & Innovation team at Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust. Follow us on @ResearchNUH and @NottmBRC, or email R&Icomms@nuh.nhs.uk. If you haven't already, please subscribe to the podcast where-ever you get your podcasts, and like/review us on Apple Podcasts especially. It's For Science.
12:14
December 23, 2021
Big data in Covid-19
'Big data' is often a bogeyman term, but at the start of the Covid-19 outbreak, reworking how we used data helped keep Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust running, and our radiologists were at the forefront of pioneering diagnostic techniques. Interviewees Dr Andrew Fogarty, NUH chest medicine physician and University of Nottingham epidemiologist Dr Mark Simmonds, who had just taken up to the role of divisional director for Medicine at NUH a few weeks before the pandemic struck Dr Iain Au-Yong, consultant radiologist at NUH Dr Tim Card, gastroenterologist at NUH gastroenterologist and University of Nottingham clinical epidemiologist They also mention two epidemiologists on the team from the University of Nottingham - Professor Joe West, and Professor Colin Crooks.  You can listen to interviews with more of our leading scientists, clinicians and academics by subscribing to The Clinical Research Podcast on your favourite Podcast app. This Podcast is brought to you by the Research & Innovation team at Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust. Follow us on @ResearchNUH and @NottmBRC, or email R&Icomms@nuh.nhs.uk. If you haven't already, please subscribe to the podcast where-ever you get your podcasts, and like/review us on Apple Podcasts especially. It's For Science.
12:24
December 16, 2021
How cultural awareness should change clinical research - and researchers
This week our guest is Professor Guru Aithal, Deputy Director of the NIHR Nottingham Biomedical Research Centre and a world-leading researcher in gastrointestinal and liver disorders. Professor Aithal talks to Matt Hurst from Research & Innovation about how science and his own personal experiences have shaped his views on why every researcher needs to build trust with ethnic communities. In a wide-ranging conversation Professor Aithal gives his perspective on the lasting legacy of historic unethical research practices, the impact of Black Lives Matter, COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy and health inequalities. He draws on his own research in the UK and in India into the impact of diet on gastrointestinal health and also the significant inequality in rates of premature death from liver disease in different populations. For more information about Professor Aithal's research please visit: www.nottinghambrc.nihr.ac.uk/research/gastrointestinal-liver You can listen to interviews with more of our leading scientists, clinicians and academics by subscribing to The Clinical Research Podcast on your favourite Podcast app. If you enjoyed this episode then please rate, review and subscribe. This will help others to find our Podcast and raise awareness of clinical research. Do it for the science.  
15:17
November 12, 2021
Research Heroes - the Children's Research Team
Our guest this episode is Helen Navarra from the Children's Research Team at Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust. Helen is in conversation with Andrew Bennett and explains how COVID-19 changed everything for families taking part in clinical research at our hospitals. Helen herself is one of several members of the Children's Research Team, as well as the whole team and the work they did in partnership with the Cripps Health Centre in Nottingham, who received multiple nominations in our COVID-19 Research Heroes Awards last year. Helen explains the support they were able to give to children, young people and families which enabled them to take part in COVID-19 research.  You can listen to interviews with some of our other COVID-19 Research Heroes, and many more people speaking about their research, by subscribing to The Clinical Research Podcast on your favourite Podcast app. This will help the work of heroes like the Children's Research Team get to a wider audience and to spread the word about research more generally.  Thank you.
12:07
November 05, 2021
Redthread youth violence intervention programme
An introduction to a report on a joint project between Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust (and the Major Trauma Centre it hosts), and national charities Redthread and the Health Foundation. Violent crime victims are often caught up in a lifestyle that's going to see them returning to Nottingham's emergency department over and over again, often with more and more serious injuries. It's not just a healthcare issue, it's also about law and order, safeguarding and social care.  But while we're treating their injuries, there's also a chance to break that repeated pattern. Nottingham University Hospitals sees a lot of victims of violence, partly because it's in a big city, but also because it hosts the Major Trauma Centre for the East Midlands region. We've been working with Redthread and the Health Foundation on how we can bring together healthcare, law and order, and social care, and we've just published a report on what we found. This report has been written independently under the guidance of The Health Foundation, an independent charity committed to bringing about better health and health care for people in the UK. Other links: The Health Foundation Redthread East Midlands Major Trauma Centre This Podcast is brought to you by the Research & Innovation team at Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust. Follow us on @ResearchNUH and @NottmBRC, or email R&Icomms@nuh.nhs.uk. If you haven't already, please subscribe to the podcast where ever you get your podcasts, and like/review us on Apple Podcasts especially. It's for science.
12:30
October 21, 2021
Kathryn Fairbrother, Head of Nursing Research & Innovation
Kathryn Fairbrother is the new Head of Nursing for Research & Innovation at Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust.  In this episode of The Clinical Research Podcast she talks about what inspired her as a nurse to get involved in clinical research and how she is hoping to now inspire other nurses - and healthcare professionals - to embark on their own research careers. Kathryn is in conversation with Matt Hurst from the Research & Innovation Communications Team. The Clinical Research Podcast is written and produced by the Research & Innovation team at Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust. To find out more about our research please visit: www.nuh.nhs.uk/research or follow us on Twitter @ResearchNUH. You can email us at: R&IComms@nuh.nhs.uk If you haven't already, please subscribe to the podcast where ever you get your podcasts, and like/review us as this helps other people to find our episodes. It's for science.
18:47
September 24, 2021
Research Hero - Laura Looby
This episode's Research Hero is Laura Looby a children's clinical research nurse - normally. Fairly early on in the Covid outbreak it became clear that relatively few children were being affected so she was drafted to help with adult covid patients many of whom were at the other end of the age spectrum. She mentions 'dex' at one point. That's dexamethasone, one of the drugs trialled against Covid-19 early on, which turned out to be so effective it very quickly became part of the standard treatment. it's a really clear example of how research can lead to clinical treatment and researchers talk about it a lot. This Podcast is brought to you by the Research & Innovation team at Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust. Follow us on @ResearchNUH and @NottmBRC, or email R&Icomms@nuh.nhs.uk. If you haven't already, please subscribe to the podcast where-ever you get your podcasts, and like/review us on Apple Podcasts especially. It's For Science.
08:08
August 24, 2021
Pulmonx trial into emphysema treatment
In the UK, about 1.3 million people are living with COPD - chronic obstructive pulmonary disease - , and there's no cure - but there's a lot of research into its treatment. In one type of COPD, emphysema, disease destroys alveoli in the lung so they can't transfer oxygen into the blood. It doesn't just mean there's less working lung, it means the now useless lung is taking up chest space so the patient can't inhale as deeply as they need to in order to get sufficient oxygen to the remaining working alveoli. So treatment often focuses on creating space in the chest so that patients can inhale more deeply - that means either surgery, or finding a way to make the emphysematic lung tissue take up less space. And either of those approaches have their own complications. Respiratory consultant Sam Kemp has recently joined Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust and part of his work is testing a new technique with the potential to help patients with condition, working with US company Pulmonx. This Podcast is brought to you by the Research & Innovation team at Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust. Follow us on @ResearchNUH and @NottmBRC, or email R&Icomms@nuh.nhs.uk. If you haven't already, please subscribe to the podcast where-ever you get your podcasts, and like/review us on Apple Podcasts especially. It's For Science.
12:42
August 17, 2021
How does group membership help psychosis recovery?
Ask most people who they are, and they'll talk about their job, their likes and dislikes, their appearance. But there's another way of defining your identity - by the groups of people you mix with. We're a social species and who we choose to be with affects how we see the world, and ourselves. It can be a vital part of mental health. That's why occupational therapist and researcher Emilia Deakin chose to study how people with psychosis interact with the groups as they recover, for a study for her PhD, called UNFOLD. And then lockdown happened, and all of the normal social groups stopped. She told me how she solved the problem. As of August 2021, UNFOLD is still recruiting, so if you'd like to know more about it you can email emilia.deakin@nottingham.ac.uk. There's more infomation on the study website, https://www.researchintorecovery.com/research/unfold/  This Podcast is brought to you by the Research & Innovation team at Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust with the NIHR Nottingham Biomedical Research Centre. Follow us on @ResearchNUH and @NottmBRC, or email R&Icomms@nuh.nhs.uk. If you haven't already, please subscribe to the podcast where-ever you get your podcasts, and like/review us on Apple Podcasts especially. It's For Science.
12:29
August 09, 2021
Gastrointestinal and Liver Disorder research in Nottingham
Clinical research is very much about collaboration, which means it can often also be very much about lots of organisations, with lots of initials. We try not to burrow too deeply into that particular rabbit hole unless we really have to, but for this episode - we really have to. Rather than people or particular studies, It's about plans for the future of clinical research in Nottingham, which means understanding a little bit of how all the parts fit together. You'll hear four people - in order, hepatology Professor Guru Aithal, then Professor Penny Gowland who is part of the MR imaging team, then Neil Guha, who's a hepatology professor, and Dr Gordon Moran, who's an associate professor of gastro enterology. A couple of the team mention some work by a colleague called Luca. That's Professor Luca Marciani, whose study called MAGIC helps treat constipation in children by using isotopic markers to track food moving through their digestive systems. Show links National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) NIHR Nottingham Biomedical Research Centre (BRC) NIHR Nottingham BRC Gastointestinal and Liver Disorder Theme Professor Luca Marciani and the MAGIC study Professor Aithal started by talking about how funding was focused in specific research areas.
35:05
July 28, 2021
Allied Health Professionals leading clinical research
Increasingly clinical research is being led by a broader range of clinical professionals - but there is more to do to encourage physiotherapists, healthcare scientists and every profession to make research part of their careers. In this episode Vicky Booth, a physiotherapist from Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust explains to Matt Hurst of the Research & Innovation department how working with falls patients who also had dementia led her to develop her own career as a clinical academic.  Vicky is currently an Assistant Professor at the University of Nottingham School of Medicine specialising in rehabilitation research. She is also one of the Allied Health Professional Clinical Academic Co-Leads at Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust supporting the capacity and capability development of clinical academic careers in the hospital's AHP workforce. Vicky talks to us about how she is now working with other clinical academic leads in Nottingham to encourage others to follow their own route into clinical research and ultimately better care for patients. This Podcast is brought to you by the Research & Innovation team at Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust. Follow us on @ResearchNUH and @NottmBRC, or email R&Icomms@nuh.nhs.uk. If you haven't already, please subscribe to this podcast where ever you get your podcasts, and like/review us to help others find our about clinical research. It's for science.
15:00
July 20, 2021
Research Hero - John Sweeney
John Sweeney is a cleaner working at Nottingham City Hospital who was nominated for an award by the Respiratory Research Team for his part in supporting them on a number of COVID-19 research studies in 2020.  But in turns out that not only is John a genuine NHS hero, he also has a pretty inspirational story about how he came to be working at the Hospital at all. He tells his remarkable life story to Matt Hurst from Research & Innovation.  This episode is a tribute to the countless unsung heroes who together combine to make clinical research possible. It is also a tribute to everyone who "lives for the day". Thank you to John. Find out more about our COVID-19 Research Heroes online.  This Podcast is brought to you by the Research & Innovation team at Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust. Follow us on @ResearchNUH and @NottmBRC, or email R&Icomms@nuh.nhs.uk. If you haven't already, please subscribe to the podcast where ever you get your podcasts, and like/review us to help others find our about clinical research. It's for science.
06:51
July 08, 2021
Research Hero - Irfan Aslam
Our research hero this time is one of the people who helps set up studies in Nottingham, research facilitator Irfan Aslam.  Later in the pandemic, he took on co-ordinating the Virus Watch study in Nottingham, which gave one of the early hints of just how important asymptomatic infection was going to be, but as he told Andrew Bennett - at the beginning, his job switched from working on a range of studies to focussing on just one thing - covid. This Podcast is brought to you by the Research & Innovation team at Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust. Follow us on @ResearchNUH and @NottmBRC, or email R&Icomms@nuh.nhs.uk. If you haven't already, please subscribe to the podcast where-ever you get your podcasts, and like/review us on Apple Podcasts especially. It's For Science.
09:05
July 01, 2021
Red4Research
Staff, patients, and just about anyone else who wants to, at Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust will be wearing red today (18 June 2021). They're joining thousands of people across the world showing their support for the huge international research effort which brought us vaccines and treatment for covid-19so quickly. It's the second year that June 18th has been marked as Red4Research day, and Divisional Lead Research Nurse Nicola Hall told Ash Rolfe about why red is such an important colour for researchers at the hospital. More info on #Red4Research at https://rdforum.nhs.uk/red4research/ This Podcast is brought to you by the Research & Innovation team at Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust - www.nuh.nhs.uk/research. Follow us on @ResearchNUH and @NottmBRC, or email R&Icomms@nuh.nhs.uk. If you haven't already, please subscribe to the podcast where-ever you get your podcasts, and like/review us on Apple Podcasts especially. It's For Science. You can also find our podcasts on https://www.nuh.nhs.uk/clinical-research-podcast/ or Spotify. 
10:09
June 18, 2021
Diabetes Week and fatty liver disease
This week is Diabetes Week so I've been speaking to Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust hepatologist Professor Guru Aithal, whose research includes investigating fatty liver disease. Research is showing that diabetes and fatty liver disease have the kind of relationship where if they were in the same class at school, you'd separate them to stop them egging each other on. We talked about how that relationship works, as well as how a better understanding of genetics means we'll be much more able to predict who'll respond to what kind of treatment, and why we need a genetic database that isn't so skewed towards western ethnicities. More information on Diabetes Week at the Diabetes UK website. Prof Guru Aithal is the Gastrointestinal and Liver Disorders lead at the NIHR Nottingham Biomedical Research Centre, and a professor at the University of Nottingham. This Podcast is brought to you by the Research & Innovation team at Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust - www.nuh.nhs.uk/research. Follow us on @ResearchNUH and @NottmBRC, or email R&Icomms@nuh.nhs.uk. If you haven't already, please subscribe to the podcast where-ever you get your podcasts, and like/review us on Apple Podcasts especially. It's For Science. You can also find our podcasts on https://www.nuh.nhs.uk/clinical-research-podcast/ or Spotify.
12:25
June 17, 2021
Research Hero - Lucy Ryan
In the latest of our interviews with winners of our Research Heroes awards, Andrew Bennett talks to clinical research manager Lucy Ryan, who works on the DREEAM team at Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust. DREEAM is the Department of Research and Education in emergency and acute medicine at the hospital, and Lucy and her team were heavily involved with covid patients, especially collecting data for a study called ISARIC which became a key resource for fighting the virus. Links DREEAM ISARIC This Podcast is brought to you by the Research & Innovation team at Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust. Follow us on @ResearchNUH and @NottmBRC, or email R&Icomms@nuh.nhs.uk.  If you haven't already, please subscribe to the podcast where-ever you get your podcasts, and like/review us on Apple Podcasts especially. It's For Science.
13:19
June 10, 2021
Glaucoma treatment - TAGS study
Glaucoma is when the optic nerve is damaged, generally by high pressure in the eye, and it's treated by lowering that pressure to minimise any further damage. This episode looks at research into advanced glaucoma treatment, and a study called TAGS (the Treatment of Advanced Glaucoma Study). It's led by Professor Anthony King, Consultant Ophthalmologist at Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust and it's investigating whether it's better to treat glaucoma with eyedrops or with surgery. TAGS study This Podcast is brought to you by the Research & Innovation team at Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust. Follow us on @ResearchNUH and @NottmBRC, or email R&Icomms@nuh.nhs.uk. If you haven't already, please subscribe to The Clinical Research Podcast where ever you get your podcasts, and like/review us so that other people can find us. It's for science.
11:42
June 08, 2021
Research Hero - Georgia Melia
Last year, research practitioner Georgia Melia had to learn new skills on her feet as she was moved to the lab from patient wards, as part of our work on Covid-19 research. Andrew Bennett spoke to her about big change in her working life. This Podcast is brought to you by the Research & Innovation team at Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust - www.nuh.nhs.uk/research. Follow us on @ResearchNUH and @NottmBRC, or email R&Icomms@nuh.nhs.uk. If you haven't already, please subscribe to the podcast where-ever you get your podcasts, and like/review us on Apple Podcasts especially. It's For Science. You can also find our podcasts on https://www.nuh.nhs.uk/clinical-research-podcast/ or https://anchor.fm/nottmresearch
07:38
June 03, 2021
Research Heroes - Lindsay Crate
Lindsay Crate is a nurse by background, but now her role is about making sure that studies run smoothly - that  there are enough staff, they're properly trained, they understand research protocols and that we're recruiting enough patients. Amongst other things. She's a clinical research manager. Normally, planning is the key to all this - but when Covid-19 hit, planning joined the long list of things that became a luxury, and everything changed. This Podcast is brought to you by the Research & Innovation team at Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust - www.nuh.nhs.uk/research. Follow us on @ResearchNUH and @NottmBRC, or email R&Icomms@nuh.nhs.uk. If you haven't already, please subscribe to the podcast where-ever you get your podcasts, and like/review us on Apple Podcasts especially. It's For Science. You can also find our podcasts on https://www.nuh.nhs.uk/clinical-research-podcast/ or https://anchor.fm/nottmresearch
11:16
June 01, 2021
Research Hero - Kebba Konteh
Known as 'The Blood God' for his unerring ability to get a sample from even the most elusive of veins, clinical research practitioner Kebba Konteh puts his skill down to his own fear of needles - he knows how to put patients at ease. Now on the Core COVID-19 Research Team at the NIHR Clinical Research Facility at Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust, he's worked at NUH for nearly 20 years.  This Podcast is brought to you by the Research & Innovation team at Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust. Follow us on @ResearchNUH and @NottmBRC, or email R&Icomms@nuh.nhs.uk. Find out more about research and innovation at NUH at www.nuh.nhs.uk/research. If you haven't already, please subscribe to the podcast where-ever you get your podcasts, and like/review us on Apple Podcasts especially. It's For Science.
07:09
May 25, 2021
Research Heroes - Kate Frost
It's a given - now - that good study design means a process of involving patients at every step, from the big questions like 'what shall we investigate', to the how and where and when, to the important details like the exact words in patient information leaflets and how people are welcomed when they arrive. And there's a process to the process - or at least there was till Covid hit, and raised some big questions about how we involved patients in research during a pandemic. And the person to answer those questions in Nottingham was our latest Research Hero, Kate Frost, who's Head of Patient and Public Involvement at Nottingham's NIHR Biomedical Research Centre and Clinical Research Facility. This episode was published for International Clinical Trials Day ##internationalclinicaltrialsday. Links Nottingham's NIHR Biomedical Research Centre and Clinical Research Facility - https://www.nottinghambrc.nihr.ac.uk/take-part or email getinvolved@nuh.nhs.uk Nottingham NIHR Clinical Research Facility - https://nottinghamcrf.nihr.ac.uk/ Our Research Hub: https://www.nottinghamresearch.org/ Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust research information for patients and public - https://www.nuh.nhs.uk/patients-and-public-ri This Podcast is brought to you by the Research & Innovation team at Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust. Follow us on @ResearchNUH and @NottmBRC, or email R&Icomms@nuh.nhs.uk. If you haven't already, please subscribe to the podcast where-ever you get your podcasts, and like/review us on Apple Podcasts especially. It's For Science.
07:58
May 21, 2021
The CHEAR study
We all know about Long Covid symptoms like breathlessness and prolonged fatigue, but there are also signs that it can effect the hearing, tinnitus, and balance. The CHEAR (COVID and Hearing, otherwise known as ‘Measuring Hearing, Tinnitus and Balance following COVID-19’) Study will involve around 100 patients living in the East Midlands region. National Institute for Health Research Nottingham Biomedical Research Centre principal investigator Prof David Baguley, study co-ordinator Charlotte Caimino and research audiologist Paul Bateman talk about the study.  More information: CHEAR Study - https://nottinghambrc.nihr.ac.uk/about-nottingham-brc/news/1522-nottingham-hearing-experts-probe-possible-impact-of-covid-19-on-patients-hearing Follow Prof David Baguley @drdavidbaguley Follow @hearingNIHR on Twitter This Podcast is brought to you by the Research & Innovation team at Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust. Follow us on @ResearchNUH and @NottmBRC, or email R&Icomms@nuh.nhs.uk. If you haven't already, please subscribe to The Clinical Research Podcast wherever you get your podcasts, and if you like what you hear, please leave us a review. It's For Science.
18:60
May 18, 2021
Research Heroes - Jesse Oliver
Jesse is is a clinical research practitioner at the NIHR Nottingham Clinical Research Facility. He was initially drawn to lab work because he liked being able to get to a neat clean answer - but then Covid-19 hit and life stopped being neat and mathematical, and he's discovered that meeting patients, and training colleagues can be just as satisfying. Our COVID-19 Research Heroes were designed to recognise the contribution of individuals and teams working in NUH, the NIHR Nottingham Biomedical Research Centre and the NIHR Clinical Research Centre in battling the virus. We'll be posting more interviews with them over the next few weeks. Links: More on our Research Heroes - https://www.nuh.nhs.uk/news-research/covid19-heroes-awards-5276 Follow us on Twitter - @ResearchNUH
09:24
May 12, 2021
Dr Sarah Brand on her Learning Lunches
Research is everywhere in Nottingham University Hospitals - not just on the wards but down corridors in that block on that floor we just have no reason to know anything about. And nobody has the time to go wandering round randomly on the offchance they'll find something they didn't know they were looking for. So how do you find out what you don't know that you didn't know? One way is the learning at lunchtime series, set up by senior research nurse Dr Sarah Brand. She explained what it's all about.
09:36
May 06, 2021
Poet Ian McMillan talks about how he thanked the people of Nottingham for Covid-19 research
The researchers at Nottingham University Hospitals couldn't do what they do without the thousands of other people who sometimes don't get the credit they're due. Most drug treatments start off in the laboratory but before they're allowed to be used by the NHS, they're trialled in the wild - that is on real patients in real life. And like everything over the last year with Covid 19 that's happened at a faster, bigger scale than ever before. In Nottingham alone, more than ten thousand people have signed up to be part of our work on trials including the Oxford Astra Zeneca vaccine and dexamethasone, amongst others. We wanted to say thank you to those people for their help so we commissioned Yorkshire poet Ian McMillan to write a thank you on our behalf. I talked to him about how he wrote the poem, why he likes the shape of numbers even though they make him nervous, and how words and numbers should get together for a picnic - a socially distanced one of course.
14:08
April 12, 2021
What's it like to work on the UK's biggest Covid-19 research trial?
Scientists based in Nottingham research teams at Nottingham University Hospitals have recruited more than 600 patients into RECOVERY, the world's biggest clinical trial in hospitalised patients with COVID-19. As a result, they've contributed to the UK his efforts to find effective life saving treatments. However, the recovery trial has thrown up a number of questions from our clinical staff who were dealing with the unprecedented pandemic on the wards of Nottingham's NHS hospitals. For our latest research podcast Andrew Bennett spoke to senior clinical research nurses Lindsay Crate, Rebecca Bolton and Jack Squires, all from our specialist COVID-19 research team. They talk about the latest drug arms being used in the RECOVERY trial, how would staff can support the vital research and new age, and what research and innovation can do to help clinicians.
21:08
April 12, 2021
Long Covid and the NoRCoRP platform
There's no obvious correlation between how seriously Covid affects a patient initially, and its longer term effects. One of our research programmes is trying to uncover why some people recover fully and quickly, and why others may be affected far longer.  Called NoRCoRP - for Nottingham Recovery from Covid Research Platform - it was set up by Professor Ian Hall, the director of Nottingham Biomedical Research Centre, and includes a range of  studies into the long term effects of the illness. You're going to hear from him and his colleague Professor Charlotte Bolton. Like most of our researchers, they treat patients in hospital clinics, and they realised as long   as last summer that some patients who'd had Covid but didn't need hospital treatment initially, seemed to get worse, not better.
09:15
March 09, 2021