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Students and Scholars

Students and Scholars

By Zan Cammack

A pre-lecture podcast for the course English 2620-British Literature after 1800 at Utah Valley University, Spring 2021.
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E04 - #Bigger6 Romanticism with Alanna Camargo

Students and Scholars

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Ep15 - Discrimination, Mental Health, and Grief in Jacqueline Roy's The Fat Lady Sings with Dr. Zan Cammack
Ep15 - Discrimination, Mental Health, and Grief in Jacqueline Roy's The Fat Lady Sings with Dr. Zan Cammack
This episode discusses Jacqueline Roy's 2000 debut novel The Fat Lady Sings and themes such as race, gender and sexuality, and mental health. It turns out this is an incredibly apt novel to wrap up an exceptionally heavy semester on a note of hope and joy. CW: sexual assault, loss of a loved one
21:42
April 19, 2021
Ep14 - Theatre of the Absurd with Kath, Addison, and Brooke
Ep14 - Theatre of the Absurd with Kath, Addison, and Brooke
In this student-led episode, Kath, Addison, and Brooke discuss the Theatre of the Absurd in relation to Samuel Beckett’s play Krapp’s Last Tape and Enda Walsh’s play Penelope.  Bibliography  Beckett, Samuel. Krapp's Last Tape. Faber and Faber Ltd, 2014. Billington, Michael. “Penelope | Theatre Review.” The Guardian, Guardian News and Media, 26 July 2010, www.theguardian.com/stage/2010/jul/26/penelope-druid-lane-galway-review. Dickson, Andrew. “Nonsense Talk: Theatre of the Absurd.” The British Library, The British Library, 3 Aug. 2017, www.bl.uk/20th-century-literature/articles/nonsense-talk-theatre-of-the-absurd. Hurt, John. “Krapp's Last Tape: John Hurt on Samuel Beckett's Loner Hero.” The Guardian, Guardian News and Media, 23 July 2014, www.theguardian.com/stage/2014/jul/23/john-hurt-samuel-beckett-krapps-last-tape. Lavey, Martha. “Welcome to Penelope.” Steppenwolf Theatre, www.steppenwolf.org/articles/welcome-to-penelope/. Steppenwolftheatre, director. Enda Walsh on Penelope. YouTube, YouTube, 19 Jan. 2012, www.youtube.com/watch?v=KOX9VM7o_KI. Walsh, Enda. Penelope. Nick Hern Books, 2010. Williams, Tom. “Penelope.” Theatre Reviews, 19 Dec. 2011, chicagocritic.com/penelope/.
27:12
April 12, 2021
Ep13 - Film and Propaganda in Isherwood's Prater Violet with Jamey, Alexis, and Emma
Ep13 - Film and Propaganda in Isherwood's Prater Violet with Jamey, Alexis, and Emma
In this student-led episode, Jamey, Alexis, and Emma discuss Christopher Isherwood’s novel Prater Violet in connection with film and propaganda. Bibliography Prater Violet by Christopher Isherwood  “Breakfast at the Prater: Christopher Isherwood, His Women and Men” by Ercolino, Stefano, et al. Imaginary Films in Literature. Brill | Rodopi, 2016. Propaganda and the Citizen in British Feature Films of World War II “The Power of Cinema’: Film in the 1920s and 30s” from University of Warwick  Britain's World War II films were more than just propaganda Queer Camera: Christopher Isherwood's Goodbye to Berlin and Prater Violet by U Patra. 
21:29
April 05, 2021
Ep12 - Stream of Consciousness and Mrs. Dalloway with Darian, Robby, Alicia, Jessica, and Ashley
Ep12 - Stream of Consciousness and Mrs. Dalloway with Darian, Robby, Alicia, Jessica, and Ashley
In this student-led episode, Darian, Robby, Alicia, Jessica, and Ashley walk us through the concepts of stream of consciousness and how this narrative style became a trademark of modernist works such as Virginia Woolf’s novel Mrs. Dalloway.
24:30
March 29, 2021
Ep11 - World War One Poetry with Jonathan Patterson
Ep11 - World War One Poetry with Jonathan Patterson
In this episode our guest scholar, Jonathon Patterson, explores poetry from World War One. He explains why poetry was one of the primary media outlets for soldiers and citizens during this era and how it was politicized. He also discusses broadening representations in our definition of  WWI poets and why these works remain relevant over 100 years later. Jonathan Patterson is a doctoral candidate at Kansas University and plans to defend his dissertation on spatiality in the experiences of World War One combat poets later this semester. He has published work on this theme in several peer-reviewed journals including Alicante Journal of English Studies and The Journal of Humanities and Cultural Studies.
30:16
March 21, 2021
Ep10 - Victorian Genre Fiction and Material Culture in Dracula with Dr. Ashley Nadeau
Ep10 - Victorian Genre Fiction and Material Culture in Dracula with Dr. Ashley Nadeau
This episode we welcome guest scholar Dr. Ashley Nadeau as she examines Dracula as a novel that draws from popular Victorian genre fiction, and detective fiction in particular. She also uses examples of material culture within the novel—railways, blood, nightdresses, and typewriters—as objects that help us better understand Dracula’s narrative. Dr. Nadeau received her doctorate from University of Massachusetts Amherst where she studied Victorian fiction in relation to architecture and form. She has been faculty here at UVU for the past three years. She has recently begun a new study exploring the impact of audiobooks on 19th century studies, making her insights into new media particularly exciting.
31:24
March 15, 2021
Ep08 - Victorian New Media and Dracula with Braydon, JoAnne, and Kialey
Ep08 - Victorian New Media and Dracula with Braydon, JoAnne, and Kialey
In this student-led episode, Braydon, JoAnne, and Kialey discuss six different forms of Victorian new media as they appear in Bram Stoker's Dracula, posing questions about new media's reliability in constructing larger narratives. Bibliography Fava-Verde, Jean-François. “Victorian Telegrams: The Early Development of the Telegraphic Despatch and Its Interplay with the Letter Post.” Notes and Records: the Royal Society Journal of the History of Science, vol. 72, no. 3, 2018, pp. 275–292., doi:10.1098/rsnr.2017.0031.  Bellis, Mary. “The History of Typewriters, Typing, and Qwerty Keyboards.” ThoughtCo, 2019, www.thoughtco.com/typewriters-1992539#:~:text=Christopher%20Sholes&text=He%20invented%20the%20first%20practical,model%20similar%20to%20today's%20typewriters.  History.com Editors. “Morse Code & the Telegraph.” History.com, A&E Television Networks, 9 Nov. 2009, www.history.com/topics/inventions/telegraph.
24:46
March 01, 2021
Ep07 - Marriage and the New Woman with Dr. Ellen Campbell
Ep07 - Marriage and the New Woman with Dr. Ellen Campbell
Today we are joined by guest scholar Dr. Ellen Campbell who discusses women’s rights under marriage contract law in the 19th century and the New Woman figure in Dracula. Dr. Campbell received her doctorate from Southern Illinois University Carbondale where her dissertation discussed marriage trauma narratives in transatlantic 19th-century fiction. She is currently a lecturer at Auburn University and has a forthcoming chapter in the edited collection #MeToo Modernism from Clemson University Press. Content Warning: this episode discusses themes related to domestic abuse and sexual assault. If these are triggers for you, please forego this episode join us for next week’s episode on Victorian New Media. Also, I’m offering you a giant virtual hug.
31:18
February 21, 2021
Ep06 - Victorian Print Culture and Serialized Fiction with Emily, Sage, Melanie, and Aubree
Ep06 - Victorian Print Culture and Serialized Fiction with Emily, Sage, Melanie, and Aubree
In this student-led episode Aubree, Sage, Melanie, and Emily lead us through a conversation about Victorian print culture and serialized fiction especially in relation to Wilkie Collins' novel The Moonstone.
21:39
February 13, 2021
Ep05 - Darwinism in the 19th Century with Dr. Trent Olsen
Ep05 - Darwinism in the 19th Century with Dr. Trent Olsen
In this episode, we welcome Dr. Trent Olsen as our guest scholar. He will be discussing the impact Charles Darwin’s discoveries and published work in The Origin of Species had on the wider 19th century. He discusses points of literary connection between Darwin, William Wordsworth, Robert Louis Stevenson, Emily Pfeiffer, H.G. Wells, and Thomas Hardy as a spectrum of the shifting world views on humankind’s role in nature. Dr. Olsen earned his doctorate at the University of Minnesota and is currently an associate professor at Brigham Young University-Idaho. In 2018 he published his book Wordsworth and Evolution in Victorian Literature: Entangled Influence with Routledge and  a forthcoming book, The Complete Personal Essays of Robert Louis Stevenson (also with Routledge) due for publication in May 2021.  Bibliography Charles Darwin's On the Origin of Species Emily Pfeiffer's "To Nature" H.G. Wells The Island of Doctor Moreau Robert Louis Stevenson's "Pulvis et Umbra" Thomas Hardy's "Hap" Trenton B. Olsen's Wordsworth and Evolution in Victorian Literature: Entangled Influence William Wordsworth "The Tables Turned"
30:54
February 05, 2021
E04 - #Bigger6 Romanticism with Alanna Camargo
E04 - #Bigger6 Romanticism with Alanna Camargo
This episode, I’m excited to present our first student-led episode which discusses the movement for #Bigger6 Romanticism. Alanna Camargo leads our conversation about the purpose behind the movement and collective as well as how broadening our perspectives of race and empire can introduce us to a much more vibrant and textured understanding of the Romantic era and help us continue our work on being anti-racist. Bibliography “An Introduction to British Romanticism.” Poetry Foundation @Bigger6Romantix. ““Bigger 6 isn’t about either saving or scrapping a field so much as it is about committing to training ourselves in arts of epistemological and political transformation through dedicated knowledge practices””. Twitter, 17 Nov. 2020, 9:33 a.m.,  Bakary Diaby's “Black Women and/in the Shadow of Romanticism.” European Romantic Review, vol. 30, no. 3, 2019, pp. 249, 254. Stephen M. Hart and Jordan Hart's “Latin America’s “Chiaroscuro” Byron.” Romantic Circles. Olivia Loksing Moy and Marco Ramírez Rojas's “Latin American Afterlives of the British Romantics.” Romantic Circles  Eugenia Zuroski's “This Ship We’re In.” The Rambling. Patricia Matthews "Shondaland's Regency: On 'Bridgerton'" Los Angeles Review of Books, 26 Dec. 2020. Collected Poems of Henry Derozio, Preface by Manu Samriti Chander, Edited by Amardeep Singh. "Intertexts: English Romanticism"
28:47
January 31, 2021
Ep03 - Literary and Musical Romanticism with Dr. Karali Hunter
Ep03 - Literary and Musical Romanticism with Dr. Karali Hunter
In this episode we are joined by guest scholar, Dr. Karali Hunter, as we discuss the cross-sections between literary and musical Romanticism, particularly in the context of romantic themes, such as breaking away from rigid form and structure, evoking emotion, and embracing the individual and national voices of the period. Dr. Hunter has a DMA in piano performance from Arizona State University. She is an award-winning performer and pedagogue as well as owner and founder of Hammer & Strings Conservatory. She has performed at Carnegie Hall and continues as an active performer, as a founding artist of the chamber group, Salonnières. Today she will be discussing her experience of arranging and performing the work “'Tis the Last Rose of Summer” as part of this chamber Group. Bibliography Chopin's "Revolutionary Etude," Opus 10, no. 12 performed by Rousseau Karali Hunter's arrangement of Thomas Moore's " 'Tis the Last Rose of Summer" performed by Salonnières Salonnières album on iTunes and Amazon Music Thomas Moore's poem, " 'Tis the Last Rose of Summer"
30:01
January 22, 2021
Ep02 - Sedition, Riots, and Rumor Networks in Northanger Abbey with Dr. Zan Cammack
Ep02 - Sedition, Riots, and Rumor Networks in Northanger Abbey with Dr. Zan Cammack
Today’s episode seems nearly ripped from the headlines as Dr. Zan Cammack discusses sedition, riots, and rumor as part of the larger new media networks at play in Jane Austen’s novel Northanger Abbey. We’ll examine the pervasive theme of surveillance and political upheaval in the novel, the innovations in mapping that more concretely trace the networks of information in England, and you might be get some Bridgerton vibes as we discuss Bath as its own kind of surveillance state with scandal sheets and gossip mills. Access to transcript available here. Bibliography Cammack, Susanne S. “Fanny Price’s Social Cartography in Mansfield Park.” Nineteenth Century Studies, vol. 29, Nineteenth-Century Studies Association, 2016, pp. 37–52.  Hewitt, Rachel. Map of a Nation: A Biography of the Ordnance Survey. Granta, 2011. Robert Hopkins. “General Tilney and Affairs of State: The Political Gothic of ‘Northanger Abbey.’” Philological Quarterly, vol. 57, no. 2, 1978, pp. 213–24. The Eighteenth-Century Novel and Contemporary Social Issues : An Introduction. Accessed 13 Jan. 2021.
26:53
January 15, 2021
Ep01 - The Novel as New Media with Dr. Emily Grover
Ep01 - The Novel as New Media with Dr. Emily Grover
In our first episode our guest scholar Dr. Emily Grover discusses precursors to Austen’s novels, the fraught history of female authors and readers, and the dangers of falling too deep into fiction. Bibliography Anne Radcliffe. The Mysteries of Udolpho, Project Gutenberg. Charles Lamb, and Mary Lamb. The Works Of Charles and Mary Lamb, Miscellaneous Prose, Project Gutenberg. Charlotte Lennox. The Female Quixote,  Project Gutenberg. Marta Kvande and Emily Gilliland Grover. “The Mediation Is the Message: Charles Johnstone’s Chrysal (1760).” Eighteenth-Century Fiction, vol. 32, no. 4, June 2020, pp. 535–57. doi:10.3138/ecf.32.4.535.
29:37
January 12, 2021
Ep00 - Welcome to Students and Scholars
Ep00 - Welcome to Students and Scholars
Welcome to the Students and Scholars podcast for English 2620-British Literature before 1800.
02:10
January 09, 2021