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The Why Africa Podcast

The Why Africa Podcast

By Why Africa
The African continent and its people have long been a subject of study at universities across the United Kingdom. What are the origins of this endeavour? How has it been undertaken, by whom, and with what effects on those receiving this (mis)education? In the Why Africa Podcast the hosts speak to students and academics about the challenges of decolonizing African studies in the UK and the work they are engaged in to rethink how the continent is taught and researched today.
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Ep. 1 Cynthia Kamwengo and Ben Radley: On why we need to restructure teaching and research on African countries

The Why Africa Podcast

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Ep. 1 Cynthia Kamwengo and Ben Radley: On why we need to restructure teaching and research on African countries
In episode one, Dr Cynthia Kamwengo and Dr Ben Radley provide an overview of the podcast goals and episodes. Cynthia is a Postdoctoral Research Fellow in International Development and Ben is a Lecturer in International Development at the University of Bath.  Find us on Twitter: @RadleyBen @CynthKamwengo   Produced by: Holly Jewell
36:16
July 27, 2022
Ep. 2 Abi Glyn: On the experience of learning about African countries in a UK primary school, secondary school, and university
In this episode, Abi Glyn discusses her submission to the All-Party Parliamentary Group (APPG) for Africa and Royal African Society’s inquiry into how Africa and its diaspora are taught in British schools. Abi talks to us about her own education and the value of modernising the national curriculum. Abi is a BSc International Relations student at the University of Gloucestershire. She attended primary and secondary school in the Cotswolds.  LinkedIn: Abigail Glyn  APPG Report: 2022 Africa Education Inquiry
27:59
July 27, 2022
Ep. 3 George Gumisiriza: On the experience of being an African studying in UK higher education
In episode three, George Gumisiriza reflects on his experience of being an African learning and researching about African countries in British universities. George also reflects on the challenges of decolonizing knowledge production in Uganda. George is a PhD Candidate at the Centre for Death Studies in the Department of Social & Policy Sciences, University of Bath. His doctoral research examines Afrocentric perspectives on death and repatriation in the diaspora. George holds an MRes in International Development (University of Bath, UK), a MSc in Social and Cultural Theory (University of Bristol, UK) and a Bachelor of Education (Makerere University, Uganda). George was a finalist nominee in the 2022 Doctoral Recognition Awards for public engagement at the University of Bath.  Twitter: @GeorgeGumisiri4  Blog: An African Way to Die Blog: How private is (my) grief?
51:50
July 27, 2022
Ep. 4 Eyob Balcha Gebremariam: On the experience of teaching African Development through a decolonial lens
In episode four, Dr Eyob Balcha Gebremariam describes his experience teaching African Development through a decolonial lens at the London School of Economics & Political Science and the challenges of decolonizing education in Ethiopia. Eyob is a Research Associate at the Perivoli Africa Research Centre, University of Bristol. Eyob is an experienced educator, researcher and policy analyst on the topics of decolonial development, African political economy, African regional integration, African youth, urban politics, refugee and forced migration studies. Twitter: @BalchaEyob  Blog: Reflections from teaching African Development using decolonial perspectives at LSE  Blog: The Primacy of Epistemic Justice
29:59
July 27, 2022
Ep 5. Gauthier Marchais: On racism, whiteness and the challenges of decolonizing academic research in African countries
In this episode, Dr Gauthier Marchais reflects on the issues of racism, whiteness, and the challenges of decolonizing academic research in the Democratic Republic of Congo. Gauthier is a Research Fellow at the Institute of Development Studies, University of Sussex. He holds a PhD from the London School of Economics & Political Science and has a background in political science and development studies. His research concentrates on how societies transform in war, with a multi-disciplinary perspective. He has written a book, Le déni blanc (White Denial), which builds on his personal experience and research work on the mental architecture of race from the perspective of a white man. Twitter: @GotMarchais Journal article: ‘The data is gold, and we are the gold-diggers’: whiteness, race and contemporary academic research in eastern DRC Blog: How can we address global knowledge inequalities in international research partnerships? Book: Le déni blanc: Penser autrement la question raciale For more see: Marakuja Kivu Research
34:22
July 27, 2022