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 The Librarian's Guide to Teaching

The Librarian's Guide to Teaching

By Amanda Piekart
This podcast is hosted by two instruction librarians that are interested in sharing their experiences teaching information literacy, discussing current trends, and having meaningful conversations about librarianship.
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Project Info Lit "Covid-19: The first 100 days of U.S. news coverage” Report & Interview with Alison Head- Part II
Topics & Takeaways (Part 2) With the COVID story, we're getting to see how science works under pressure and without information agency or discipline expertise, it can be hard to understand what's happening and see the downsides to peer review. In a way, we can identify the questions to ask about where media literacy should go next but not really the exact solutions. We need to recognize the social-ness of news and of research and it must be taken into consideration in the transformation of media literacy. If not everything is biased, how do we unpack that with students? Students relate to images and we can use examples from the report to discuss with them how the images impact the way they interpret news. While some faculty are single-source news viewers ("I only look at NPR"), students just don't engage in the media landscape that way. Reach out to Alison at alison@projectinfolit.org with how you are using the report in the classroom & how students are responding! Resources referenced in this episode: PIL's list of Covid-19 misinformation resources Project Info Lit’s Publications Librarian’s Guide to Teaching: Episode 9 with Barbara Fister on the Algo Report SIFT (The Four Moves) - Mike Caulfield Sam Wineburg, Stanford Researcher on Twitter Calling Bullshit: The Art of Skepticism in a Data-Driven World by Carl T. Bergstrom, Jevin West You Think You Want Media Literacy… Do You? By Danah Boyd Casting a critical eye on "fake news" literacy and post truth pedagogy - CLAPS 2020 (Source of the quote, “You can’t SIFT yourself out of QANON”) How the COVID-19 crisis has prompted a revolution in scientific publishing - Fast Company - 8/5/2020 This episode's theme music: Srivastav, A. (2013). Merry Go Round [Audio file]. Retrieved from https://soundcloud.com/909-music/arnav-srivastav-merry-go Here's where you can find us: Podcast: @Librarian_Guide Jessica: @LibraryGeek611 Amanda: @HistoryBuff820 Email: InfoLitTeachingPodcast@gmail.com Be sure to rate and subscribe wherever you listen to the podcast!
36:55
November 10, 2020
Project Info Lit "Covid-19: The first 100 days of U.S. news coverage” Report & Interview with Alison Head
Show Notes: In this episode, Amanda and Jessica chat with researcher, Alison Head, to discuss the new Project Information Literacy Report called “Covid-19: The first 100 days of U.S. news coverage”. Topics & Takeaways: Topics & Takeaways (Part 1) How can the PIL COVID report help librarians and educators discuss news, media and visual literacy with students? How can students learn to reclaim their information agency? How can students exert control over the on-slught of news coming at them? Reach out to Alison at alison@projectinfolit.org with how you are using the report in the classroom & how students are responding! We need to pull up 30,000 feet to look at the landscape of news with students and how sources develop rather than just evaluating individual sources. While the CRAAP test is a great framework for evaluation, Facebook and social media have changed the arc of information and the strategies that we use for sources. Social media amplifies our attention around certain media and visuals. Since COVID is a news topic that has touched everyone around the world in all disciplines, it can be a topic that can engage students across disciplines/topics. Resources referenced in this episode: PIL's list of Covid-19 misinformation resources Project Info Lit’s Publications Librarian’s Guide to Teaching: Episode 9 with Barbara Fister on the Algo Report SIFT (The Four Moves) - Mike Caulfield Sam Wineburg, Stanford Researcher on Twitter Calling Bullshit: The Art of Skepticism in a Data-Driven World by Carl T. Bergstrom, Jevin West You Think You Want Media Literacy… Do You? By Danah Boyd Casting a critical eye on "fake news" literacy and post truth pedagogy - CLAPS 2020 (Source of the quote, “You can’t SIFT yourself out of QANON”) How the COVID-19 crisis has prompted a revolution in scientific publishing - Fast Company - 8/5/2020 This episode's theme music: Srivastav, A. (2013). Merry Go Round [Audio file]. Retrieved from https://soundcloud.com/909-music/arnav-srivastav-merry-go Here's where you can find us: Podcast: @Librarian_Guide Jessica: @LibraryGeek611 Amanda: @HistoryBuff820 Email: InfoLitTeachingPodcast@gmail.com Be sure to rate and subscribe wherever you listen to the podcast!
35:53
November 3, 2020
Academic Ableism, Librarianship & #CripLib
.Show Notes: In this episode, Amanda and Jessica chat with Katie Quirin Manwiller about Academic Ableism and Criplib. Resources referenced in this episode: http://teaforteaching.com/149-academic-ableism/ Katie’s ACRL 2019 ACRLog blog post UDL Framework CripLib website for future chats Library Juice Academy Course on UDL This episode's theme music: Srivastav, A. (2013). Merry Go Round [Audio file]. Retrieved from https://soundcloud.com/909-music/arnav-srivastav-merry-go Here's where you can find us: Podcast: @Librarian_Guide Jessica: @LibraryGeek611 Amanda: @HistoryBuff820 Email: InfoLitTeachingPodcast@gmail.com Be sure to rate and subscribe wherever you listen to the podcast!
47:15
October 20, 2020
Mentoring: A view from both sides of the relationship
In this episode, Amanda and Jessica chat about their experiences with mentoring - from both sides as mentors and mentees - as well as share some resources. Resources referenced in this episode: Critical Librarianship & Pedagogy Symposium How to Ask Someone to be Your Mentor – Dos and Donts Getting into the Club: Existence and Availability of Mentoring for Tenured Librarians in Academic Libraries by Juliann Couture, Jennie Gerke, and Jennifer Knievel in C&RL News LibVoices Podcast: Episode 7 Dr. Raymond Pun on Engagement and Community Building ALA Mentoring Resources @BlackLibrarian Instagram This episode's theme music: Srivastav, A. (2013). Merry Go Round [Audio file]. Retrieved from https://soundcloud.com/909-music/arnav-srivastav-merry-go Here's where you can find us: Podcast: @Librarian_Guide Jessica: @LibraryGeek611 Amanda: @HistoryBuff820 Email: InfoLitTeachingPodcast@gmail.com Be sure to rate and subscribe wherever you listen to the podcast!
33:53
October 6, 2020
Mini Episode 4: How are you preparing for Virtual Conference Season?
Show Notes: In our fourth mini episode, Amanda and Jessica take a look back at episode 6 which was making time for professional development and discuss an interesting article about virtual conferences that are our new reality. Resources referenced in this episode: [Virtual] Conference Season Is Here: Are you prepared? By Jasmine Wallace Evernote This episode's theme music: Srivastav, A. (2013). Merry Go Round [Audio file]. Retrieved from https://soundcloud.com/909-music/arnav-srivastav-merry-go  Here's where you can find us: Podcast: @Librarian_Guide Jessica: @LibraryGeek611 Amanda: @HistoryBuff820 Email: InfoLitTeachingPodcast@gmail.com Be sure to rate and subscribe wherever you listen to the podcast!
18:42
September 24, 2020
Formative Assessment: An Interview with Mary-Michelle Moore
In this episode, Amanda and Jessica chat with Mary-Michelle Moore, a Teaching & Learning Librarian at UC Santa Barbara about formative assessment and a plan that she designed for student assessment in class. Topics & Takeaways: When librarians enter the classroom for a one-shot session, even with faculty feedback prior to class, it can be difficult to know the extent of prior knowledge students have. By asking students for feedback before and during a session about information literacy, we bring student experiences into the learning and also get real time information on how to move the learning forward. Implementing formative assessment in the classroom can allow librarians to collect information during a session to see what students need for learning and it can vary from basic questioning to bouncing between different topics/activities. Forms of formative assessment discussed: Think, Pair, Share Padlet Wooclap Audience Response When asking students for information, balance how much information is given to them (overload) while also providing enough detail to explain the “why” behind the activity/assessment and the “what” that is expected. Resources referenced in this episode: “Using Formative Assessment Techniques to Customize a Standard Lesson Plan to an Individual Section” - Mary-Michelle Moore’s presentation at the California Information Literacy Conference Wooclap Audience Response Padlet Facilitating student learning and engagement with formative assessment by Jennifer Jarson - ACRLog.org Types of summative assessment and formative assessment - by ResourcEd Blog This episode's theme music: Srivastav, A. (2013). Merry Go Round [Audio file]. Retrieved from https://soundcloud.com/909-music/arnav-srivastav-merry-go Here's where you can find us: Podcast: @Librarian_Guide Jessica: @LibraryGeek611 Amanda: @HistoryBuff820 Email: InfoLitTeachingPodcast@gmail.com Be sure to rate and subscribe wherever you listen to the podcast!
30:21
September 16, 2020
Mini Episode #3: What to do When Tech Fails
Show Notes: In this episode, Amanda and Jessica take a closer look at a topic covered in episode 5 - classroom management. They discuss technology in the classroom and share some ideas/tips of how to recover when tech fails in the class. Biggest takeaway - Preparation is everything! Resources referenced in this episode: What to Do When the Technology Fails in Class By Colette Bennett on ThoughtCo, Updated February 12, 2020 Classroom Technology Fails: How to Prepare for Disasters by Shannon Treichel on Medium, March 29, 2019 Padlet This episode's theme music: Srivastav, A. (2013). Merry Go Round [Audio file]. Retrieved from https://soundcloud.com/909-music/arnav-srivastav-merry-go  Here's where you can find us: Podcast: @Librarian_Guide Jessica: @LibraryGeek611 Amanda: @HistoryBuff820 Email: InfoLitTeachingPodcast@gmail.com Be sure to rate and subscribe wherever you listen to the podcast!
12:31
September 9, 2020
2020 ACRL Trends: Takeaways, Concerns and Recommendations
In this episode, Amanda and Jessica are discussing a recent article in College & Research Library News regarding the top trends this year in academic libraries. And how has the pandemic impacted these trends? Resources referenced in this episode: 2020 top trends in academic libraries: A review of the trends and issues affecting academic libraries in higher education by Members of the ACRL Research Planning and Review Committee, published in C&RL News, June 2020 A Comprehensive Primer to Library Learning Analytics Practices, Initiatives, and Privacy Issues by Kyle M.L. Jones, Kristin A. Briney, Abigail Goben, Dorothea Salo, Andrew Asher, and Michael R. Perry, published in C&RL News Building a Critical Culture: How Critical Librarianship Falls Short in the Workplace by Jennifer A. Ferretti, published in Communications in Information Literacy Data Doubles Project This episode's theme music: Srivastav, A. (2013). Merry Go Round [Audio file]. Retrieved from https://soundcloud.com/909-music/arnav-srivastav-merry-go  Here's where you can find us: Podcast: @Librarian_Guide Jessica: @LibraryGeek611 Amanda: @HistoryBuff820 Email: InfoLitTeachingPodcast@gmail.com Be sure to rate and subscribe wherever you listen to the podcast!
28:05
September 1, 2020
Mini Episode #2: Libraries in the Pandemic
Show Notes: In our second mini episode, Amanda and Jessica are reflecting back on the third episode of LGT which discussed the academic library as perceived by a non-librarian in the article, “College Students Just Want Normal Libraries” in The Atlantic published in 2019. This episode discusses a recent Inside Higher Ed article called “Changed, Changed Utterly”. Resources referenced in this episode: College Students Just Want Normal Libraries by Alia Wong in The Atlantic Episode 3: Can libraries be normal? Changed, Changed Utterly by Christopher Cox in Inside Higher Ed This episode's theme music: Srivastav, A. (2013). Merry Go Round [Audio file]. Retrieved from https://soundcloud.com/909-music/arnav-srivastav-merry-go  Here's where you can find us: Podcast: @Librarian_Guide Jessica: @LibraryGeek611 Amanda: @HistoryBuff820 Email: InfoLitTeachingPodcast@gmail.com Be sure to rate and subscribe wherever you listen to the podcast!
12:06
August 26, 2020
All about LibGuides: Experiences, Use, and Pie in the Sky Ideas
In this episode, Amanda and Jessica are chatting about all things LibGuides. How have we used them? What would we love them to do? And much more! Resources referenced in this episode: Hidden Patterns of LibGuides Usage: Another Facet of Usability by Gabriela Castro-Gessner, Wendy Wilcox, and Adam Chandler Guidelines for Accessible LibGuides by University of Waterloo Pace University Free & Fun Online Resources: Stress Relief for Finals Pace University Book Madness Berkeley College LibNews Newsletter No Pedagogical Advantage Found Between LibGuides and Other Web Page Information Literacy Tutorials by Kimberly Miller in Evidence Based Library and Information Practice. 2015;10(1) DOI 10.18438/B8WC8N Tweet: @Lindsonmars, 1/28/2019 - Breaking news: It’s confirmed. The origin of the name “LibGuides” came from “Liberty” not “Library.” And that is as previously reported, fully bananas. Also you know how to pronounce it now! This is Lindsay Cronk reporting from #ALAMW19. Back to studio. Tweet: @Kaetrena, 6/3/2020 - Please add your #Antiracism #libguides to this list: This episode's theme music: Srivastav, A. (2013). Merry Go Round [Audio file]. Retrieved from https://soundcloud.com/909-music/arnav-srivastav-merry-go  Here's where you can find us: Podcast: @Librarian_Guide Jessica: @LibraryGeek611 Amanda: @HistoryBuff820 Email: InfoLitTeachingPodcast@gmail.com Be sure to rate and subscribe wherever you listen to the podcast!
44:21
August 19, 2020
Mini Episode 1: Imposter Syndrome Update
Show Notes: In this first mini episode, Amanda and Jessica are going to reflect back on the first LGT episode about imposter syndrome by discussing a recent article about the topic. Resources referenced in this episode: It’s Not Imposter Syndrome: Resisting Self-doubt As Normal For Library Workers by Nicole Andrews, In The Library With the Lead Pipe Episode #1: Imposters in the Classroom? This episode's theme music: Srivastav, A. (2013). Merry Go Round [Audio file]. Retrieved from https://soundcloud.com/909-music/arnav-srivastav-merry-go  Here's where you can find us: Podcast: @Librarian_Guide Jessica: @LibraryGeek611 Amanda: @HistoryBuff820 Email: InfoLitTeachingPodcast@gmail.com Be sure to rate and subscribe wherever you listen to the podcast!
10:55
August 12, 2020
Chatting Podcasts & Stories with the co-hosts of LibVoices!
Show Notes: In this episode, Amanda and Jessica are chatting podcasts with the co-creators of the LibVoices podcast, Amanda Leftwich, Jamia Williams and Jamillah Gabriel! NOTE: It’s not your speakers! We had some technical difficulties recording this episode and we are sorry some of the sound is a bit choppy. Resources referenced in this episode: LibVoices Podcast on Twitter LibVoices Podcast on Anchor Fix My Library #Secure the Seat Pass the Mic Therapy for Black Girls Black Girls Read School Librarians United Yogi Bryan Next Big Idea News Literacy Project Webinars Find our guests: Amanda Leftwich - Twitter: @thelibmaven and @libvoic Jamia Williams - Twitter: @librarianjamia & Web: https://diversityfellow.blog Jamillah Gabrial - Twitter @jamillahgabriel This episode's theme music: Srivastav, A. (2013). Merry Go Round [Audio file]. Retrieved from https://soundcloud.com/909-music/arnav-srivastav-merry-go  Here's where you can find us: Podcast: @Librarian_Guide Jessica: @LibraryGeek611 Amanda: @HistoryBuff820 Email: InfoLitTeachingPodcast@gmail.com Be sure to rate and subscribe wherever you listen to the podcast!
31:13
August 4, 2020
Humor in Information Literacy Instruction
Show Notes: In this episode, Amanda and Jessica chat with librarians Lee Adams, Stephanie Alexander, and Lana Woods about their work using satirical videos in IL instruction and using humor in the classroom. Topics & Takeaways: Starting with a tool like satirical videos allows the librarian to lean on comedians who are paid to be funny and not have to write their own materials.  There is a tension of needing to stay “professional” and be funny which can especially be a risk depending on the librarian’s race/gender/class etc. Women are not seen as funny and research has been shown it can be a risk for BIPOC (see show references).  Humor is not universal so students, context and relation to the material must be considered.  Ways to start with humor in the classroom: Begin the class with humor to spark student interest, raise students’ expectations, lower anxiety, and create a more relaxed, positive learning environment. Use humor to encourage deep thinking. Have students work on a difficult concept or equation though a silly or outlandish example.  Don’t try too hard. Don’t use outdated humor/references. Why you should consider using Humor in your next class: Most literature shows that it puts students at ease and lowers anxiety. Engages the students. Helps the instructor build rapport with students (more friendlier, relatable etc).  Helps with retaining content. Resources referenced in this episode:  Evoking truthiness: Using satirical news comedies to teach information literacy by Annis Lee Adams, Stephanie Alexander, and Lana Mariko Wood  Satirical News LibGuide by Annis Lee Adams, Stephanie Alexander, and Lana Mariko Wood No News Is Good News? Satirical News Videos in the Information Literacy Classroom by Stephanie Alexander and Lana Mariko Wood; portal: Libraries and the Academy Plight of the Funny Female by Olga Khazan, The Atlantic Gendered Language in Teacher Reviews by Ben Schmidt Making Jokes During a Presentation Helps Men But Hurts Women by Jonathan Evans, Jerel Slaughter, Aleksander Ellis and Jessi Rivin; Harvard Business Review Women of Color in Academia Often Work Harder for Less Respect by Nadia Owusu; Catapult How Student Evaluations Are Skewed against Women and Minority Professors by Eva Lilienfeld; The Century Foundation Using humor in the college classroom: The pros and the cons by Drew C. Appleby, PhD Humor as a Teaching Tool in the Classroom by Notre Dame Kaneb Learning Center Humor in library instruction: a narrative review with implications for the health sciences by Elena Azadbakht Did You Hear the One about the Boolean Operators? Incorporating Comedy into Library Instruction by Kristin Trefts and Sarah Blakeslee in Reference Services Review  “What Stand-Up Comedians Teach Us about Library Instruction: Four Lessons for the Classroom by Eamon C. Tewell in College & Research Libraries News This episode's theme music: Srivastav, A. (2013). Merry Go Round [Audio file]. Retrieved from https://soundcloud.com/909-music/arnav-srivastav-merry-go  Here's where you can find us: Podcast: @Librarian_Guide Jessica: @LibraryGeek611 Amanda: @HistoryBuff820 Email: InfoLitTeachingPodcast@gmail.com  Be sure to rate and subscribe wherever you listen to the podcast!
58:29
July 21, 2020
Faculty Collaboration
Show Notes: In this episode, Amanda and Jessica are talking about our experiences with faculty collaboration in the classroom. Topics & Takeaways: Faculty collaborations with librarians can range from individual outreach that leads to a one-shot session to a full collaboration on courses or assignment design. We’ve experienced challenging situations ranging from interruptions in class, negative responses to our work to completely taking over class. We can work towards changing the library/faculty collaboration culture by advocating for being seen as equals, changing our language from supporting to collaborating, moving away from the service model and educating faculty on what we really do in libraries. Tips on successful faculty collaboration: Take initiative and don’t wait for faculty to reach out to you. Keep your ‘ears” to the ground and look for ways for to seize opportunities to get involved. Be open minded to different partnerships and collaborations. We need to have a purpose in every project we take on. Breaking down silos is super hard but we are the only ones who are going to do it. We need to just keep advocating, keep pushing back. Resources referenced in this episode: Empowerment, Experimentation, Engagement: Embracing Partnership Models in Libraries by Brian Mathews, Stefanie Metko and Patrick Tomlin in EDUCAUSE Five tips for better faculty-librarian communication and collaboration by Bruce Rosenstein on EmeraldPublishing.com Kevin Seeber Blog Happier with Gretchen Rubin Streaks App The City We Became by N.K. Jemisin This episode's theme music: Srivastav, A. (2013). Merry Go Round [Audio file]. Retrieved from https://soundcloud.com/909-music/arnav-srivastav-merry-go Here's where you can find us: Podcast: @Librarian_Guide Jessica: @LibraryGeek611 Amanda: @HistoryBuff820 Email: InfoLitTeachingPodcast@gmail.com Be sure to rate and subscribe wherever you listen to the podcast!
1:09:43
July 7, 2020
Talking Librarianship with Melissa Wong
Show Notes: In this episode, Amanda and Jessica speak with librarian and library science professor, Melissa Wong, about instructional design, topics from her book, “Instructional Design for LIS Professionals” and remote teaching during COVID. Topics & Takeaways: (Listen to the episode one more time) Resources referenced in this episode: LIS Conversations After Class: Melissa’s website and blog Information Literacy at a (Social) Distance: Strategies for Moving Online - Melissa Wong’s ACRL Webinar CAST - Universal Design for Learning It's open access, but is it accessible? Creating and selecting items for digital accessibility by Rebecca Graham Algorithms of Oppression by Safiya Noble Missed Connections: What Search Engines Say About Women by Safiya Noble Topographies of Whiteness: Mapping Whiteness in Library and Information Science Springshare Accessibility Blog Posts LibVoices: Nicole Cooke Episode Timeline JS Tool Padlet Tool 5 Things You Should Read About Universal Design for Learning (ACRL) Studying Research Blog by Allison Hosier This episode's theme music: Srivastav, A. (2013). Merry Go Round [Audio file]. Retrieved from https://soundcloud.com/909-music/arnav-srivastav-merry-go  Here's where you can find us: Podcast: @Librarian_Guide Jessica: @LibraryGeek611 Amanda: @HistoryBuff820 Email: InfoLitTeachingPodcast@gmail.com Be sure to rate and subscribe wherever you listen to the podcast!
52:29
June 23, 2020
Reflective Teaching Practices
Show Notes: In this episode, Amanda and Jessica talk about reflective teaching, some ideas about journaling and improving our professional practices through reflection. Topics & Takeaways: We improve the more we teach but can we make more opportunities to learn from our teaching through reflection? How do we actively learn about our teaching or professional self to grow from it? Instruction journals allow librarians to get thoughts out about what went well, what did I think I could improve or were there any interesting student interactions in order to reflect and look for patterns. Brainstorm journals that are reviewed frequently can be another form of journal. Librarian to librarian observation and feedback can be a system-level way to learn about your instruction and reflect on it with help from others. Feedback from faculty and students can be helpful, with a few caveats. Just writing down things you learned each day for about 15 minutes can improve our learning. Resources referenced in this episode: Reflective Teaching for Librarians by Char Booth; American Libraries Instruction Journal Template Reflecting Journaling: A Daily Practice by Amanda Leftwich; LibParlor Explanation Effect: Why You Should Always Teach What You Learn by Michael Simmons; Medium.com Reflective Teaching by  Yale Center for Teaching and Learning Word cloud evaluation tweet by Jess Calarco  Feedback 360 LibGuide This episode's theme music: Srivastav, A. (2013). Merry Go Round [Audio file]. Retrieved from https://soundcloud.com/909-music/arnav-srivastav-merry-go Here's where you can find us: Podcast: @Librarian_Guide Jessica: @LibraryGeek611 Amanda: @HistoryBuff820 Email: InfoLitTeachingPodcast@gmail.com Be sure to rate and subscribe wherever you listen to the podcast!
36:41
June 9, 2020
Gamification in Information Literacy Instruction: Tips, Tricks and how to get started!
In this episode, Amanda and Jessica talk to librarians, Serene Rock and Kristine Cwengros, about gamification in information literacy instruction and their poster that was presented at the ACRL DLS Virtual Poster Session last month. Resources referenced in this episode: Epidemics and Hunger Games: Collaborating to Gamify Information Literacy…and Maybe Save the World - Poster & Resource LibGUide by Serene Rock and Kristine Cwengros Games and Gamification in Academic Libraries - Book by Stephanie Crowe & Eva Sclippa Andrew Walsh Twitter: @playbrarian Work Life Balance by Adam Grant Topics & Takeaways: Make gaming relevant to the course objectives and students have a variety of benefits including increasing student motivation and content retention. Effective games provide students scaffolding throughout the process to help move through the game and practice skills. Don’t be afraid to fail and adapt! Start small - no need to create a multi-level game on day 1! Start with a pre-created Jeopardy game or a Kahoot or a 10 minute group game in a larger class session. When asking for faculty collaboration, providing them with a fleshed out idea may increase the potential for a positive response. This episode's theme music: Srivastav, A. (2013). Merry Go Round [Audio file]. Retrieved from https://soundcloud.com/909-music/arnav-srivastav-merry-go  Here's where you can find us: Podcast: @Librarian_Guide Jessica: @LibraryGeek611 Amanda: @HistoryBuff820 Email: InfoLitTeachingPodcast@gmail.com Be sure to rate and subscribe wherever you listen to the podcast!
38:09
May 26, 2020
ACRL Framework Series: Part III- What does the Future Hold for the Frames?
Show Notes: In this episode, Amanda and Jessica wrap up their 3-part series about the ACRL Framework by looking forward to the future. They discuss when and how the ACRL Framework might be refreshed and some ways it could be changed. Topics & Takeaways: Potential Refreshes & Updates Discussed: A large scale study to determine adoption rates and barriers to adoption Updating the language of the descriptions Reorganizing the dispositions Renaming the Framework Adding real world examples Resources referenced in this episode: Community College Librarians and the ACRL Framework: Findings from a National Study published in College & Research Libraries by Susan Wengler and Christine Wolff-Eisenberg (2020) “Information Literacy’s Third Wave” by Barbara Fister, published on InsideHigherEd.com (2019) “Side-by-Side Mode for Screen-Sharing” - Zoom.com ACRL Framework and Standards Alignment Document by Amanda Hovious AACU Values Rubric Special thanks to our listeners whose responses we shared: @blinablevitan Sarah Burns-Feyl This episode's theme music: Srivastav, A. (2013). Merry Go Round [Audio file]. Retrieved from https://soundcloud.com/909-music/arnav-srivastav-merry-go Here's where you can find us: Podcast: @Librarian_Guide Jessica: @LibraryGeek611 Amanda: @HistoryBuff820 Email: InfoLitTeachingPodcast@gmail.com Be sure to rate and subscribe wherever you listen to the podcast!
38:31
May 11, 2020
ACRL Framework Series-Part II: Likes, Dislikes and Favorite Frames
Show Notes: In this episode, Amanda and Jessica continue the 3-part ACRL Framework series. They discuss interesting examples of librarians using the Framework, studies that are based around it as well as their favorite Frames. Resources referenced in this episode: The Sift Newsletter from News Literacy Project Bias Busters: bringing Wikipedia Edit-a-thons to the Classroom for Hispanic Heritage Month (Poster by Laurie McFadden, Jessica Kiebler & Bonnie Lafazan) Student Constructions of Authority in the Framework Era: A Bibliometric Pilot Study Using a Faceted Taxonomy by James W. Rosenzweig, Mary Thill, and Frank Lambert published in College & Research Libraries, 2019 New Discoveries in Reference: The 25th Annual Reference Research Forum - ALA Annual 2019 Presentation by Julie Hunter, Jessica Kiebler, Dina Meky and Samantha Kannegiser Chat reference: evaluating customer service and IL instruction published in Reference Services Review by Julie Hunter, Jessica Kiebler, Dina Meky and Samantha Kannegiser (2019) Beyond CRAAP: An Updated Approach to Source Evaluation LibGuide Reorienting an Information Literacy Program Toward Social Justice: Mapping the Core Values of Librarianship to the ACRL Framework published in Communications in Information Literacy by Lua Gregory and Shana Higgins (2017) Community College Librarians and the ACRL Framework: Findings from a National Study published in College & Research Libraries by Susan Wengler and Christine Wolff-Eisenberg (2020) ACRL Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education This episode's theme music: Srivastav, A. (2013). Merry Go Round [Audio file]. Retrieved from https://soundcloud.com/909-music/arnav-srivastav-merry-go Here's where you can find us: Podcast: @Librarian_Guide Jessica: @LibraryGeek611 Amanda: @HistoryBuff820 Email: InfoLitTeachingPodcast@gmail.com Be sure to rate and subscribe wherever you listen to the podcast!
44:26
April 29, 2020
ACRL Framework Series- Part 1: Our Teaching Experiences & Challenges
Show Notes: In this episode, Amanda and Jessica kick off Part One of a three part series on the ACRL Framework! They discuss what makes the Framework challenging and their experiences with teaching and assessing the Frames. Topics & Takeaways: The ACRL Framework is challenging because: Interconnected concepts that incorporate multiple instructional concepts like metacognition, constructivism, affective learning and backward design Elevated language that at times can seem like jargon It contains A LOT of content which makes organizing, teaching and assessing progression of learning difficult Teaching the Framework at the one-shot level can feel limiting, frustrating and difficult to assess due to the short time-frame, expectations of faculty and not knowing our students. However, there are strategies to developing effective one-shot Framework instruction that meets student needs. One way to integrate the Framework at a program level starts with mapping the knowledge practices and dispositions to beginner, intermediate and advanced levels as well as reviewing syllabi to match assignments to appropriate Frame skills. Various ideas about how to use the Framework in the classroom are discussed. Resources referenced in this episode: Carla Stoffle, Nicole Pagowsky, and Yvonne Mery (2020) Teaching Future Librarian Educators Using the ACRL Framework: A New Graduate Level iSchool Teaching Certificate 23 Framework Things (Activities to learn the Framework) ACRL Framework ACRL Framework Toolkit LibGuide Westchester University Libraries IL Assessment LibGuide Florida Atlantic University IL LibGuide Troy Swanson (2017) Sharing the ACRL Framework with faculty: Opening campus conversations Engaging with the ACRL Framework Workshop Unlocking Us Podcast: Brené on Comparative Suffering, the 50/50 Myth, and Settling the Ball ACRL Webinar: Quickly Implementing Accessibility Tools This episode's theme music: Srivastav, A. (2013). Merry Go Round [Audio file]. Retrieved from https://soundcloud.com/909-music/arnav-srivastav-merry-go Here's where you can find us: Podcast: @Librarian_Guide Jessica: @LibraryGeek611 Amanda: @HistoryBuff820 Email: InfoLitTeachingPodcast@gmail.com Be sure to rate and subscribe wherever you listen to the podcast!
53:59
April 20, 2020
Storytelling and Instruction: What stories do you have to tell?
Show Notes: In this episode, Amanda and Jessica discuss storytelling and instruction. How can you use your experience and previous student support to provide instruction? Topics & Takeaways: Storytelling can be valuable in information literacy instruction because it is informational, memorable and a great way to reach novice learners. What are our experiences with storytelling in the classroom? What are some ways to use infographics as storytelling? What are some barriers to storytelling in the classroom? What are some “Pie in the sky” storytelling techniques you might want to try in the future? Do you think storytelling is an effective instruction technique for one shots? Small ways you can incorporate storytelling into your instruction Resources referenced in this episode: The Teaching Professor: Storytelling: A Valuable Teaching Tool Telling Stories: The Art and Science of Storytelling as an Instructional Strategy by Karen Brakke & Jeremy Ashton Houska Harvard Business Review: What Makes Storytelling So Effective For Learning? Telling the Story: Using Narratives to Explain WHY Information Literacy Education is Important and Get Students Invested in What We Do by Heather Barrow-Stafford Teaching Information Literacy Through Short Stories by David James Brier & Vickery Kaye Lebbin Keeping Up With Digital Storytelling Infographics: The Power of Visual Storytelling by Jason Lankow, Josh Ritchie & Ross Crooks Geeky Pedagogy: A Guide for Intellectuals, Introverts, and Nerds Who Want to Be Effective Teachers by Jessamyn Neuhaus Teaching In Higher Ed Podcast: Episode 286 with Jessamyn Neuhaus This episode's theme music: Srivastav, A. (2013). Merry Go Round [Audio file]. Retrieved from https://soundcloud.com/909-music/arnav-srivastav-merry-gov NOTE: In the episode, Jessica refers to introverted teaching and attributes certain quotes to educator Flower Darby but that should have been attributed to Jessamyn Neuhaus, whose book is linked above. Here's where you can find us: Podcast: @Librarian_Guide  Jessica: @LibraryGeek611 Amanda: @HistoryBuff820 Email: InfoLitTeachingPodcast@gmail.com Be sure to rate and subscribe wherever you listen to the podcast!
54:53
April 7, 2020
What's on the Horizon for Teaching and Learning? : Our Thoughts on the 2020 Educause Horizon Report
Show Notes: In this episode, Amanda and Jessica discuss their thoughts on the recently released EDUCAUSE 2020 Horizon Report and the implications for librarians in higher education. Resources discussed in this episode: 2020 EDUCAUSE Horizon Report Life Kit Podcast Free Professional Development Document for Academic Library Workers (Shoutout to librarian, Jessica Dai, for creating and sharing this editable document!) TOPcast: The Teaching Online Podcast Opening the Black Box of Adaptivity Tips for Working at Home - Tweet from @RebeccaRomney This episode's theme music: Srivastav, A. (2013). Merry Go Round [Audio file]. Retrieved from https://soundcloud.com/909-music/arnav-srivastav-merry-go Here's where you can find us: Podcast: @Librarian_Guide Jessica: @LibraryGeek611 Amanda: @HistoryBuff820 Email: InfoLitTeachingPodcast@gmail.com Be sure to rate and subscribe wherever you listen to the podcast!
56:47
March 26, 2020
Teaching Outside of the Classroom: Designing Fun and Effective IL Programming
In this episode, Amanda and Jessica discuss their successes and failures creating instructional programming that teaches information literacy skills. They discuss tips and challenges to designing and implementing these events. Topics & Takeaways: Instructional programming refers to events and activities in libraries that teach information literacy skills in some form rather than just focusing on bringing students into the library or promoting services. Successes discussed include a Wikipedia Edit-a-Thon, LibraryLand game, tabling events and an online event LibGuide. Challenges in preparing and presenting instructional programming include: Time to plan Collaboration with other departments Lack of student attendance Marketing to students Tips for preparing and presenting instructional programming include: Know what topics and engagement methods are important to your students Be sure to assess your programming Tie your programming to the mission or goals of your department/ institution Collect meaningful data in order to demonstrate value Recognize when a program is no longer working Make sure you do tie your program back to IL skills being taught Resources referenced in the episode: Coronavirus and the Great Online-Learning Experiment Berkeley College Wikipedia Edit-a-Thon LibGuide Celebrate Berkeley College Libraries LibGuide Library Marketing and Outreach Facebook Group Shannon Farrell & Kristen Mastel - Considering Outreach Assessment: Strategies, Sample Scenarios, and a Call to Action (2016) This episode's theme music: Srivastav, A. (2013). Merry Go Round [Audio file]. Retrieved from https://soundcloud.com/909-music/arnav-srivastav-merry-go Here's where you can find us: Podcast: @Librarian_Guide Jessica: @LibraryGeek611 Amanda: @HistoryBuff820 Email: InfoLitTeachingPodcast@gmail.com Be sure to rate and subscribe wherever you listen to the podcast!
49:34
March 13, 2020
What does it take to "Thrive as a Library Professional"? Interview with Susanne Markgren and Linda Miles
Show Notes for Website: In this episode, Amanda and Jessica talk to Susanne Markgren and Linda Miles, authors of the book “How to Thrive as a Library Professional”. They discuss what it means to thrive, the various topics covered in the book and hone in on specific strategies for networking and habit creation. Topics & Takeaways: The chapter topics are Career Vision, Habits, Relationships Building, Organizational Culture, Telling our Stories for Self-Promotion, Mindfulness/Self-Compassion, Creating a Reflective Practice. Success can be defined differently by each person and changes as a person moves through their career. Reflection is an important part of thriving because it requires us to think out all of the aspects of our career, including habits, relationships and our daily work. Habits Mindfulness This episode's theme music: Srivastav, A. (2013). Merry Go Round [Audio file]. Retrieved from https://soundcloud.com/909-music/arnav-srivastav-merry-go Resources referenced in the episode: How to Thrive as a Library Professional: Achieving Success and Satisfaction by Susanne Markgren and Linda Miles David Allen - Getting Things Done method Bullet Journaling
31:51
February 27, 2020
Interview with Barbara Fister on Project Information Literacy in the Age of Algorithms Study
Show Notes: On this episode of The Librarian's Guide to Teaching, Amanda and Jessica talk with Barbara Fister, Scholar-in-Residence at Project Information Literacy and co-researcher on PIL's latest study, "Information Literacy in the Age of Algorithms: Student Experiences with News and Information, and the Need for Change." They discuss the report’s findings, potential barriers to implementing algorithm education and ways that librarians can be a part of the change in higher education. Guest Bio: Barbara Fister is a Scholar-in-Residence at Project Information Literacy and co-researcher on PIL's latest study, "Information Literacy in the Age of Algorithms: Student Experiences with News and Information, and the Need for Change." For three decades Barbara coordinated the library instruction program at Gustavus Adolphus College=, a liberal arts college in Minnesota. In addition to collaborative teaching with faculty across the curriculum she has developed courses on research methods, book culture, first term seminars, and (most recently) launched a new course on Clickbait, Bias, and Propaganda in Information Networks. Resources related to this episode’s theme and mentioned in the show include: Algorithm Report Abstract & Links Full Report: Information Literacy in the Age of Algorithms: Student Experiences with News and Information, and the Need for Change Algo Report Additional Readings Tweet of the week  https://twitter.com/Jessifer/status/1222177875719327744  This episode's theme music: Srivastav, A. (2013). Merry Go Round [Audio file]. Retrieved from https://soundcloud.com/909-music/arnav-srivastav-merry-go Here's where you can find us: Podcast: @Librarian_Guide Jessica: @LibraryGeek611 Amanda: @HistoryBuff820 Email: InfoLitTeachingPodcast@gmail.com Be sure to rate and subscribe wherever you listen to the podcast!
36:33
February 5, 2020
Making Time for Professional Development
Show Notes: On this episode of The Librarian's Guide to Teaching, Amanda and Jessica talk with Bonnie Lafazan, Library Director of the Berkeley College Woodbridge Campus and current member of the ACRL Professional Development Committee and the ACRL Conference 2020 Committee. They chat about the importance of the various levels of professional development, strategies to building a culture of development and how we make time for writing and reading. Topics & Takeaways: Professional development is an important part of keeping up to date on what’s going on in librarianship as well as stretching ourselves as life-long learners. We balance our professional development time between work and personal time based on what works for our lives. Amanda shares some strategies for fitting it in on a tight schedule. For those interested in encouraging professional development at their institution, a variety of strategies are discussed including bringing information back from your local library organizations, giving a variety of opportunities to team members and getting input from staff members on what they want to develop. Resources related to this episode’s theme and mentioned in the show include: ACRL Library Marketing Outreach & Interest Group (including a link to the active Facebook group) ACRL Roles & Strengths of Teaching Librarians American Libraries Magazine College & Research Libraries News Circulating Ideas - Podcasts of Interest (Free PD from podcasts!) Scholarships: ACRL 2021 Scholarships ALA Education Scholarship Lists Routledge Being a Librarian: Professional Development FreeBook ALA Staff Development Links & Bibliography This episode's theme music: Srivastav, A. (2013). Merry Go Round [Audio file]. Retrieved from https://soundcloud.com/909-music/arnav-srivastav-merry-go Here's where you can find us: Podcast: @Librarian_Guide Jessica: @LibraryGeek611 Amanda: @HistoryBuff820 Email: InfoLitTeachingPodcast@gmail.com Be sure to rate and subscribe wherever you listen to the podcast!
31:48
January 27, 2020
Online Information Literacy Instruction Gets Critical
NOTE: It's not your speakers! We had some technical difficulties recording this episode and we are sorry for the choppy audio! In this episode, Amanda and Jessica discuss online instruction, including the concepts of critical digital pedagogy and open pedagogy which were suggested by a listener on Twitter! They discuss incorporating these concepts into the online environment whether in a credit-bearing course, embedded instruction or one-shots.  Topics and Takeaways:  • Critical digital pedagogy asks many of the same questions about teaching as critical pedagogy but extends the discussion into the online environment and includes questions around the use of technology itself. However, online instruction has only been practiced for 20-30 years whereas humans have been teaching and studying pedagogy for thousands of years. How do we bring what we’ve learned into the online realm in a more holistic way rather than being limited by the technology? We need to re-envision online pedagogy!  • Open pedagogy is focused on themes of collaborative learning and inter-connected with open educational resources, open access and other forms of open education.  • How do we adapt our one-shot instruction to “work” in this environment? What are the criteria for successful online one-shots?  • Discussion boards are so limiting in their ability for actual discussion, engagement and assessment. And if we don’t like doing them as students or grading them as teachers, how can we expect our students to feel empowered to do them? We need a new method of creating discussion in our online classrooms.  Links to resources discussed in this episode: There are SO many great resources on these topics - this is by no means a complete list!  o Book: Critical Library Pedagogy Handbook by Nicole Pagowsky& Kelly McElroy (2016) o Book: Critical Library Pedagogy in Practice by Jess Haigh & Elizabeth Brookbank (2020 - The editors just finished accepting proposals in July 2019) o Eamon C. Tewell (2018)  The Practice and Promise of Critical Information Literacy: Academic Librarians’ Involvement in Critical Library Instruction, College & Research Libraries o Monthly Twitter Chat: #CritLib o Kenny Garcia (2019) Keeping Up With Critical Librarianship, ACRL (Great reference list!) o Podcast: The Teaching in Higher Ed Podcast: Critical Instructional Design With Sean Michael Morris o Podcast: The Teaching in Higher Ed Podcast: Small Teaching Online With Flower Darby o Sean Michael Morris: Critical Pedagogy in the Age of Learning Management o Open Pedagogy Notebook  o Podcast: The Teaching in Higher Ed Podcast: Critical Open Pedagogy With Rajiv Jhangiani • Kevin Seeber blog post on faculty collaboration • Meredith Farkas blog series: Thoughts at Mid-Career Part 1 – Letting Go, Questioning, and Pathfinding Thank you to the Twitter users we quoted this episode:  @melodylynn457 Here's where you can find us: https://librariansguidetoteaching.weebly.com/ This episode's theme music: Srivastav, A. (2013). Merry Go Round [Audio file]. Retrieved from https://soundcloud.com/909-music/arnav-srivastav-merry-go 
48:26
January 15, 2020
Who will teach information literacy in the future?
In this episode, Amanda and Jessica discuss both the practical and theoretical ideas behind the future of information literacy. Will librarians always teach information literacy? Will it ever be fully adopted into higher ed curriculum and only taught by faculty?  Topics Discussed & Takeaways:  So many potential answers to these questions are institution specific depending on culture, relationships and contexts. Faculty have a lot of discipline-specific content to cover which is where their expertise lies and since librarians are the research/information experts, this should remain our responsibility. Due to institutional contexts, one-shots can’t always be replaced with a full credit course and if only taught early in their college careers, students would not receive discipline specific instruction. Librarians remain up to date on the technology of research which takes that off of the faculty. And many faculty don’t have to do research on their own so they may not want to learn all of that to teach students. Many posit that we are in a “third wave” of information literacy. Since information is our discipline area, librarians remain up to date with these changes, its impact on society and how to best approach these changes pedagogically (i.e. - ACRL Framework changes).  Links to resources discussed in this episode (or related to the topic):  “Information Literacy’s Third Wave” by Barbara Fister published on Inside Higher Ed (February 14, 2019)  “Defining and teaching information literacy” by Elizabeth Dolinger in College & Research Libraries News, Vol 80, No. 1, 2019  “Philosophical Shift: Teach the Faculty to Teach Information Literacy”, White Paper written by Risë L. Smith and Karl E. Mundt Library  “Competencies in the Major - University of Albany”  Check, Please! Digital Information Evaluation Course, by Mike Caulfield  Thank you to the Twitter users we quoted this episode: @LibraryBon  This episode's theme music: Srivastav, A. (2013). Merry Go Round [Audio file]. Retrieved from https://soundcloud.com/909-music/arnav-srivastav-merry-go Here's where you can find us:  Podcast: @Librarian_Guide  Jessica: @LibraryGeek611  Amanda: @HistoryBuff820  Email: InfoLitTeachingPodcast@gmail.com  Be sure to rate and subscribe wherever you listen to the podcast!
35:18
December 23, 2019
Overcoming Classroom Management Challenges
In this episode, Amanda and Jessica discuss some of the most common classroom management challenges faced by instruction librarians and chat about strategies to overcome them.  Topics Discussed & Takeaways:  Instruction librarians may not have degrees in education but that doesn’t mean they can’t succeed in classroom management.  Five areas of classroom management challenges:  Getting and keeping students engaged  Getting students to participate  Engaging distracted students & keeping everyone on task  Dealing with difficult students  Handling technical difficulties and interruptions  Links to resources discussed in this episode (or related to the topic):  “When You Get Nothing But Crickets” from The Cult of Pedagogy (August 18, 2019)  “Forty ways to survive IL instruction overload; or, how to avoid teacher burnout” by Giovanna Badia in College & Undergraduate Libraries, 2017  “The One-Shot Library Instruction Survival Guide”, Second Edition Heidi E. Buchanan and Beth A. McDonough  “Classroom Management: Dealing with Difficult Students” from Brookhaven College  Thank you to the Twitter users we quoted this episode: @Overthrowinged @WoodsieGirl  This episode's theme music: Srivastav, A. (2013). Merry Go Round [Audio file]. Retrieved from https://soundcloud.com/909-music/arnav-srivastav-merry-go Here's where you can find us:  Podcast: @Librarian_Guide  Jessica: @LibraryGeek611  Amanda: @HistoryBuff820  Email: InfoLitTeachingPodcast@gmail.com  Be sure to rate and subscribe wherever you listen to the podcast!
42:25
November 27, 2019
Engaging Students in the Classroom through Critical Librarianship
In this episode, Amanda and Jessica interview Romel Espinel and discuss his approaches to critical librarianship in the classroom. We discuss teaching styles, student centered practices and practical examples of how to implement these strategies in the classroom.  This episode's theme music: Srivastav, A. (2013). Merry Go Round [Audio file]. Retrieved from https://soundcloud.com/909-music/arnav-srivastav-merry-go Here's where you can find us: Podcast: @Librarian_Guide Jessica: @LibraryGeek611 Amanda: @HistoryBuff820 Email: InfoLitTeachingPodcast@gmail.com We are also now available on itunes! Be sure to find us there and subscribe to our podcast!
42:09
November 7, 2019
Can libraries be "normal"?
Show Notes: On this episode of The Librarian's Guide to Teaching, Amanda and Jessica respond to a recent article published about academic libraries and what students really want. They also share a tweet of the week.  The Atlantic Article: https://www.theatlantic.com/education/archive/2019/10/college-students-dont-want-fancy-libraries/599455/ Duke Study referenced in Atlantic Article: https://library.duke.edu/about/depts/assessment-user-experience/student-survey Ebony Magnus, Jackie Belanger and Maggie Faber; Towards a Critical Assessment Practice: http://www.inthelibrarywiththeleadpipe.org/2018/towards-critical-assessment-practice/ ***Note: The article is discussed with a bit of snark at times but we focus on positive takeaways around library assessment, institutional culture and meeting the needs of students. This episode's theme music: Srivastav, A. (2013). Merry Go Round [Audio file]. Retrieved from https://soundcloud.com/909-music/arnav-srivastav-merry-go Here's where you can find us -- Podcast: @Librarian_Guide Jessica: @LibraryGeek611 Amanda: @HistoryBuff820 Email: InfoLitTeachingPodcast@gmail.com
25:58
October 30, 2019
Assessment: are we asking the right questions?
In this episode, Jessica and Amanda interview ACRL-NJ Chapter President, Cara Berg and they talk about their experiences with assessment, the challenges they encounter and how they are using the data they collect. They also share this week's work triumphs and work fails.  ACRL project outcomes. Retrieved from https://acrl.projectoutcome.org/ Bull, A., Head, A., & MacMillian, M. (2019). Asking the right questions: Bridging gaps between information literacy assessment approaches. Against the Grain, 31(4) Retrieved from https://against-the-grain.com/2019/10/v314-asking-the-right-questions-bridging-gaps-between-information-literacy-assessment-approaches/ This episode's theme music: Srivastav, A. (2013). Merry Go Round [Audio file]. Retrieved from https://soundcloud.com/909-music/arnav-srivastav-merry-go Here's where you can find us: Podcast: @Librarian_Guide Jessica: @LibraryGeek611 Amanda: @HistoryBuff820 Email: InfoLitTeachingPodcast@gmail.com Be sure to rate and subscribe wherever you listen to the podcast!
43:02
October 21, 2019
Impostors in the Classroom?
In the first episode of The Librarians Guide to Teaching, Hosts, Jessica Kiebler and Amanda Piekart introduce themselves, explain why they started this podcast and discussed Impostor Syndrome in the classroom. Below are links to resources discussed in this first episode.  The Imposter Cure by Jessamy Hibberd: https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/48138995-the-imposter-cure?ac=1&from_search=true “Jumping into the Deep: Imposter Syndrome, Defining Success, and the New Librarian”: https://journal.lib.uoguelph.ca/index.php/perj/article/view/3979/3994 Clance, P.R., and Imes, S.A. (1978). The impostor phenomenon in high achieving women: Dynamics and Therapeutic interventions. Psychotherapy: Theory Research and Practice, 15, 241-247. https://www.paulineroseclance.com/impostor_phenomenon.html ACRL eLearning Course: http://www.ala.org/acrl/onlinelearning/impostersyndrome "Driven" Podcast - The 1st 3 episodes are a failure series: https://thedrivenpodcast.com/ This episodes theme music: Srivastav, A. (2013). Merry Go Round [Audio file]. Retrieved from https://soundcloud.com/909-music/arnav-srivastav-merry-go  Amanda Twitter handle: @historybuff820 Jessica Twitter handle: @librarygeek611 Podcast website: https://librariansguidetoteaching.weebly.com/ 
29:36
October 1, 2019